GEG Courses

GEG120 - Introduction to Physical Geography (3 cr.)

The study of natural processes of the earth-environment system and its component subsystems of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Special focus on real or locational differentiations of naturally occurring phenomena and the physical processes operating to produce such patterns. Technology employed by physical geographers given due attention. The impact of human activities on the natural environment and its processes stressed. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

GEG121 - Human Geography (3 cr.)

Explores the concepts and potential of human geography in the world today. Topics include globalization, agriculture and rural societies, urbanization and placemaking, geographies of economic development, politics of territory and place and environmentalism in the world today. (Fall, Spring & Summer). Liberal arts.

GEG133 - Historical Geography of the U.S. (3 cr.)

The origin and evolution of American culture, society, and cultural landscapes. Spatial organization of the United States from Colonial Days to present. Selected topics and regions analyzed in terms of geographic change through time. Primary topics include natural resource perception and assessment, settlement, population, economic activities, transportation, and urbanization. (Fall).

GEG199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

GEG224 - World Regional Geography (3 cr.)

Introduction to regional geography concepts with emphasis on common and specific issues of non-Western regions in an era of contemporary globalization, including the study of diverse features of history, institutions, economy, society and culture of non-Western civilization. Liberal arts. (Spring).

GEG290 - Global Positioning Systems and Digital Mapping (3 cr.)

Focuses on the use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in the field and digital image analysis, especially the interpretation of topographic maps, digital orthophotos, and related applications in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Strenuous winter or summer field trips are required, so students should be in adequate physical condition. A personal GPS unit is desirable, but not required. (Winter). Liberal arts.

GEG299 - Independent (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GEG301 - Global Planning Principles (3 cr.)

Examination of the global planning principles for environmental, rural and urban development. Critical study of the interrelations among global, national and local planning strategies. (Spring, Winter & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

GEG303 - Environmental Conservation (3 cr.)

Philosophy and principles of the wise use of natural resources (soil, water, forest, rangeland, wildlife, minerals, energy, recreation resources) including their nature, significance and distribution patterns. Natural planning concepts emphasized. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: any introductory course in geography, environmental science, biology, or anthropology.

GEG304 - Economic Geography (3 cr.)

The study of geographical perspectives of the world economy, exploring the economic factors affecting population, production and distribution, locational decisions, human-environment interactions, exchange and consumption of wealth in the global context. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: any 100-level course in GEG or ECO, or ENV201 or POI.

GEG307 - Urban Geography and Planning (3 cr.)

Investigates the geographical dimensions of urbanization and potential of geography for planning. Topics include patterns of global urbanization, city spaces and urban structures, neighborhoods and place identity, as well as urban planning concepts and skills. (Spring). Liberal arts.

GEG308 - Political Geography (3 cr.)

Examines the geographic components of political activity in a global context. Many territorial factors, such as internal and external political organization, boundaries, cultural problems, strategic theory and the Law of the Sea are discussed. Liberal arts.

GEG310 - Geography of the U.S. in Global Perspective (3 cr.)

Cultural, demographic, historical, political, economic, and physical attributes of the United States interpreted from a geographic perspective. An interpretive-descriptive account of distinctive regions created by the interplay of said attributes. America's status and role in global affairs emphasized throughout the course. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

GEG312 - Geography of Russia in Global Perspective (3 cr.)

Cultural, demographic, historical, political, economic, and physical attributes of Russia interpreted from a geographic and transnational perspective. Russia's status, role, and influence in global affairs and a comparative view of critical contemporary issues. The defining characteristics of Russian culture and life compared to those of other major realms of the world are emphasized throughout the course. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: completion of Social Science requirement in General Education.

GEG314 - Geography of Europe (3 cr.)

Europe and its constituent countries and regions are studied geographically. The environmental, economic, social, cultural, political, and past geographies of Europe are identified and analyzed as they combine to create a variety of landscapes. Most of this course emphasizes contemporary Europe, but there is also considerable content devoted to Europe's past geographies. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Any introductory course in Geography or History.

GEG316 - Geography of Canada (3 cr.)

