Courses

AAS103 - Roots and Culture: The African-American Experience (3 cr.)

An introductory survey course that will provide students with an understanding of continuity and change within the African-American experience. Students will explore key political and cultural events and ideas within the framework of American history. Class, gender, caste, and sexual orientation issues are integrated throughout the course work. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

AAS201 - African-American Family Culture (3 cr.)

This course represents an historical examination of the evolution of the African-American family. The course begins with an examination of slavery and its impact of the African-American family and ends with a discussion of contemporary misogyny, violence, and popular culture as they relate to the African-American family. Parallels are drawn between the sociological and political issues surrounding masculinity, femininity, disenfranchisement, and hip-hop culture and the effect that these have on the African-American family. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: AAS103 or SOC101 or GWS101 or POI.

AAS202 - Great Afro-American Literature (3 cr.)

An examination of Afro-American literature: poetry, novels, autobiography and criticism. A study of peculiarities of form that can be ascribed specifically to Afro-American culture highlighting the richness of its literature. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

AAS203 - Civilizations and Cultures of Southern Africa (3 cr.)

A survey of Southern African civilizations and cultures from the 15th century through the present. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

AAS207 - Inside Africa (3 cr.)

A course reviewing contemporary Africa in the context of both the developing and industrialized worlds. A critical examination of 21st Century Sub-Saharan Africa, and an exploration of the processes by which the current situation has occurred, the historical and present crises, as well as the successes and triumphs of the continent. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

AAS209 - African Cinema (3 cr.)

A topical examination of contemporary African societies and cultures as expressed through the camera lens. Intensive study of selected films on the dynamics of change, gender issues, migrations, conflicts, globalization, and marginalization. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

AAS211 - African Insurgency (3 cr.)

An interdisciplinary course reviewing culture, identity, politics, tradition, wars and warlords in modern Africa. An examination of the origins and spread of current "low-intensity" conflicts in Africa, and how unfinished agendas held in abeyance since independence are finally playing out. A look at an era that is by no means likely to end soon and the dynamics of unrest that in many cases are still imperfectly understood. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

AAS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. Can be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

AAS305 - Afro-Caribbean Civilization (3 cr.)

Afro-Caribbean Civilizations introduces students to the history and culture of this geographically fragmented region and its representations in international culture. Comparative discussions of art and literature of the African Diaspora from a number of Caribbean islands introduce the multicultural societies of the region. Discussion topics include society, popular culture, and politics. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: AAS201 or ANT102 or GEG121 or HIS101 or HIS102 or PSC100 or SOC101.

AAS306 - Afro-American Cultures since 1865: Reconstruction - Present (3 cr.)

A general study of major political, social and economic developments within the Afro-American community. (occasional). Liberal arts.

AAS334 - The African Francophone Novel (3 cr.)

An intensive examination of classical texts from twentieth century and contemporary African writings aimed at highlighting their particularities in expressing the colonial experience and its aftermath. Explores manifestations of traditional narrative forms in the modern novel and seeks to introduce students to the contributions of the most consequential French-speaking writers from the African continent. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

AAS390 - Special Topics (Title Varies) (3 cr.)

Coverage of significant topics in African American Studies. Provides students with an opportunity to study topics not presented in depth in other courses. May be repeated with different topics to a maximum of six credits. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: AAS103 or AAS202.

AAS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. Can be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

AAS496 - Instructional Practicum (3 cr.)

Assist instructor in planning, preparation, class discussions, tutoring, and/or group projects/presentations. Pass/fail grade. May be repeated to a maximum of three credits. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI, grade of B or better in course in which student will work, upper-level status.

AAS498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

Can be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

AAS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. May be repeated for a maximum of 15 credits.

ACC199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ACC201 - Introduction to Financial Accounting (3 cr.)

This is a course study that introduces financial accounting and financial reporting for business entities. It offers an introduction to accounting information systems with emphasis on measuring, reporting, and using accounting information related to operating, investing, and financing activities, and involves detailed discussion of accounting concepts and issues concerning the financial position, income statement, statement of stockholders' equity and statement of cash flows. (Fall/Spring).

ACC202 - Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3 cr.)

This is a course of study that introduces managerial accounting for business entities. It offers an introduction to managerial accounting topics including cost analysis, cost allocation, job order and process costing systems, activity-based-costing, cost-volume-profit analysis, short-run decision making, budgeting, standard costing and variance analysis, capital budgeting decisions, and financial statement analysis. Accounting ethics and values are also emphasized. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisite: ACC201.

ACC299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ACC301 - Intermediate Accounting I (3 cr.)

The valuation of current assets, investments, plant and equipment, current liabilities, and their relationship with business net income. (Fall). Prerequisite: ACC202.

ACC302 - Intermediate Accounting II (3 cr.)

Continuation of ACC301. Liabilities, stockholder's equity, and the statement of cash flows, income tax accounting, pensions and leases. (Spring). Prerequisite: ACC301.

