HIS Courses

HIS101 - United States Civilization to 1877 (3 cr.)

Development of the American civilization we know today. Political, economic, social and cultural life of the American people from the first European settlements through Reconstruction. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS102 - United States Civilization Since 1877 (3 cr.)

This course examines such topics as Reconstruction, industrialization and urbanization in the late nineteenth century, creation of the American empire, intermittent reform movements, social and cultural movements, and wars and economic cycles in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

HIS121 - European Civilization to 1815 (3 cr.)

Social, political, economic and cultural events from the late Medieval period to the fall of Napoleon. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS122 - European Civilization Since 1815 (3 cr.)

This course examines the social, political, economic and cultural events from the fall of Napoleon to the present. Recent historical currents and traditions from European affairs, especially those which characterize modern life. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS132 - Modern Global History (3 cr.)

This course draws from the tradition of global, regional, and comparative history and exposes students to history from the macro-level. The course examines the social, cultural, political, and economic processes that connect and divide humanity starting roughly at 1300. The course takes significant account of European colonization of the Americas, the industrial revolution, and the expansion of European empire. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS161 - Colonial Latin America, 1492-1825 (3 cr.)

Colonial period of Latin America: existing Amerindian societies, the European Conquest, breakdown of conquest society, the emergence of colonial society, the Bourbon attempt to transform colonial society, and breakup of the Spanish and Portuguese empires. (Fall).Liberal arts.

HIS162 - Middle and Modern Latin America (3 cr.)

In tracing the rise and development of two distinct societies in Latin America--those of the Middle Period and Modern Era--the course examines three longstanding, intertwining conflicts that dominated the struggle over direction in the historical evolution of these nations after independence: 1) the beneficiaries of political power and economic resources (hierarchy vs. egalitarianism); 2) the geographic scale upon which those social interests were best served (regional vs. national); 3) the cultural expressions (reflecting values, attitudes, and behavior) to embody, interpret, and affirm the larger society and the common good. (Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS171 - History of Canada to the 1860s (3 cr.)

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting Canadian history to the 1860s. (Fall). Liberal arts.

HIS172 - History of Canada from the 1860s (3 cr.)

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting Canadian history from the 1860s to the present. (Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS173 - History of the French in North America (3 cr.)

This course examines the history of French speakers in North America from the colonial period to the contemporary era. It offers a continental perspective that encompasses Quebec, the Northeastern United States, Louisiana, and Northwestern Canada. The course will consider how historical events have shaped and given expression to the various forms of contemporary Francophone culture in North America. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS181 - East Asian Civilization (3 cr.)

Survey of East Asian history and culture. Topics include Confucianism, Buddhism, the Japanese Samurai, the Mongol empire, the war in Vietnam and the Rise of the Pacific Rim. Examines Chinese emperors inside the Forbidden City and commoners in the villages and markets of the East Asian countryside. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS285 - Historical Practices (3 cr.)

A broad introduction to the discipline of history, focusing on its principle concepts, problems, and questions, including: the perspectives of time and space in human experience; the individual and history; historical phenomenon (i.e., revolution, conquest, golden age); and historical causes and their relation to other disciplines. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts. Prerequisites: history majors or minors (others see chairperson for permission); sophomore standing.

HIS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS300 - Topics in History (1 to 3 cr.)

Various topics are treated historically by examination of primary and secondary materials. Examples may include a focus on biography, on a special theme, on comparative history, or on methodological approaches. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.Prerequisite: any 100 level HIS course or POI.

HIS303 - History of the American Woman (3 cr.)

A survey of the history of American women focusing on the significance of gender identity in determining women's experiences. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

HIS304 - A History of American Labor (3 cr.)

A history of American labor, unorganized and organized, from colonial times to the present. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing, 3 cr. of U.S. history

HIS306 - History of New York State (3 cr.)

Political, social and economic development of New York from early settlement to modern times. Show how New York became the Empire State, and the part it has played in the nation's development. Local history receives emphasis. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of American history.

HIS307 - U.S. Foreign Policy 1776-Present (3 cr.)

The development of U.S. foreign policy from the Revolution to the present. Topics include nationalism, wars and interventionism expansionism, superpower competition, and the interrelationship between foreign and domestic affairs. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of U.S. history.

