CHE Courses

CHE100 - Chemistry and Society with Lab (4 cr.)

A selection of topics used as an introduction to chemical principles. Emphasis on chemical applications to technology and the impact of chemistry on society. Examples of topics: Polymers and Plastics; Metabolism and Biomolecules in Our Diet; Nuclear Chemistry; and Health Risk from Chemicals; etc. Taught as a level for the general student population. Students cannot receive credit for both CHE100 and CHE103 or for CHE100 taken after CHE101, 111, or 112. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

CHE101 - General Chemistry (Fall) (4 cr.)

An introduction to chemistry with emphasis on the important principles and facts necessary for comprehension of the structure of matter, the chemical action of common elements and compounds, and basic chemical calculations. NOTE: students may not take both CHE101 and CHE111 for credit. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CHE103 - Chemistry and Society (3 cr.)

A selection of topics used as an introduction to chemical principles. Emphasis on chemical applications to technology and the impact of chemistry on society. Examples of topics: Polymers and Plastics; Metabolism and Biomolecules in Our Diet; Nuclear Chemistry; and Health Risk from Chemicals; etc. Taught as a level for the general student population. Students cannot receive credit for both CHE100 and CHE103 or for CHE100 taken after CHE101, 111, or 112. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

CHE104 - Math Skills for Chemistry (1 cr.)

A comprehensive workshop covering the general math and algebra skills needed to succeed in General Chemistry or Fundamental Principles of Chemistry I. This course is designed to guide the student through the process of learning how to solve the types of problems specific to general chemistry. This includes the use of calculators, order of operations, solving for an unknown variable, solving multiple equations and the use of unit conversion factors. The course is offered during the first five weeks of the fall semester and can be taken concurrently with CHE101 or CHE111. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CHE111 - Fundamental Principles of Chemistry I (4 cr.)

The first semester of a two-semester introduction to general chemistry for science majors. Emphasis will be on the structure of atoms, ionic compounds and molecules, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, periodic trends, properties of gases, models for the electronic structure of atoms and molecules and basic laboratory techniques. Students may not take both CHE101 and CHE111 for credit. Lecture/laboratory. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts.

CHE112 - Fundamental Principles of Chemistry II (4 cr.)

The second semester of a two-semester introduction to general chemistry for science majors. Emphasis will be on the influence of the molecular structure on the properties of solids, liquids and solutions; the properties of solutions; reaction kinetics; acid/base and ionic equilibria; thermodynamics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; and basic laboratory techniques. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in CHE111.

CHE191 - Introductory Seminar in Chemistry (1 cr.)

An entry-level seminar for incoming freshmen and transfer students covering current research and industrial trends and career opportunities in the chemical profession. Industrial contacts through on-campus seminars/field trips. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

CHE199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CHE240 - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (5 cr.)

A one-semester introduction to organic chemistry. Emphasis on hydrocarbons, aromatics, alkyl halides, alcohol, ethers, the carbonyl group, biomolecules and spectroscopic structure determination. Lecture and laboratory. This course does not serve as a prereq for CHE242. Not open for credit to students who have completed CHE241 or CHE271. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in CHE112.

CHE241 - Organic Chemistry I (4 cr.)

Saturated, unsaturated, and aromatic hydrocarbons; alkylhalides: their reactions, structure and reaction mechanisms. Stereochemistry, mass spectrometry and UV spectroscopy. (Cannot receive credit for CHE241 and CHE240 or CHE271). (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE112.

CHE242 - Organic Chemistry II (4 cr.)

Alcohol, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, phenols, carbohydrates and amino acids, their reactions, structure, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, IR and NMR spectroscopy. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE241.

CHE271 - Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (4 cr.)

Integration of topics from the fields of organic chemistry and biochemistry to provide the student with a basic understanding of the processes of life at the molecular level. Students cannot receive credit for CHE271 if they have completed a semester of organic chemistry, CHE371, or CHE401. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE101 with a grade of C or higher.

CHE299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CHE307 - Geochemistry (3 cr.)

Origin of the elements and chemical differentiation of the Earth. Isotope geochemistry and geochronology including both radiogenic and stable isotope systems. Applications of geochemistry to the solution of global environmental problems such as radioactive waste disposal. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE112 and GEL101.

CHE308 - Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)

The study of chemical phenomena in the environment. Focus on natural chemical processes in water, air and soil systems; chemical contaminants that pollute these systems; principles of chemical kinetics and equilibria applied to quantitative description of the chemistry of natural systems. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE240 or CHE241.

CHE309 - Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1 cr.)

Methods of characterization of air, soil and water samples; data analysis and computer modeling of environmental systems, field trip(s) to water treatment facilities. One three-hour lab a week. (Spring). Liberal arts. Recommended corequisite: CHE308.

CHE321 - Analytical Chemistry (5 cr.)