ACC305 - Cost Accounting (3 cr.)

Principles under which cost data are accumulated and communicated for managerial planning and control. Planning and control of materials, labor and factory overhead, determination of unit costs, process costs and job costs, standard costing, direct costing and cost-volume- profit analysis. (Spring). Prerequisites: ACC202 or POI.

ACC306 - Accounting Information Systems (3 cr.)

The analysis, design and control of accounting and other information systems with an emphasis on current issues and concerns. (Fall). Prerequisites: ACC301 and ACC305 or POI.

ACC307 - Government and Nonprofit Accounting (3 cr.)

Concepts and principles of accounting applicable to governmental and nonprofit entities including fund accounting, budgeting and financial reporting. (Fall). Prerequisite: ACC202.

ACC351 - Legal Environment of Business (3 cr.)

The impact of regulation by state and federal governments upon individuals, corporations, and not-for-profit organizations in such areas as product liability, discrimination, unfair labor practices, pollution and consumer protection. Rights and responsibilities of the individual regarding contracts, torts and litigation. Ethical, social and political implications are explored as an integral part of each topic area. (Fall/Spring).

ACC352 - Business Law for Accounting Majors (3 cr.)

Designed for accounting students who intend to become certified public accountants. An in-depth examination of the more traditional areas of business law including contracts, sales, commercial paper, real and personal property, corporations, partnerships, bankruptcy and the legal and ethical responsibilities of the CPA. (Spring). Prerequisite: ACC351

ACC377 - International Accounting (3 cr.)

Accounting problems encountered in multinational business operations; differences in accounting principles among trading and investing countries; interactive tax systems and intercountry transfers and cost allocations. (Spring). Prerequisites: ACC202, ECO111

ACC399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ACC401 - Advanced Accounting (3 cr.)

Advanced financial accounting measurement and reporting issues including the following topics: mergers and acquisitions; consolidated financial statement; partnerships; governmental and not for profit organizations; accounting for financially distressed firms; foreign currency financial statements and foreign currency transactions. (Fall). Prerequisite: ACC302.

ACC402 - Auditing (3 cr.)

Course consists of two major sections: a comprehensive conceptual understanding of the nature and purpose of auditing; the logical extension of the concepts to specific areas. (Spring). Prerequisites: ACC302, ECO260, and ACC306 or POI.

ACC403 - Income Tax I (3 cr.)

The federal tax laws with emphasis on the individual taxpayer. The preparation and filing of tax returns. (Fall). Prerequisite: ACC202.

ACC404 - Income Tax II (3 cr.)

The federal tax laws as applied to corporations, Subchapter S corporations, and partnerships, including the preparation of tax returns. Theory of the tax laws as they apply to gift and estate taxation and family tax planning. (Spring). Prerequisite: ACC403.

ACC406 - Accounting Theory and Research (3 cr.)

Current issues in accounting theory and practices. Purpose is to synthesize students' knowledge of accounting and to probe into the rationale behind accounting theory and practices. (Spring). Prerequisites: ACC302 or POI.

ACC499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ANT101 - Introduction to Human Evolution (3 cr.)

An exploration of the scientific evidence related to the origins and evolution of human beings. Topics include the theories and processes of biological evolution, the biological and cultural bases of human variation, humans compared to other primates, and the fossil and archaeological record of human evolution over millions of years. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

ANT102 - Comparative Cultures (3 cr.)

Introduction to and comparison of a variety of world cultures as a means of introducing the approaches and methods of cultural anthropology. Exposure to the intellectual and practical problems cultural anthropologists encounter and the kinds of solutions they propose. Exploration of a wide range of concepts and topics, including culture, ethnocentrism, cultural relativism, reflexivity, social organization, gender, ideologies, subsistence patterns and technology, violence and warfare, poverty, hunger, and inequality. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ANT104 - Great Archaeological Discoveries (3 cr.)

An introductory exploration of some of the major archaeological discoveries from around the globe that have helped shape our knowledge and understanding of the human past. Specific finds and sites will illustrate the varied, distinctive features and achievements of pre-industrial, non-Western cultures, as well as reflecting the intrigue and approaches involved in reconstructing and interpreting the evolution of human beings and their societies. Consideration is also given to the endangerment and conservation of important sites and monuments. (Fall/Spring). Liberal Arts.

ANT199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ANT220 - Archaeology (3 cr.)

Introduction to method and theory of archaeology. Principles of site survey and excavation; techniques for dating prehistoric and reconstructing past environments; interpretations of social, economic, and ideological organization from archaeological remains; reconstruction of prehistoric events, and theoretical applications of archaeology to problems of culture change. Ethics of archaeological investigation. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

ANT299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ANT301 - "Race" and Human Variation (3 cr.)

The patterns and causes of biological variation among humans. Historical patterns of migration and adaptation to a variety of natural and cultural environments. The adaptive value of specific variations. Race, behavior and intelligence. Biological variation and racism. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT101 or any biology course.