HIS308 - Cold War-Vietnam (3 cr.)

The development of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, Korean and Vietnam wars, military interventionism, corporate expansionism, the nuclear arms race, and the domestic context of foreign policy. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of history.

HIS309 - History of the American Family (3 cr.)

Changes in the structure and size of families; changing functions of the family, changing roles and relationships within the family; the family as a reflection of broader trends in society; new methodologies and approaches to social history. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

HIS310 - The Colonial Period: Roots of American Society (3 cr.)

Political, social, economic and intellectual life of the American colonial period. Puritanism, Indian-white relations, slavery and other social strains. The colonial period's relationships to the American Revolution. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS311 - America's Revolutionary Era, 1763-1815 (3 cr.)

Compares the American Revolution with a variety of present day revolutionary movements in such aspects as 1) the social, cultural and political origins of colonial rebellions, 2) the problems of fighting a war of liberation while attempting to unify and govern a pluralistic, contentious population, and 3) the consolidation of governmental power and creation of nationalism. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS314 - Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.)

Causes and events leading to secession; ideology of republican party; military campaigns; impact of the war on American thought; emancipation; conservative and radical reconstruction; aspirations of blacks; failure of reconstruction. (Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS315 - Corporate Impact on America, 1877-1933 (3 cr.)

Examines the effects of industrial capitalism and the corporation on American society, economy and politics. Topics will include incorporation, corporate principles in politics and society, business interests in foreign policy, and the workers' and farmers' response to corporate capitalism. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS316 - U.S. Immigration and Ethnic History (3 cr.)

This course presents a chronological/thematic overview of immigration in the United States from European colonization to the early twenty-first century. In addition to learning about major migration movements, students will examine the causes and effects of migration on individuals and communities. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102.

HIS317 - Modern American, 1933-Present (3 cr.)

The New Deal, its interruption by World War II, together with its partial resumption after the war by the Fair Deal, New Frontier and Great Society. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS319 - U.S. Environmental History (3 cr.)

This course studies the history of the role and place of nature in American culture. The central goal of the course is to explore the changing conceptions of nature in the United States in order to understand ways in which the natural environment have been an influence in the history of the nation. Includes a case study of the Adirondacks. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in history.

HIS320 - History of U.S. Youth Culture (3 cr.)

A cultural history of the American teenager, focusing on the post-WWII era and examining how style and culture play central roles in both youth identity and youth marketing in the United States. Extensive discussion on popular music; films, such as Public Enemy and Blackboard Jungle; and the relationship between popular media and national trends and ideas of juvenile delinquency. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in U.S. history.

HIS323 - Race and Ethnicity in American Culture (3 cr.)

Examines the ways in which notions of race and ethnicity play critical roles in the production of American culture, focusing on African American and immigrant cultural traditions. Topics could include the 19th century minstrel stage; the Harlem Renaissance; "Amos-n-Andy"; films such as Birth of a Nation and Bulworth; the assimilation of Jewish and Mexican immigrant groups; the zoot suit riots; Japanese fashion and theatre traditions; World War II propaganda films; Beat literature and comedy; and the rise of the hip hop nation. (Every Year or Third Semester). Liberal arts.

HIS324 - Germany, 1870 to the Present (3 cr.)

Development of newly created German Empire. Modern German leadership and the impact of two world wars upon the Germans. Resulting effects on international relations. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in European history.

HIS326 - History of Modern Britain 1600 - Present (3 cr.)

This course will present the history of the United Kingdom as a group of different nations that retained unique social identities in spite of political and economic union. Political, social, economic and global aspects will be studied in parallel to understand both the development of Great Britain as an imperial and industrial power and the decline of that power in the twentieth century. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

HIS330 - The Cultural History of U.S. Exploration (3 cr.)

Study of the social and cultural history of modern U.S. exploration in various physical environments. Topics include: cultural and political uses of exploration; the social practice of engineering expeditions; the consequences and social repercussions of exploration. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three credits of U.S. history.

HIS331 - Gender and U.S. Popular Culture (3 cr.)

