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Seminars


Please note: Before registering for any of these seminars, be sure your name is on the appropriate sign-up sheet in the honors center office.

Please sign-up for only one seminar and be certain you intend to take that seminar before placing your name on the sign-up sheet.

Fall Semester 2018


  • HON 101HA — Latin: Language, Literature & Culture
    • Dr. Ann Tracy
    • TR 2 – 3:15
    • 3 Credits

    This course considers the Latin language through Ancient Roman culture and history and progresses through an examination of the continuing influence of Latin in our times. We will also pay special attention to the essential components of Latin that continue in the Romance languages of French, Spanish, Italian, etc. (so if you know any of these languages you may recognize some of the work we will be doing).

    Our text, Latin via Ovid, introduces beginners to Latin structure, grammar, and vocabulary through increasingly sophisticated re-tellings of Ovid’s Metamorphoses. (It’s a good text, detailed, wide-ranging, and amusing, with lists of Latin terms particular to various disciplines and occupations. We’ll start with a chapter a week and probably pick up speed.) If you are not familiar with Ovid, you will recognize many of the classical myths we know today through his versions of these tales. There’ll be some creative writing in Latin, as well as the inevitable learning of vocabulary and useful phrases, quizzes, a midterm and a final. There will be oral reports on cultural and historical matters. The course also illustrates Latin’s influence on the Christian church and theology, the law, science, and philosophy, and practically speaking, the course serves as a good preparation for graduate examinations. We’ll examine the uses of Latin in modern life: expressions embodied in medicine ("stet!"), scholarship ("sic"), and sharp replies ("tu quoque!"); university mottoes; misleadingly-translated tattoos; the Latin broadcasts of Finnish news. The course also illustrates Latin’s influence on the Christian church and theology, the law, science, and philosophy, and practically speaking, the course serves as a good preparation for graduate examinations. Because the breadth of possibility in such a seminar is daunting, the dominant interests of any particular class will at least be considered.

    This seminar will satisfy the Foreign Language component of the SUNY Plattsburgh general education program.

    This seminar will meet in the Honors Center — 121 Hawkins Seminar Room B

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