ANT303 - Sexuality and Culture (3 cr.)

Sexuality in the evolution of culture. Cross-cultural perspectives on sexual expression and practices, including an examination of sexual attitudes and behavior in contemporary culture. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ANT307 - Tibet and the Himalayas (3 cr.)

Tibetan culture and identity from before the takeover by Communist China in the 1950s to the present. Social, cultural and political life in pre-Communist era Tibet. Life of Tibetans in exile. Tibetan populations in the Himalayas. Tibet in the Western imagination. The exporting of Buddhism to the West. The contemporary political situation and the place of Tibetans in the larger world with particular attention to global processes. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT102 or POI.

ANT308 - Forensic Anthropology (3 cr.)

Introduction to the uses of anthropology in the investigation of human remains associated with unexplained deaths, including those from crime scenes, with a focus on skeletal remains. Topics include archaeological aspects of data recovery, and physical anthropology techniques used in identifying age, sex, stature, "race" and individual identity as well as analysis of trauma, pathology, cause of death and time elapsed since death. Course includes lab practicum with skeletons. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT101 or SOC150 or SOC250 or any biology course.

ANT310 - Language and Culture (3 cr.)

Structure, patterns and regularities of language, comparing the language families and showing the mutual influence of language and culture. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT102.

ANT316 - Intercultural Communication (3 cr.)

Drawing upon various theories and empirical generalizations about how cultural differences manifest, the course examines various roles that the concept of culture plays in a human communication process. After reviewing differences and similarities in communication behaviors as demonstrated by individuals belonging to a variety of different cultural and sub-cultural systems, the course analyzes a variety of different patterns of interaction among those individuals both in the culturally-diverse United States and in the rapidly-globalizing world community. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM226 or CMM288 or ANT102 or POI.

ANT317 - Political Anthropology (3 cr.)

Political organization in historical and cultural contexts and its relative implications for social justice issues. Comparative, ethnographic study of the range of political organization found across human societies. Investigation of political interaction and processes from multiple dimensions, such as the role of myth and symbols, rituals, political language and rhetoric, issues of power relations, authority, and conflict. Critical appraisal of modern political organization and institutions at local, international and transnational levels. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite ANT102 or any introductory course in political science, sociology, or history.

ANT318 - Anthropology of Human Rights (3 cr.)

An exploration of the historical, cultural, political and legal parameters associated with human rights at local, national, regional, and international levels. Issues addressed include the evolution of the global human rights regime since its inception following WWII to the present, and the way that human rights serve as a medium of social and political power. The consequences for human rights of the 9/11/01 terrorist attacks on the U.S. are also assessed. At a more local level, human rights are considered from the standpoint of ethical action in relation to poverty and health care, refugee rights, and undocumented residents, and asylum claimants. (Every three to four semesters). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT102 or any other introductory social science or history course.

ANT323 - Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3 cr.)

Introduction to the diversity and complexity of peoples and cultures throughout Latin America. Specific focus will be on the intersection of politics, religion, gender, race, class, ethnicity, human rights and nationalism in post-colonial Latin America. Critical exploration of global processes and how current cultural, political and economic transformations are impacting indigenous peoples and various sectors of Latin American society. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: ANT102 or LAS111 or HIS161 or HIS162 or AAS305 or POI.

ANT328 - Archaeological Site Excavation (6 cr.)

Excavation of an actual archaeological site in the Plattsburgh area. Practical experience in field archaeology including techniques of survey, excavation, preservation, reconstruction and laboratory analysis of artifactual materials. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Liberal arts. (Summer). Prerequisite: POI.

ANT332 - Mortuary Archaeology (3 cr.)

Death is the great leveler, and the recognition and memorialization of death is a human universal. The way in which ancient and modern human societies experience the death process is culturally defined. This course will examine a number of prehistoric, historic and modern case studies, and see how humans individually and collectively ritualize the death process. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ANT101 or ANT102 or ANT220 or ANT104.

ANT333 - Coastal and Aquatic Archaeology (3 cr.)

A study of ancient human-environment interaction in coastal, marine, and freshwater ecosystems. Archaeological and ecological exploration of the relationship between cultural and natural systems. An examination of ancient human impacts to coastal ecosystems and their relationship to modern ecological issues. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ANT101 or ANT102 or ANT104 or ANT220.

ANT335 - Plagues, People, and History (3 cr.)

This course will examine epidemic diseases within a biological and historical context. Topics covered include catastrophic infectious disease and the human body's response, biological change over time, how scientists discovered the causes and developed controls for infectious disease, and the ways in which plagues and human culture interact to shape societal values, traditions, and institutions. Issues such as the impact of sedentism, malnutrition, disease constructs, warfare, and poverty on the behavior of infectious pathogens will be covered, including examples from Ancient (Greek, Roman, Egyptian), Medieval and Modern Ages. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ANT101 or ANT102 or BIO101 or BIO102 or HIS121 or HIS122 or HIS285.

ANT336 - Civilization and Health (3 cr.)