The social construction of gender in modern America through the lens of popular culture: the way TV shows, films, advertisements, magazines, video games, and music depict and define "men" and "women." Topics include: understanding gender in a historical, cultural context; examining femininity and masculinity as cultural inventions; using popular culture to resist gender norms. (Spring). Prerequisite: U.S. History General Education course (3AH or 4USC).

HIS333 - Civilization of the Middle Ages to 1250 (3 cr.)

European civilization from the decline of the Roman Empire to the 13th century. Feudalism and manorialism; emphasis: daily life in medieval culture. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing or POI.

HIS334 - Civilization of the Middle Ages, 1250-1550 (3 cr.)

Europe in the late Middle ages. Economic and social changes of 13th century Europe; rise of the national state; decline of medieval institutions; religious problems leading to the Reformation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing or POI.

HIS335 - Social History of Early Modern Europe (3 cr.)

Survey of major changes and issues in European society from 1450-1750. Topics include: material culture, family and community structure, social conflict, religious beliefs, rural and urban popular culture and the experiences of particular groups such as the subordinate classes, women and peasants. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS121.

HIS337 - Colonial Encounters in the "New World" (3 cr.)

Focus on the first encounters between Europeans and indigenous people in the early modern "New World." The nature, significance and long-term impact of these encounters will be studied. The focus will be on contemporary texts which provide us with evidence for an understanding of the attitudes which led to invasion, expropriation and exploitation. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: one of the following courses: HIS101, HIS121, HIS161, HIS171, LAS111, CAS111.

HIS338 - Europe, 1914-1939 (3 cr.)

Analysis of European history from 1914 to the eve of World War II. Political developments, post-war adjustments and revolution; the Depression and the growth of Fascism. Social and economic factors stressed. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in European history.

HIS339 - European History, 1939 to Present (3 cr.)

World War II, the political developments following it, as they concern Europe, the Cold War, the continents division by the superpowers; and its reassertion as an economic and cultural force in world affairs. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in European history.

HIS342 - History of Ecology and Environmentalism (3 cr.)

Study of the history of ecological science and conservation from the eighteenth century to the present, focusing on the interchange between science, politics, and public policy, primarily in America. Topics include: foundations of ecological thought, history of the discipline of ecology, conservation, and environmentalism. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in history; sophomore standing.

HIS344 - Adirondack Environmental History (3 cr.)

Study of the history of interactions between humans and the environment in the Adirondack Mountains and Lake Champlain from the sixteenth century to the present. Topics include human uses of material nature; human ideas and culture of nature; the political and economic management of nature; race, class, gender, and environmental justice. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: sophomore standing; U.S. history (3 cr.) or environmental science (3 cr.).

HIS345 - History of Education in Western Societies (3 cr.)

A survey of significant educational systems and thinkers in Western civilization from the ancient world to the present. Schools and teachers studied as historical reflections of societies which produced them, and as agencies for social control and social change. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

HIS347 - Iroquois World to 1800 (3 cr.)

A survey of cultural, social and political life among the Iroquois from 1450 to 1800 with particular attention to Iroquois interactions with neighboring Native American societies and European colonists in an exceptionally turbulent era. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: one course in either U.S., Canadian or European history.

HIS354 - Peasants: Society and Rebellion (3 cr.)

Study of peasants in the developing world from the late eighteenth century to the present. Topics include peasant farming and family life, interaction and conflict with the modern world, pre-modern forms of insurrection, banditry and modern guerrilla warfare, as well as peasant rebellions in support of communist revolutions and resistance against those governments. (Fall). Liberal arts.

HIS355 - Gender and Migration in the World (3 cr.)

What are the "gender rules" that affect migration? How do different communities cope with the need to migrate and the demands of family structure? Compares gender-based migration strategies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries around the world, evaluates reasons for success or failure and assesses the interaction of gender and ethnic identity. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisite: three credits of history.

HIS356 - History of Global Frontiers (3 cr.)

Families in covered wagons and Zulu warriors may be iconic images of frontiers, but how did the frontiers emerge in the first place? While studying frontier encounters around the world and across time, this course examines how historians have shaped the idea of 'frontier' to explain the meeting of cultures, with a focus on comparison as a method of historical analysis. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and HIS101 or HIS121 or HIS132 or ANT102; sophomore standing.

HIS360 - The Caribbean (3 cr.)