A survey of theoretical principles and practical aspects of classical methods in chemical quantitative (volumetric, gravimetric) analysis. An introduction to some common instrumental methods (spectroscopy, electrochemistry, separations). Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: minimum grade of C in CHE112, and MAT224 (or MAT221).

CHE325 - Culinary Chemistry: Molecular Gastronomy (3 cr.)

Cooking is the oldest application of chemistry. This course will engage students in the exploration of the principles of chemistry and biochemistry involved in the preparation of food and drink. In class demonstrations will illustrate many chemical principles such as extraction, denaturation of proteins and phase changes and show how chefs exert exquisite control over chemical reactions to create gourmet meals. We will also explore how technology has impacted the food industry and how this is important for the health and welfare of our society. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE112, and CHE240 or CHE241 or POI.

CHE360 - Computational Chemistry (2 cr.)

An introduction to computational chemistry, covering basic quantum mechanics, a variety of computational methods, and their applications. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE112, MAT225.

CHE361 - Computational Chemistry (2 cr.)

An introduction to computational chemistry; covering basic quantum mechanics, a variety of computational methods, and their applications. Lecture/Lab. (Spring). Prerequisites: CHE112, MAT225

CHE371 - General Biochemistry (4 cr.)

An introduction to the biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids and biopolymers. A general view of basic cell metabolism and its regulation. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE240 or CHE242.

CHE391 - Written and Oral Reports (3 cr.)

The techniques of communicating ideas and the information in chemistry using proper scientific style. Written/oral assignments will include research proposals, laboratory notebooks, research progress reports, literature searches, and seminar reviews. Students are required to submit a formal proposal to the Department for their research project if they are pursuing a B.S. in the chemistry program. Assistance in writing is done in a multiple draft/revision process to encourage the development of a style that is appropriate for the chemistry professional. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing and completion of 16 credits of CHE courses.

CHE399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CHE401 - Biochemistry I (3 cr.)

The physical and chemical properties of biologically important compounds and their role in biochemical functions in living systems. The relationship between structure and function and the mechanism of control and regulation of biochemical function. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE240 or CHE242 (BIO 101-BIO102 recommended).

CHE402 - Biochemistry II (3 cr.)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence in biochemistry for undergraduate students. Comprehensive survey of the major topics in biochemistry: metabolism, regulation of biochemical processes, and information transfer. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE401, CHE371 or equivalent.

CHE405 - Mini Topics in Chemistry (1 cr.)

Advanced topics in chemistry selected by the instructor. Examples of topics: Chemical Information, Glass Blowing, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification, Polymer Chemistry, Nanoscience, Organometallic Chemistry, etc. Course format can be lecture or laboratory. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior standing.

CHE421 - Instrumental Analysis (4 cr.)

A survey of theoretical principles and practical aspects of instrumental methods in chemical analysis with emphasis on their advantages and limitations in identification and quantitative determination of chemical compounds. Discussion on applications of spectroscopic, chromatographic and electrochemical techniques in resolving problems encountered in inorganic, organic, physical and biochemistry. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PHY112; CHE321 or CHE242; and MAT225 or MAT222.

CHE430 - Inorganic Chemistry I (4 cr.)

Advanced consideration of atomic properties, bonding theories, molecular structure, symmetry analysis, group theory manipulations, acid/base theory, liquid theory, and descriptive chemistry. Lecture and Lab. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE242, MAT225, PHY112.

CHE431 - Inorganic Chemistry II (4 cr.)

Integration of bonding concepts, reaction mechanism formalisms, thermochemical concepts and kinetics in the elucidation of inorganic reaction systems. Systems include coordination, organometallic and bioinorganic systems, application of synthetic and instrumental techniques to the laboratory study of inorganic, organometallic and bioinorganic compounds. Lecture/laboratory. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE430. Corequisites: CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE435 - Topics in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.)

Consideration of topics in inorganic such as: organometallic structure, bonding and reactivity; bioinorganic models, enzymatic processes with metalloenzymes; solid-state chemistry; nanoscience; group theory and chemistry of the main group elements. Topics chosen by instructor. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE431 and CHE452 or CHE456.

CHE442 - Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 cr.)

A physical organic approach to structure and reactions. Advanced Organic Chemistry covers topics including bonding, stereochemistry, carbanions, carbocations, radical processes, functional groups, sophisticated mechanistic schemes, structure reactivity studies, retro-synthetic techniques, and rearrangement reactions. Spectral identification including 2D NMR, IR and MS will be explored as well. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry II (CHE242), Physical Chemistry II (CHE456) or CHE452.

CHE451 - Physical Chemistry I (3 cr.)

The first semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for majors other than chemistry (biochemistry or other majors). Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this first-semester course is on gas laws; work; heat capacity; general thermodynamics; equilibria and rates; and, mechanisms associated with kinetics. This is a lecture only course. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE242, MAT225, and PHY112.