Examination of the relationship between cultural/biological factors and human health and disease, including topics such as group structure and size, the transition from hunter/gatherers (nomadism) to agriculturalists (sedentism), the rise of urban society, and the environmental and social factors that accompany different economic strategies. Problems of nutrition in the past and the evolution and history of infectious diseases will be examined as well as the recent emergence of new diseases. Methods of analyzing prehistoric health, and the problems with these methods, will be discussed. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT101 or ANT102

ANT337 - Israeli Culture and Society (3 cr.)

Cultural, social, and political development of modern Israel. Emphases on western ideological basis of Zionism and the Israeli political system, cultural diversity and conflict, internal social dynamics and regional political relations. Historical, religious, economic, and political factors as bases of contemporary Israeli culture and lifestyles. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

ANT338 - Illness and Healing (3 cr.)

Anthropological approaches in the study of illness and caring. The interaction between human behavior and the ecology of various diseases. Common cultural and psychodynamic features of illness. The nature and efficacy of non-Western curing procedures. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT101 or ANT102.

ANT340 - Culture and Belief (3 cr.)

This course combines features of a traditional anthropology of religion course with that of science studies, and examines how human beings come to construct their characteristic view of the world. It will examine the role of language and mind in the construction of belief systems, discuss the role of ritual, magic and myth in reinforcing world views. It will examine how belief systems are maintained in spite of apparent contradictions and ambiguities and outline the role of patterns of social relationships in the construction of belief. Examples of belief systems will be drawn from non-Western systems of thought, major world religions, and the history of science. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: ANT102 or POI.

ANT349 - Middle Eastern Cultures (3 cr.)

Contemporary sociocultural systems of North Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and Southwest Asia with an emphasis on Islamic cultures. Ecological and historical bases of contemporary cultures and the contribution of village, nomadic, and urban ways of life to Middle Eastern civilization. Relationship of the Middle East to European and Euro-American civilizations. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT102 or sophomore standing.

ANT354 - Education and Culture (Spring) (3 cr.)

Transmission of knowledge, values, attitudes and behavior patterns to new members of social groups. Cross-cultural regularities in socialization and schooling. Contemporary American education in anthropological perspective. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT102.

ANT359 - Ecology, Systems and Culture (3 cr.)

Theory and application of cultural ecology as an approach to studying culture as an adaptive mechanism. Systems theory used to analyze the interrelationship of such factors as environment, technology, subsistence activities, culture change and cultural evolution. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT101 or ANT102.

ANT362 - Anthropological Perspectives: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Application of anthropological perspectives to issues affecting humans in most societies. Specific focus on violence, poverty, deviance, gender, ethnicity, environmental degradation, development and indigenous people, food systems and hunger. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT102 or social science general education requirement or POI.

ANT368 - Anthropology of Food (3 cr.)

Food and its availability and production have, throughout history, defined who we are. The world is full of eatable things: but every culture defines for itself what in that world of eatable things is acceptable and what is not. Food, in other words, is a cultural creation. How food is produced, prepared and served and who is responsible for it, also varies from culture to culture as is its ceremonial importance. The past two centuries has seen a revolution in how food is prepared and distributed, as well as how people relate to food. And, of course, various food disorders from anorexia to obesity partially define our relationship to what and how much we eat. This course will examine all these issues and more. (every two years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ANT102 or POI.

ANT375 - West Asia: Culture & Conflict (3 cr.)

Overview of the cultural and political systems of West Asia (sometimes referred to as the Levant) with particular emphasis on ethnic diversity and propensity to conflict in the region both inter- and intra-state. The role of culture in the maintenance of violence and creation of political identity. Focus on Lebanon, Jordan, Syria, Israel, Palestine, and Iraq. Topics include ethnic violence, terrorism, insurgency, the Palestinian-Israel Conflict, Lebanese Civil War, the U.S. invasion of Iraq, and the Gulf War. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ANT102 or other social science or history course.

ANT377 - Immigrants, Exiles, Refugees, and Transnational Communities (3 cr.)

This course explores the global forces that are driving contemporary movements of people across international borders and the transnational communities that result. anthropological case studies from Latin America, the United States, Canada, Europe, Africa, and Asia provide students with a critical understanding of the qualitative experiences of transnational and forced migration, or displacement, on origin, and countries of settlement. The course will consider the social, cultural, political, and economic contexts in which the population movements occur, as well as the complex cultural and political processes associated with integration, assimilation, alienation, deportation, and repatriation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ANT102 or HIS132 or PSC220 or LAS111 or CAS111 or POI.

ANT380 - Doing Anthropology (3 cr.)

An exploration of the practical and theoretical foundations for conducting ethnographic research, including the fieldwork methods used by cultural anthropologists, ethical issues in research and writing, and an introduction to anthropological theory. Readings will expose students to a variety of ethnographic research and writing styles. Writing assignments will provide practice on research methods, including taking field notes, a variety of interview formats, and trained observation. Additional skills to be emphasized include appropriate library and electronic research, and writing research questions and proposals. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: six credits in cultural anthropology, ENG101, junior standing.