Survey of historical developments of island nations and peoples from colonial era through the contemporary period, with emphasis upon Cuba, Puerto Rico, Haiti, Jamaica and the Dominican Republic. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in history or three credits in Latin American studies.

HIS362 - Modern Mexico (3 cr.)

Mexican history: its movement through problems of creating a nation state; the North American and French Interventions: the dictatorship of the Porfiriato; Revolution of 1910; the evolution of the modern Mexican state and society after 1920. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of history or three credits of Latin American studies.

HIS3625 - Latin American Revolutions (3 cr.)

Examines revolutionary movements in Latin America. Particular emphasis on the twentieth century and on social conditions, political systems, economic development, and foreign relations. Examines prevailing debates on economic, political, social, and cultural dynamics of revolutions. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: one of the following: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS132 or HIS161 or HIS162 or LAS111 or PSC321.

HIS364 - Mercosur-Regional Integration (3 cr.)

An in-depth study of how the historical development of two important Latin American regions (Brazil and the LaPlata Basin), though having developed from different cultural traditions, with the onset of modernization in the mid-Nineteenth Century began to follow an increasingly similar course, such that by the late 20th Century a single historical region has come into formation. Mercosur is the common market expression of this integration. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of history or three credits of Latin American studies.

HIS365 - Modern U.S. Popular Culture (3 cr.)

Critical approaches, issues, theoretical frameworks, and questions in the study of United States popular culture. Topics include: defining the "popular;" the production, reception, interpretation, and history of cultural texts; how the consumption of popular culture shapes subjectivity; understanding the complexities of key aspects of popular culture, namely music, television, film, and internet cyber culture. (Every Other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102.

HIS367 - Gender and Race in the History of Medicine in the United States (3 cr.)

Explores the importance of the categories of gender and race to the development of medical practice in the United States and to the shape our current medical system has taken, especially in regard to options Americans have in selecting healers, options Americans have in becoming accredited healers, and the development of the American hospital system. We will also look at the historical and current experience of women and minorities in the American health care system. (Spring ). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HIS101 or HIS102 or POI.

HIS368 - Food and Culture in the U.S. (3 cr.)

Explores the way food, eating, and popular culture intersect. Topics include: the social history of food in the U.S.; the role food plays in shaping ethnic and gender identity; how food processing advertising influences eating habits; the cultural significance of current food trends. (Every other year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HIS101 or HIS102.

HIS369 - Topics: Exploring Jewish History (3 cr.)

Exploration of some of the aspects of Jewish history, seeking patterns, cultural values and specific historical settings that reveal how Jews have lived, by choice or coercion, within the context of other societies. Topics will vary in content and focus with each offering (e.g., "The Jew in the Western World," "Jews in the 20th Century," "The Holocaust," "Racism, Anti-Semitism and Western Values," "Zionism, Israel and the Middle East," etc.). May be repeated once for credit with a different topic. Liberal Arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: INT101 or HIS121 or HIS122 or POI.

HIS370 - History of Canadian Women (3 cr.)

Position and role of women in Canadian history from 1500 to the present involving class discussion, lectures and student presentations. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS171 or HIS172.

HIS372 - North America and the World (3 cr.)

This seminar uses a comparative focus to explore the history of Canada, the United States and Mexico in the second half of the twentieth century. Students will investigate the ways these countries have shared a common trajectory, and also upon the ways in which they have differed. Important economic, political, sociocultural and environmental issues will be examined, as well as the impact of globalization. (Every Other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS161 or HIS162 or HIS171 or HIS172 or POI.

HIS373 - 20th Century Canada (3 cr.)

Reading seminar in development of modern Canada from 1896 federal election through the Trudeau years. Although emphasis changes annually, two or more of the following themes are treated: constitutional development; World War I; Canadian-American relations; industrialization-urban Canada, the Commonwealth; Canada and the Cold War; peacekeeping in the Third World. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS172.

HIS375 - Borderland and Migration History: Canada and the United States (3 cr.)

A study of the migration streams between Canada and the United States from the colonial period to the present. Canada-U.S. migrations are examined in a global context, addressing social, political, economic, and cultural issues. (Every other year) Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172.

HIS377 - Women and Autobiography (3 cr.)