The interplay of historical, political, economic, cultural and environmental factors that make Canada what it is today. Regional identities within Canada are emphasized. The importance of the American influence on Canada, in a geographical context, is also stressed. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

GEG317 - Geography of South America (3 cr.)

Physical and cultural geographical survey of South America. The historical background of settlement, social and economic foundations, urbanization and contemporary issues of development are covered. Individual countries of South America examined. (Fall). Liberal arts.

GEG319 - Geography of New York State (3 cr.)

Natural environment and historical development of the State are studied with emphasis placed upon the cultural, economic, resource, recreational, urban, transportational and political patterns that have emerged. (Spring). Liberal arts.

GEG320 - Climatology (3 cr.)

Elements and controls of climate (solar radiation, temperature, wind and pressure systems, moisture and precipitation, air masses and fronts, atmospheric disturbances). World pattern of climate stressed (regional analysis). Field trips. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEG120.

GEG331 - Recreation and Tourism Geography (3 cr.)

Geography of recreation and tourism; examples of uses, abuses and conservation of recreational resources. Nature and distribution of recreation resources. Special emphasis on national parks and other amenity resources. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: any introductory course in geography, environmental science, biology, or anthropology.

GEG332 - Environmental Justice (3 cr.)

Globalization has produced distinct environmental issues and movements throughout the world. This course will compare the global environmental notions and movements that have developed in the North and South as well as within the U.S. It will explore the political ecology of environmental issues and the way in which race, class, and gender have shaped environmentalism within the United States. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG121 or ENV101 or POI.

GEG335 - Geography of Southeast Asia (3 cr.)

The region of Southeast Asia and its countries are studied as a geographical system. The environmental components, including landforms, climates, biography and water sources, and the human geographical elements of the region, including the historical economic, cultural, and political geographies are examined to understand the region's landscapes and changes. The primary focus is on the contemporary patterns of the area, but evolutionary processes of change are also studied. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or POI.

GEG340 - Computer Application in Geography (3 cr.)

Introduction to how technology has changed techniques and methods in geography. Emphasis on spreadsheets and computer graphics, geographic report preparation, image acquisition and use (scanning, digitizing, the internet and World Wide Web), location finding and route planning, field mapping and global positioning systems (GPS), computer mapping, digital mapping, and geographic information systems (GIS). The preparation of geographic reports using these skills will be emphasized. This course is a requirement for geography majors, but will also be valuable for other majors such as geology and environment science. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: basic computer literacy.

GEG345 - The Adirondacks: An Historical Geography (3 cr.)

Evolution of geographic patterns of human endeavors from initial exploration through mid-twentieth century. Settlement, population, transportation, economic activities, ethnicity and cultural landscapes emphasized. Field trips to Great Camps, former mining and mill towns, abandoned farms, mines, cemeteries, resort hotels and the Adirondack Museum at Blue Mountain Lake. (Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior standing

GEG350 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Mapping (3 cr.)

Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS), map design, and ArcView GIS software licensed by Environmental Systems Research Institute. Students will prepare maps and store, retrieve, and analyze spatial data. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: GEG120 or GEL101 or POI.

GEG350R - Geographic Information System/Mapping Recitation (0 cr.)

Students registering for GEG350 must register for the corresponding GEG350R recitation section.

GEG360 - Global Field Study (3 to 6 cr.)

This course includes both classroom meetings and field-based study in a foreign country to examine the relations between the global-system and local communities. Topics include globalization, cross-cultural understanding, economic development, environmental issues and political power. Students will learn to critically evaluate responsible citizenship within a global community. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or POI.

GEG370 - Exploring sub-Saharan Africa (3 cr.)

An in-depth geographic study of Africa south of the Sahara Desert. Surveys physical geography, natural resources, history, cultures, demography, political geography, economic activities and current issues of African states south of the Sahara. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

GEG399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

GEG431 - Recreational Land Use Planning (3 cr.)

Planning process; basics and specifics of recreational land use planning. Recreational land use plan will be prepared for sites in Northeastern New York. Field trips. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG303; GEG331 or ENV310.

GEG432 - Environmental Governance (3 cr.)