ANT399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ANT430 - American Indian History (3 cr.)

Examines major themes, events, and trends in North American Indian history. Focuses on the historical experiences of Native Americans and their struggles to retain their cultures while adapting to the challenges posed by catastrophic population decline, expansion and conquest by colonizing powers, and the "Indian policies" adopted by the United States. Liberal arts. (Every Other Fall). Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102 or ANT102.

ANT431 - First Nations of Canada (3 cr.)

Examines major themes, events, and trends in the history of Aboriginal people in what is now "Canada." Explores the cultures and historical experiences of Indigenous people, including their struggles to retain their culture, land, and sovereignty in the face of catastrophic population decline, expansion and conquest by colonizing powers, and the policies adopted by the provinces and the federal government. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS132 or HIS171 or HIS172 or ANT102 or CAS111.

ANT451 - Topics in Anthropology (1 to 3 cr.)

Topics of current interest in Anthropology for discussion and research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ANT101 or ANT102.

ANT452 - Approaches to Anthropological Research (3 cr.)

Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 9 credit hours in ANT

ANT453 - Topics in Archaeology (1 to 3 cr.)

Topics of current interest in Archaeology for discussion and research. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: vary with topic.

ANT480 - Advanced Research Seminar (3 cr.)

Capstone advanced research project in anthropology, focused particular subdisciplinary interests of student. Special mentoring with faculty who share that interest. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ANT380 and senior standing or POI.

ANT489 - Washington Internship Institute (3 to 15 cr.)

May be repeated for a total of 15 credits.

ANT496 - Teaching Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Assist instructor in planning, preparation, class discussion, tutoring, and/or group projects. Each student and instruction will complete a contract specifying the student's duties. Can be repeated for different courses. Prerequisites: ANT101 or ANT102 and POI.

ANT499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

(Spring, Fall)

ANT599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ARA111 - Elementary Arabic I (3 cr.)

Beginning study of modern Arabic with emphasis on alphabet, speaking, listening, reading, writing, and the cultures of the Middle East and Arabic-speaking world. Additionally, the course will enhance basic communication skills. Open to students without previous knowledge of Arabic. (Fall & Spring). Liberal arts.

ARA112 - Elementary Arabic II (3 cr.)

Continuation of ARA111. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ARA111 or POI.

ART102 - Introductory Art Symposium: New Majors (1 cr.)

The purpose of the course is to orient the new art major to the art program and the field of art. Students will be introduced to the art program through a series of art faculty presentations in their respective areas. Additional class activities will include films, demonstrations and discussion about facilities, career, graduate studies, etc. Pass/fail. Attendance at Visual Artist Series and museum exhibitions is required. (Restricted to new art majors). (Fall). Liberal arts.

ART104 - Basic Design: 2-D (3 cr.)

An introduction to two-dimensional design that emphasizes visual thinking through the development of a vocabulary of the elements and principles of design, a conceptual approach to applying them creatively, and a respect for craftsmanship in their applications. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

ART137 - Western Art: Ancient and Medieval (3 cr.)

Survey of important developments in western art during Antiquity and the Middle Ages. First half of a two-semester sequence. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ART139 - Western Art: Renaissance to Modern (3 cr.)

Survey of the history of the art of Western civilization, from the Renaissance to the Modern era. Second half of two-semester sequence. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ART161 - Introduction to Drawing (3 cr.)

Teaches drawing concepts and skills through beginning-level drawing problems in line, shape, plane, form, space, tone, gesture, pictorial organization and content. Develops personal expression and aesthetic, visual, tactile and kinesthetic sensitivity. Form and content in works by great masters, past and present, are examined. Analytical and intuitive thinking with various materials and subjects are required. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ART199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ART205 - Introduction to Graphic Design (3 cr.)

An introduction to the profession of graphic design. The course content will integrate computer technology with the formal elements of typography design and basic design principles related to graphic design theory. There will be a history of graphic design presented in lecture format, as a complement to "hands-on" studio work. (Every Year). Liberal arts.

ART208 - Computer Art (3 cr.)

An introduction to the use of the computer in visual art practice focusing on the basics of Photoshop as a tool for adjusting, composing, and manipulating images. Topics include ethics of appropriation, serial imagery, the importance of archival materials in professional presentation and the preparation of a digital portfolio. (Every Two Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ART104, ART262.

ART211 - Introduction to Photography (3 cr.)

Examines silver-based B&W photography as a self-expressive medium and art form. Introduces the student to the aesthetics of photography while mastering its basic skills. Develops an understanding of the medium through assignments and critiques, prefaced by historical and contemporary examples. Student must provide a suitable camera (see Art Department). Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

ART221 - Introduction to Painting (3 cr.)