Explores the uses of women's autobiography in the discipline of women's history. Reading consists of autobiographies of women from a variety of 20th Century global contexts, e.g., South Africa, Zanzibar, Guatemala, China, India, and the American South, and of reviews and criticism of these autobiographies. While learning about some fascinating women, students critically explore autobiographies as a source of insight on issues such as empowerment, oppression, legal rights, motives, self portrayal and multiple visions of liberation. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and any 100-level history or English course.

HIS378 - History of Migration in Britain and the British Empires (3 cr.)

From the fifteenth century to the twentieth the people of the British Isles spread from two small European islands to populate colonies and nations on five continents. This course covers migration within and between those territories, from internal migration, the colonization of Ireland and disastrous early attempts at New World colonies through the establishment of the Raj community in India and the reverse migration of British colonists and colonials during the decolonization that followed the Second World War. (every second or third year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS121 or HIS122 or ANT102.

HIS379 - Quebec in the United States: Franco-American History and Culture (3 cr.)

This course examines the history and culture of French-Canadian descendants in the United States. It will explore issues of gender and class, the social significance of language, the effects of assimilation, and the challenges faced by contemporary Franco-Americans. (Every other Fall). Liberal Arts. Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172.

HIS381 - Women in East Asian History (3 cr.)

Study of women in East Asian from the first millennium BC to the present. Topics include Confucianism, palace women, comfort women, prostitutes and geisha, women in peasant villages and urban factories, modernization and feminist voices, and women's lives in modern communist and capitalist countries. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in history; sophomore standing.

HIS384 - Religion in the Modern World (3 cr.)

Explores the complex position of religion in modern western societies, as both a source of conflict and an agent of change. Primary emphasis is on the political uses of religion, rather than on the defining tenets of any particular religious tradition. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS121 or HIS122 or HIS132.

HIS385 - Advanced Historical Practices (3 cr.)

Within an interactive seminar format that stimulates writing and speaking, students develop the analytical and interpretive skills learned in HIS285 in order to read and evaluate primary and secondary source materials, Seminar topics are cross-cultural historical themes, such as imperialism, slavery, capitalism, fascism, etc. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: ENG101, HIS285, six 300/400 level credits in history, junior standing, or POI.

HIS386 - Japan and China in the World Wars (3 cr.)

Examines the world wars within the context of regional conflict in East Asia. Topics include the Japanese invasion of China, the emergence of General Tojo, "Comfort Women," the "Rape of Nanjing," Hiroshima, and the rise of Chinese Communists. Discusses global issues including colonization and industrialization of the Pacific Rim, Pan-Asianism, and Asian alliances with Allied and Axis powers. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

HIS389 - People's Republic of China (3 cr.)

The revolutionary transformation of China since 1949; selected topics in culture and civilization. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

HIS391 - Slavery in the Americas, 1492 - 1889 (3 cr.)

Examines slavery across the Americas. Case studies in Brazil, the United States, and the Caribbean. Special emphasis on race and its relationship to slavery. Examines prevailing debates on economic, political, cultural, social dynamics of slavery. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: one of the following: HIS101, 132, 161, 162, 121, 122, or LAS111, or AAS103.

HIS394 - U.S. Historic Sites (3 cr.)

An investigation into the nation's major historic sites with particular meaning. While assessing their relationship to major historical issues--including race, class, gender and imperialism--the course examines such sites as Jamestown, Williamsburg, Little Big Horn, Gettysburg, Pearl Harbor and Ellis Island. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of U.S. history.

HIS395 - Introduction to Historic Preservation (3 cr.)

The development and styles of America's built environment, the growth of the historic preservation movement, the philosophies of preservation, contemporary preservation work, on-site activities, and opportunities in the field. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

HIS396 - Social Studies Teaching Methods (3 cr.)

This course examines the focus, methods, and debates of the social sciences and strategies for teaching these topics in social studies. The course is designed to help prepare pre-service teachers to teach adolescent learners effectively in the social studies classroom. Prospective social studies teachers will learn to describe educational goals, learning objectives, and student outcomes and then to match them to instructional materials, teaching processes, assessment practices, and the adolescent learning process. Students of this course will gain practical experience in developing and teaching effective social studies lessons. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: HIS285.

HIS397 - History Museums in the United States (3 cr.)