The course focuses on the social, economic, legal and political structures that shape our interactions with the environment today. It highlights the interrelations with environmental governance at global, national and local levels. Students will learn how to integrate public participation to address the challenges of environmental governance. Approved AWR. (Every other spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG332 or SOC367.

GEG450 - Geography: Themes and Concepts (3 cr.)

The development, major concepts, and approaches to the study of geography are the main foci for this capstone course. Students will also develop their research and writing skills in geography, and will present their work with both oral and written presentations. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing, LIB101 or LIB102 or LIB105 (or corequisite), GEG120, GEG121, and GEG123 or GEG124.

GEG485 - Sustainable Communities (3 cr.)

The class will examine geospatial networks and planning for sustainable communities through case study research. Students will conduct research on sustainability topics such as food systems, mixed land-use design, green jobs, parks and green space, and bicycles and walkability. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG121 or ENV201 and junior standing.

GEG498 - Practicum in Geography (3 to 12 cr.)

Practical advanced field work under academic supervision. Work with professional groups and agencies such as: Soil Conservation Service, local government and Adirondack Park Agency. Individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: advanced standing, POI.

GEG499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

GEG545 - The Adirondacks: An Historical Geography (3 cr.)

Evolution of geographic patterns of human endeavors from initial exploration through mid-twentieth century. Settlement, population, transportation, economic activities, ethnicity, and cultural landscapes emphasized. Field trips to Great Camps; the Adirondack Museum at Blue Mountain Lake; former mill towns, mining camps, and renowned resort-hotel sites; abandoned iron mines; ghost towns; cemeteries; and selected religious sites (Roman Catholic Church/Shrine and historic Beth Joseph Synagogue. (Summer).

GEG599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

Search the College Course Catalog

Enter a course number or three-letter course subject to search the College Catalog:

Alphabetical Listing of Curriculum Descriptions by Course Subject

A

  • Africana Studies = AAS
  • Accounting = ACC
  • Anthropology = ANT
  • Arabic = ARA
  • Art = ART
  • Asian Studies = ASI
  • Astronomy = AST

B

  • Biology = BIO
  • Business = BUS

C

  • Canadian Studies = CAS
  • Communications Disorders & Sciences = CDS
  • Consumer Economics Management = CEM
  • Chemistry = CHE
  • Counseling = CLG
  • Career Life Planning = CLP
  • Communication Studies = CMM
  • Computer Science = CSC
  • Criminal Justice = CRI

E

  • Economics = ECO
  • Education = EDU
  • Education - Administration = EDA
  • Education - Mathematics = EDM
  • Education - Reading = EDR
  • Education - Special = EDS
  • English = ENG
  • Environmental Science = ENV
  • English as a Second Language = ESL
  • Expeditionary Studies = EXP

F

  • Finance = FIN
  • Foreign Languages & Literature = FLL
  • French = FRE
  • Freshman Seminar = FRS
  • Freshman Experience = FRX

G

  • Geography = GEG
  • Gender & Women's Studies = GWS
  • Geology = GEL
  • German = GER

H

  • Health Education = HED
  • History = HIS
  • Honors = HON
  • Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management = HRT
  • Human Development and Family Relations = HDF

I

  • Interdisciplinary Studies = INT
  • Italian = ITA

J

  • Journalism = JOU

L

  • Latin American Studies = LAS
  • Latin = LAT
  • Leadership = MLS
  • Library Skills = LIB
  • Language & Linguistics = LIN

M

  • Mathematics = MAT
  • Meteorology = MET
  • Military Studies = MTS
  • Management & International Business = MGM
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship = MKE
  • Minority Studies = MNS
  • Music = MUS

N

  • Nursing = NUR
  • Nutrition = FNI

P

  • Physical Education = PED
  • Philosophy = PHI
  • Physics = PHY
  • Portuguese = POR
  • Political Science = PSC
  • Psychology = PSY

R

  • Reading = RDG
  • Recreation = REC
  • Russian = RUS

S

  • Science & Society = SCI
  • Sociology = SOC
  • Spanish = SPA
  • Social Work = SWK

T

  • Theatre = THE
  • Tutor Training = TTR