Teaches painting concepts and skills through beginning-level oil painting problems in color, form, space, paint surface, pictorial organization and content. Develops personal expression and aesthetic, visual, tactile and kinesthetic sensitivity. Form and content in works by great masters, past and present, are examined. Analytical and intuitive thinking in various painting situations and methods are required. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ART231 - 3-D Design (3 cr.)

Introduction to formal, organizational, and expressive concerns related to the development of three-dimensional art forms. Subject matter, form, and content will be explored with relationship to the three-dimensional object and its unique spatial properties. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ART232 - Sculpture I (3 cr.)

Materials, methods and ideas related to the development of sculptural concepts. Students will learn skills in bronze casting, welding, metal fabrication, assemblage and mixed materials. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART231.

ART255 - Introduction to Ceramics (3 cr.)

A beginning studio course in ceramics. Introduction to the properties of clay, hand building techniques, the potter's wheel, methods of decoration and glazing, ceramic history and creative problem solving. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

ART262 - Drawing II (3 cr.)

The course deepens comprehension of materials, concepts, pictorial organization, and expression. An investigation of a variety of drawing experiences, subject matter, and drawing media broadens the definition of drawing. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART161.

ART270 - American Art: Colonial Period to the Present (3 cr.)

A survey of architecture, sculpture, and painting in the United States from the colonial period to the present. Major movements and artists are considered, from the Federal era and the Gothic Revival to Impressionism and Post-Modernism. Topics include the changing role of the visual arts in American society and the impact of historical events on American art and culture. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ART274 - Women in Art (3 cr.)

A chronological overview of western art, with an emphasis on painting, sculpture and architecture, made by and for women, from Antiquity to the present. Particular emphasis on the reflection in art of issues and concerns specific to women. Introduction to traditional and feminist art historical method. (Every Two Years). Liberal arts.

ART280 - Introduction to Printmaking (3 cr.)

Students will be introduced to intaglio and relief printmaking processes including linocut, drypoint and etching. Printmaking media will be used to develop individualized artistic statements and problem-solving skills. Students will learn how to edition prints, making copies for exchange and critique. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ART299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ART305 - Graphic Design II (3 cr.)

An intermediate-level course exploring the incorporation of typography design and advanced page design organization necessary for graphic design. Included within the hands-on studio experience is a continuation of a lecture series on graphic design history. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART205 or POI.

ART306 - Digital Imaging (3 cr.)

Visual problems and exercises as an introduction to the fundamental tools and techniques of photographic image manipulation and related computer software programs. Adobe Photoshop is the primary software, but other applications may be introduced. The course includes image scanning, photo retouching, color correction, image compositing/layering and preparing of images for the web. Emphasis is placed on individual interpretation and personal expression. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART305 or POI.

ART307 - Illustration (3 cr.)

Explores the use of various media and techniques for a wide range of illustration projects. The emphasis is on a synthesis of technical proficiency and aesthetic sensitivity in solving specific visual communication challenges using a pictorial, narrative language. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART306 or POI.

ART312 - Photography II (3 cr.)

Provides an in-depth investigation of photography as an art form and examines aesthetic considerations in image making. Students are given the opportunity to select some themes and topics. Introduces additional photographic history, techniques, and fundamental tools for photographers. Students will create a portfolio of images in response to assigned and self-directed projects. All images are produced in the B&W darkroom. Student must provide a suitable camera (see Art Department). Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART211 or POI.

ART315 - Photography III: Digital Photo (3 cr.)

Examines tools and techniques of photographic image manipulation using Adobe Photoshop on Macintosh computers. Film scanning, digital image downloading, photo retouching, color management, and composition/layering of images are addressed through specific assignments. Students will create a portfolio of images in response to assignments and self-directed projects. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART312 or POI.

ART319 - Photography IV (3 cr.)

Examines problems in B&W silver and digital color and B&W photography. Integrates studio lighting techniques and exploration of alternative photographic processes. Students may work in the digital or silver darkroom at their discretion. Emphasis on self-directed semester long project to be presented as part of final portfolio accompanied by strong artist statement. In-depth research on historic and contemporary photographers occurs throughout the semester. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART315 or POI.

ART322 - Painting II (3 cr.)

Painting II deepens the comprehension of concepts, color theory, and methods of painting. The student's knowledge and studio experiences are broadened through an investigation of a variety of subject matter and processes specific to oil painting. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART221.

ART325 - Introduction to Art Therapy (3 cr.)

An introduction to and experiential overview of the field of art therapy, an interdisciplinary field combining principles and practices and practices in art, psychology, and sociology. (Fall -Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101; ART104 or ART161 or ART231; or POI.

ART332 - Sculpture II (3 cr.)

An in-depth studio experience intended to further develop technical and aesthetic considerations related to selected sculptural mediums. An emphasis will be placed on stronger self-expression in the student's creative efforts. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART232.

ART342 - Greek and Roman Art (3 cr.)