CHE452 - Physical Chemistry II (3 cr.)

The second semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for majors other than chemistry (biochemistry or other majors). Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this second-semester course is on solution chemistry, electrochemistry; quantum mechanics; and spectroscopy. This is a lecture only course. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE455 - Physical Chemistry with Laboratory I (4 cr.)

The first semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for chemistry majors. Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this first-semester course is on gas laws, work, heat capacity; general thermodynamics; equilibria and rates; and mechanisms associated with kinetics. This is a lecture only course with an accompanying laboratory component. (Fall). Liberal arts. Corequisite: CHE455L. Prerequisites: CHE242, MAT225 and PHY112.

CHE456 - Physical Chemistry with Laboratory II (4 cr.)

The second semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for chemistry majors. Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this second-semester course is on solution chemistry, electrochemistry, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. This is a lecture course with an accompanying laboratory component. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE481 - Biochemistry Laboratory I (1 cr.)

An introduction to experimental methods of modern biochemistry which may include: spectrophotometry, liquid scintillation spectroscopy, fluorescence, chromatography, enzymology, and protein and/or nucleic acid isolation and purification. The course is designed to lead to independent biochemical investigation via group projects and gradual reduction of detailed instruction. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE401, which may be taken concurrently.

CHE482 - Biochemistry Laboratory II (1 cr.)

A detailed examination of experimental methods of modern biochemistry which may include: spectroscopy, chromatography, electrophoresis, western blots, molecular modeling and genetic engineering using PCR methods. The course is designed to encourage independent biochemical investigation via small group projects. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE401 and CHE481, or CHE371 with permission from instructor.

CHE485 - Physical Biochemistry (3 cr.)

Topics covered include: protein architecture and folding; nucleic acid structures and energetics; structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR; biological spectroscopy with emphasis on absorption, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies; and the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein-ligand interactions. Extended topics will include proteomics, biocalorimetry, hydrodynamics and fourier transform mass spectrometry. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT222 or MAT225, CHE242.

CHE491 - Chemistry Seminar (1 cr.)

Detailed discussions of contemporary topics prepared and presented by the students. Students pursuing the B.S. program in chemistry are expected to present the results of their independent research project as well as the scientific context for the problem studied. Attention given to the details of selecting, preparing, and presenting a scientific topic. Discussion and critique of presentations. Cannot be challenged. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior standing, CHE391 and CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE495 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Laboratory research project individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. Formal reports of research results within the context of previous scientific work are required to be submitted to the sponsor and the department at the completion of the work. Approval for the proposed experience is obtained following established Arts and Science procedures. Course may be repeated. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 2.67 major GPA.

CHE496 - Laboratory Teaching Experience I/II (1 to 3 cr.)

Planning of a lesson, preparation of laboratory materials, chemical demonstrations, and expositions of laboratory protocols in conjunction with a laboratory instructor. Learning objective and valid assessment development. Formal written report for department and sponsor is required at the end of the experience describing how the course learning objectives were achieved. May be repeated once as CHE496: Teaching Experience II. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing or above; minimum GPA in major of 3.0; POI; permission of chair of the department.

CHE498 - Internship (1 to 3 cr.)

Practical field experience in an area of chemical or biochemical study. Learning outcomes developed in agreement between faculty sponsor and field supervisor. Appropriate application material including a comprehensive learning contract and a final written report to the department and faculty sponsor is required. Note: each credit hour requires three hours of on-site experience.

CHE499 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Library-based research project or independent course tutorial individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. If library-based, a formal report of the results within the context of previous scientific work is required to be submitted to the sponsor and the department at the completion of the work. Approval for the proposed experience is obtained following established Arts and Science procedures. Course may be repeated. Liberal arts.

CHE501 - Biochemistry I (3 cr.)

The molecular nature of life, and the structure and chemistry of the four classes of biomolecules: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and nucleic acids. Integration of chemical and biological principles in understanding the theoretical underpinnings of the field. Students that took CHE401 as an undergraduate may not get credit for this course. (Fall). Prerequisites: CHE240 or CHE242 or equivalent; BIO101 or equivalent recommended.

CHE502 - Biochemistry II (3 cr.)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence in biochemistry for graduate students. Survey of the major topics in biochemistry: biological processes in chemical terms; metabolism, and chemical regulation, and information transfer. Students that took CHE402 as an undergraduate may not get credit for this course. (Spring). Prerequisites: CHE501 or equivalent or POI.

CHE505 - Mini-Topics in Chemistry (1 to 2 cr.)

Advanced topics in chemistry selected by the instructor. Integration of core concepts required to address chemical problems appropriate to a graduate level. Examples of topics: Advanced Pulsing Techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Polymer Chemistry, Nanoscience, Organomettalic Chemistry, Biosynthesis, Computational Chemistry, etc. Course can be lecture or laboratory.