Traces the social and cultural development of U.S. history museums from the "cabinets of curiosities," to patriotic houses and re-created villages, to today's diverse organizations. Examples include Colonial Williamsburg, Seneca Falls, New York's Tenement Museum, New Bedford's Whaling Museum, and Elvis's Graceland. Topics encompass the changing definition of historic, the conflicting uses of the past, and controversies over inclusion, representation, and contemporary politics. (Every Fourth or Fifth Semester). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HIS101 or HIS102 or POI.

HIS398 - Strangers in the Land: Canadian and U.S. Responses to Immigrant Populations (3 cr.)

This course will compare and contrast community reactions to immigrant populations in the United States and Canada from the mid-1800's to the present. Immigrations to Canada and the USA will be viewed in a global context, addressing social, political, economic, and cultural issues. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172 or HIS173.

HIS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS401 - Topics in Area Histories (3 cr.)

Using an analytical approach and seminar structure, special topics are chosen by the instructors in their area of specialty for indepth study. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in topic area.

HIS414 - Religion and Popular Culture in the United States (3 cr.)

Examines the history of religious representations in the United States modern popular culture, including the ways followers of major organized religions have utilized pop culture; students will also identify and critically examine religious themes in mainstream pop culture texts. (Spring or Fall, every other year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS101, HIS102, HIS121, HIS122, HIS132, HIS161, or HIS162.

HIS425 - History of Scotland from Independence to Devolution (3 cr.)

Connects ideas of Scottishness to the myth and reality of the Scottish past. Covers Scottish history from the 13th century Wars of Independence through the creation of the Devolved Scottish Parliament in 1999. Throughout there is an emphasis on distinctive Scottish identity in contrast to and in concert with England and Britain. (Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS121 or HIS122 and ENG101 or satisfaction of Written Expression requirement or equivalent.

HIS426 - Christians and Jews (3 cr.)

Explores the complex relationship between Christians and Jews throughout history. Looks beyond instances of conflict and coexistence to how being Jewish and being Christian are kinds of experience that evolved in tandem with one another, and take root in specific contexts, in which power, politics, economics and other factors are decisive. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: sophomore standing and any three credits of history.

HIS430 - American Indian History (3 cr.)

Examines major themes, events, and trends in North American Indian history. Focuses on the historical experiences of Native Americans and their struggles to retain their cultures while adapting to the challenges posed by catastrophic population decline, expansion and conquest by colonizing powers, and the "Indian policies" adopted by the United States. Liberal arts. (Every Other Fall). Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102 or ANT102.

HIS431 - First Nations of Canada (3 cr.)

Examines major themes, events, and trends in the history of Aboriginal people in what is now "Canada." Explores the cultures and historical experiences of Indigenous people, including their struggles to retain their culture, land, and sovereignty in the face of catastrophic population decline, expansion and conquest by colonizing powers, and the policies adopted by the provinces and the federal government. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS132 or HIS171 or HIS172 or ANT102 or CAS111.

HIS485 - Senior Project: Topic (3 cr.)

Working in a seminar setting with a faculty mentor, the student will design and complete a major historical project (e.g., original research paper, archival collection, exhibit, etc.). (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS385, twelve 300-400 level credits in history; senior standing; or POI.

HIS486 - Senior Seminar in Social Studies Pedagogy (3 cr.)

This capstone research seminar experience provides students with an opportunity to conduct primary and secondary research in social studies, develop and articulate original arguments, and transform this research into a pedagogical project suitable for teaching in an adolescent education social studies class. Prerequisites: HIS285, HIS385 and HIS396.

HIS490 - Honors Project (3 cr.)

Building the foundations of an in-depth investigation of a significant historical problem: review and assessment of appropriate secondary literature, identification and study of relevant primary sources. Topic to be determined under supervision of Honors Project Faculty Sponsor and faculty committee. (Fall). Prerequisites: overall GPA of 3.5 in history courses; cumulative GPA of 3.2; HIS385; and departmental approval of topic.

HIS491 - Honors Project II (3 cr.)