Mediterranean art and architecture c.2500 BC-AD 500, including Cycladic, Minoan, and Mycenaean; Greek (Geometric through Hellenistic); Etruscan; Roman Republican; and roman Imperial through Late Antiquity. Emphasis on evolution of the human image, especially in sculpture, and on mythological and historical narrative. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART137 or POI.

ART343 - Medieval Art (3 cr.)

European art and architecture c. 300-1400. Primary focus on fresco, manuscript illumination, sculpture, and architecture of the medieval West. Visual arts of Byzantium also discussed. Emphasis on patronage, art/historical context, and function of imagery. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART137 or POI.

ART344 - Italian Renaissance Art (3 cr.)

Painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy between 1250 and 1600. Analysis of style and content within the art/historical context of the period. Emphasis on role of personal, civic, and courtly patronage. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART137 or POI.

ART345 - Baroque & Rococo Art (3 cr.)

Painting, sculpture, and architecture of Western Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries against the background of cultural changes resulting from such developments as geographical discoveries, the Counter-Reformation, art patronage by the middle class, and urban planning. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART139 or equivalent.

ART346 - 19th Century European Art: Neo-Classicism to Impressionism (3 cr.)

An investigation of the major artists and movements of the century of great social upheaval from 1780 to 1880. Issues include the impact of industrialization and social revolution on the arts and the beginnings of a distinctly modern aesthetic in painting, sculpture and architecture. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART139 or equivalent.

ART347 - Modern Art: Post-Impressionism to Surrealism (3 cr.)

An analysis of the foundations of modern painting, sculpture and architecture as established and developed in the period from 1880 to 1940. Topics include the emergence of abstract art and the changing role of art in an increasingly technological society. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART139 or equivalent.

ART349 - Northern Renaissance Art (3 cr.)

Painting, graphic arts, and sculpture of northern Europe, especially the Netherlands and Germany, c. 1400-1600. Analysis of style and content within the art/historical context of the period. Emphasis on the evolution of the northern tradition as reflected in the works of a select group of artists. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART137 or POI.

ART354 - Jewish Art to 1600 (3 cr.)

Jewish art and architecture from its origins in ancient Palestine through c. 1600 in Europe. Analysis of style and content within the Judaic context as well as consideration of interaction with and function within contemporary Middle Eastern and European cultures. (Every Other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART137 or POI.

ART356 - Ceramics II (3 cr.)

An intermediate course in ceramics to familiarize the student with advanced techniques and principles of the clay medium. Development of personal expression and conceptual realization will be explored through a series of assigned projects. There is technical emphasis on wheel throwing, hand-building, and surface techniques. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART255.

ART363 - Drawing III (3 cr.)

The course introduces a variety of drawing concepts, subject matter, and media. The translation of the still life, figure, and landscape is explored to pursue an understanding of formal and conceptual content. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART262.

ART380 - Printmaking II (3 cr.)

Students will expand their understanding and practice of printmaking through lithography, relief intaglio and/or monotype processes. Emphasis will be placed on individualized artistic statements and the exploration of print history and contemporary art critical concerns. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART280 or ART281.

ART397 - Junior Level Portfolio Review (0 cr.)

The review will be a public presentation of portfolios in January or February of the spring semester, and a written artist's statement. Work presented will be from the foundation program, plus all other art areas which the student has studied. Transfer students will be included, and will include work from their previous institution. Majors who fail to participate in the review will not be permitted to register for art courses in the subsequent semester. Contact the art department for further details. Pass/fail. (Spring).

ART399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ART405 - Publication Design (3 cr.)

A continuation of the typographic studies featured in Graphic Design II, with an emphasis on designing for books, magazines and catalogs. The integration of type and image in the layout program InDesign is the focus of this class which prepares students to create graphic design projects for print publications. (Every Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ART305 and ART306 or POI.

ART406 - Package & Branding Design (3 cr.)

An exploration of branding and corporate identity as well as package design. A series of case study projects will provide opportunities for creative practical and appropriate solutions to branding, advertising, and packaging in a variety of three dimensional products. This course encourages the use of brainstorming in teams and engaging in creative problem solving and discourse on the relationship of design to the marketplace. Liberal arts. (Every Year). Prerequisites: ART305 or POI.

ART407 - Introduction to Design for the Web and Interactive Media (3 cr.)

An introduction to the development and implementation of media for the web. Special focus is placed on producing interactive content using Dreamweaver as a base from which to explore HTML, CSS, and various scripting languages to create aesthetically pleasing web experiences founded in basic design principles. The course aims to familiarize the student with the standards required in the field of web design, including code and image standards, and various avenues to implement these standards. An emphasis is placed on creative thinking, problem solving, and personal expression. The aim of this course is to be a primary and introductory source of information for designing for the web. Image manipulation, formatting, and compression will be covered along with using Dreamweaver as both a visual and raw code editing tool. (Every Two Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART305, ART 306 or POI.

ART408 - Portfolio Development (3 cr.)