CHE521 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry (4 cr.)

An advanced comprehensive survey of theoretical principles and practical aspects of analytical chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the complexity of analytical methods of various instrumental techniques in identification and quantitative determination of chemical compounds. In depth discussion on applications of instrumental methods and their use in experiments designed to resolve problems encountered in inorganic, physical and biochemistry. Credit may not be received for CHE521 if student received credit for CHE421.

CHE535 - Topics in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.)

Selected topics in advanced inorganic chemistry from such areas as: organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic, nanoscience, solid state chemistry. In addition to lecture course work, the student will be expected to select a problem within the inorganic area and produce a detailed analysis of it as well as a proposal on experiments that could enhance the understanding of the problem. Students who have taken CHE435 for credit cannot receive credit for CHE535. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CHE431 and CHE452 or CHE456 or comparable undergraduate courses.

CHE585 - Physical Biochemistry (3 cr.)

An advanced course in the physical properties of biological macromolecules and the methods used to analyze their structure and function. Topics covered include: protein architecture and folding; nucleic acid structures and energetics; structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR; biological spectroscopy with emphasis on absorption, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies; and the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein-ligand interactions. Extended topics will include proteomics, biocalorimetry, hydrodynamics and fourier transform mass spectrometry. It is expected that students will be exposed to all of the areas covered in physical chemistry with a biological flavor and will appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of this topic. A special topic paper and presentation will be expected as part of the required work. Students that took CHE485 as an undergraduate may not get credit for this course. (Spring). Prerequisite: undergraduate biochemistry course equivalent to CHE401 or permission of the instructor.

CHE595 - Graduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Laboratory research project individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. Designed as a vehicle for students to complete the necessary laboratory work for a Master's Thesis or "significant" research paper. Approval for the proposed experience is obtained following established Arts and Science procedures. Course may be repeated.

CHE596 - Chemistry Teaching Practicum (3 cr.)

Design of a college-level laboratory experience including: course syllabus; schedule; content; lesson plans; demonstrations; lectures; assessment design, teaching; and grading. Design created and executed in close consultation with a faculty mentor. Course requires the approval of the sponsor, chairperson, and Dean. Appropriate Arts and Science approval forms required. May be repeated for up to 6 credits. Requires weekly laboratory instruction.

Search the College Course Catalog

Enter a course number or three-letter curriculum code to search the College Catalog:

Alphabetical Listing of Curriculum Descriptions by Course Subject

A

  • Africana Studies = AAS
  • Accounting = ACC
  • Anthropology = ANT
  • Arabic = ARA
  • Art = ART
  • Asian Studies = ASI
  • Astronomy = AST

B

  • Biology = BIO
  • Business = BUS

C

  • Canadian Studies = CAS
  • Communications Disorders & Sciences = CDS
  • Consumer Economics Management = CEM
  • Chemistry = CHE
  • Counseling = CLG
  • Career Life Planning = CLP
  • Communication Studies = CMM
  • Computer Science = CSC
  • Criminal Justice = CRI

E

  • Economics = ECO
  • Education = EDU
  • Education - Administration = EDA
  • Education - Mathematics = EDM
  • Education - Reading = EDR
  • Education - Special = EDS
  • English = ENG
  • Environmental Science = ENV
  • English as a Second Language = ESL
  • Expeditionary Studies = EXP

F

  • Finance = FIN
  • Foreign Languages & Literature = FLL
  • French = FRE
  • Freshman Seminar = FRS
  • Freshman Experience = FRX

G

  • Geography = GEG
  • Gender & Women's Studies = GWS
  • Geology = GEL
  • German = GER

H

  • Health Education = HED
  • History = HIS
  • Honors = HON
  • Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management = HRT
  • Human Development and Family Relations = HDF

I

  • Interdisciplinary Studies = INT
  • Italian = ITA

J

  • Journalism = JOU

L

  • Latin American Studies = LAS
  • Latin = LAT
  • Leadership = MLS
  • Library Skills = LIB
  • Language & Linguistics = LIN

M

  • Mathematics = MAT
  • Meteorology = MET
  • Military Studies = MTS
  • Management & International Business = MGM
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship = MKE
  • Minority Studies = MNS
  • Music = MUS

N

  • Nursing = NUR
  • Nutrition = FNI

P

  • Physical Education = PED
  • Philosophy = PHI
  • Physics = PHY
  • Portuguese = POR
  • Political Science = PSC
  • Psychology = PSY

R

  • Reading = RDG
  • Recreation = REC
  • Russian = RUS

S

  • Science & Society = SCI
  • Sociology = SOC
  • Spanish = SPA
  • Social Work = SWK

T

  • Theatre = THE
  • Tutor Training = TTR