Completing an in-depth investigation of a significant historical problem begun in HIS490, producing a substantial work of original scholarship, and presenting the results to a public audience. Topic to be determined under supervision of Honors Project Faculty Sponsor and faculty committee. Public defense of project at its conclusion. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: overall GPA of 3.5 in history courses; cumulative GPA of 3.2; HIS385; departmental approval of topic; and either concurrent enrollment in HIS490 or successful completion of HIS490.

HIS498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

Under the direct guidance of an on-site supervisor, the intern undertakes a professionally related project that prepares him/her for the particular skills and work needed in that profession. Opportunities include specialized work at a library archive or local history collection, a historic house museum or history museum, a historic site or preservation organization, or a similar work placement. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS285; and nine additional HIS credits; and 3.0 overall GPA; and junior or senior standing; and Campus-Designated Learning Contract.

HIS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS515 - Topics in American History (3 cr.)

Using an analytical approach and seminar structure, special collections of readings focusing on a common theme are chosen by the instructors in their area specialty for in-depth study. Students prepare a research paper in the specialty. (Fall/Spring).Prerequisites: 6 hours in United States history.

HIS522 - Seminar in European History (3 cr.)

A study of some of the basic problems and traditions of Europe. After their identification they are analyzed and discussed so as to give the advanced student a deeper insight into European institutions and traditions and to promote a better understanding of the political, social, religious and ethnic divisions on which much of Western attitudes and thoughts are based. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: 6 hours of European history.

HIS527 - Topics in European History (3 cr.)

Using an analytical approach and seminar structure, special collections of readings focusing on a common theme are chosen by the instructors in their area specialty. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: 6 hours in European history.

HIS581 - Seminar on Asian Civilization (3 cr.)

An interdisciplinary analysis of selected problems and issues pertaining to contemporary Asian Cultural areas. (Spring). Prerequisites: 6 hours in Asian Studies; includes any offerings by art, literature, philosophy, etc. departments).

HIS599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

Search the College Course Catalog

Enter a course number or three-letter curriculum code to search the College Catalog:

Alphabetical Listing of Curriculum Descriptions by Course Subject

A

  • Africana Studies = AAS
  • Accounting = ACC
  • Anthropology = ANT
  • Arabic = ARA
  • Art = ART
  • Asian Studies = ASI
  • Astronomy = AST

B

  • Biology = BIO
  • Business = BUS

C

  • Canadian Studies = CAS
  • Communications Disorders & Sciences = CDS
  • Consumer Economics Management = CEM
  • Chemistry = CHE
  • Counseling = CLG
  • Career Life Planning = CLP
  • Communication Studies = CMM
  • Computer Science = CSC
  • Criminal Justice = CRI

E

  • Economics = ECO
  • Education = EDU
  • Education - Administration = EDA
  • Education - Mathematics = EDM
  • Education - Reading = EDR
  • Education - Special = EDS
  • English = ENG
  • Environmental Science = ENV
  • English as a Second Language = ESL
  • Expeditionary Studies = EXP

F

  • Finance = FIN
  • Foreign Languages & Literature = FLL
  • French = FRE
  • Freshman Seminar = FRS
  • Freshman Experience = FRX

G

  • Geography = GEG
  • Gender & Women's Studies = GWS
  • Geology = GEL
  • German = GER

H

  • Health Education = HED
  • History = HIS
  • Honors = HON
  • Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management = HRT
  • Human Development and Family Relations = HDF

I

  • Interdisciplinary Studies = INT
  • Italian = ITA

J

  • Journalism = JOU

L

  • Latin American Studies = LAS
  • Latin = LAT
  • Leadership = MLS
  • Library Skills = LIB
  • Language & Linguistics = LIN

M

  • Mathematics = MAT
  • Meteorology = MET
  • Military Studies = MTS
  • Management & International Business = MGM
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship = MKE
  • Minority Studies = MNS
  • Music = MUS

N

  • Nursing = NUR
  • Nutrition = FNI

P

  • Physical Education = PED
  • Philosophy = PHI
  • Physics = PHY
  • Portuguese = POR
  • Political Science = PSC
  • Psychology = PSY

R

  • Reading = RDG
  • Recreation = REC
  • Russian = RUS

S

  • Science & Society = SCI
  • Sociology = SOC
  • Spanish = SPA
  • Social Work = SWK

T

  • Theatre = THE
  • Tutor Training = TTR