An advanced, in-depth continuation for students who have completed several courses in the area of study, and are in their final year preparing to pursue graduate school or join the graphic design field. The course will concentrate on refining a body of work, creating new design work in the student's area of interest, creating a personal identity and creating a digital portfolio. Liberal arts. (Every Year). Prerequisite: ART406 or POI.

ART409 - Advanced Design for the Web and Interactive Media (3 cr.)

This course offers an advanced look at the role of the graphic designer in the development and the implementation of interactive media. An emphasis is placed on expanding on the student's base knowledge of HTML, CSS, scripting languages, Flash, and ActionScript, to create content for the web and hand-held devices. The use of sound and video will also be explored to create engaging and immersive interactive experiences. An emphasis is placed on aesthetics, problem solving, and personal expression. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ART407 or POI.

ART411 - Photography V (3 cr.)

Examination of advanced photographic possibilities. B&W, color, view camera, and alternative process are available options. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART319 or POI.

ART418 - Photography VI: Special Problems in Photography (3 cr.)

Increased emphasis on individual directions and approaches to photographic image making. B&W, color, view camera and digital photography are available options. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART411 or POI.

ART419 - Photography VII: Portfolio Development (3 cr.)

Portfolio building through refinement of individual concepts and direction of work. Technical and conceptual maturity addressed through editing of images and preparation of a digital and hard copy body of work. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART418 or POI.

ART423 - Painting III (3 cr.)

The course broadens the student's definition of painting. An emphasis is placed upon learning to select personal subject matter, form, and content. Old Master, modern, and contemporary painting are discussed as they relate to individual units of instruction. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART322.

ART424 - Painting IV (3 cr.)

The course places emphasis on the development of individual concepts and direction of work. Research of developments in modern and contemporary painting is applied and discussed in relation to the direction of the individual student's direction. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART423.

ART425 - Painting V (3 cr.)

The concepts of representation and abstraction in painting are addressed in this course. Specific methods of painting and the use of color for the purpose of personal expression are explored. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART424.

ART426 - BFA Painting VI (3 cr.)

The development of a portfolio of painting for B.F.A. students is created by refining both formal and conceptual concerns. Ongoing independent research of contemporary artists and art critics by the students' aesthetic interests is required. With permission of instructor, ART428 may be taken concurrently with ART426. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART425.

ART428 - BFA Painting VII (3 cr.)

The course places emphasis on the preparation, documentation, and presentation required for exhibiting paintings. The creation of a focused body of work that is unified formally and conceptually is required. This is the final course for B.F.A. students with a concentration in painting. With permission of instructor, ART428 may be taken concurrently with ART426. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART426.

ART433 - Sculpture III (3 cr.)

Development of the student's individual sculptural style and direction based on independent research and the student's goals. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART332.

ART434 - Sculpture IV (3 cr.)

Continuation of ART433. Increased emphasis in the development of individual concepts and direction of work. Technical refinement of chosen medium. Individual and group critique. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART433.

ART435 - Sculpture V (3 cr.)

Continued refinement of style and direction in sculpture to develop stronger philosophical concerns related to the student's personal work. Group and individual critiques. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART434.

ART436 - BFA Sculpture VI (3 cr.)

Continuation of ART435. Intended for BFA students with a concentration in sculpture. Portfolio-building through refinement of individual concepts and direction of work. Technical and philosophical development in context of students' aesthetic motivation. Individual and group critiques. With permission of instructor ART438 may be taken concurrently with ART436. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART435.

ART438 - BFA Sculpture VII (3 cr.)

Continuation of ART436. Intended for BFA students with a concentration in sculpture. Portfolio-building through refinement of individual concepts and direction of work. Technical and philosophical development in context of students' individual work. Ongoing independent research into artist and art critics sympathetic to students' aesthetic motivation. Creation of slide portfolio. Individual and group critiques. With permission of instructor, ART438 may be taken concurrently with ART436. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART436.

ART457 - Ceramics III (3 cr.)

Emphasis on working with advanced concepts in clay form involving directions according to individual student's capacities and interests. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART356.

ART458 - Ceramics IV (3 cr.)

Continuation of ART457. This studio class is designed to support and develop personal creative expression and growth in ceramics. There is a focus on the continuation of technical and aesthetic development. Projects will require investigation of historical and contemporary trends based on an individual level. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART457.

ART459 - Ceramics V (3 cr.)

A continuation of ART458. This studio class is designed to support and develop personal creative expression and growth in ceramics. There is a focus on the continuation of technical and aesthetic development. Projects will require investigation of historical and contemporary trends. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ART458.

ART460 - BFA Ceramics VI (3 cr.)

Continuation of ART459. This course is intended for BFA students with a concentration in ceramics. There is a focus on portfolio building through refinement of individual concepts and direction of work with technical, philosophical, and conceptual development of students' individual work. Students will continue independent research into artists and art critics sympathetic to students' aesthetic motivations. Individual and group critiques. With permission of instructor, ART460 may be taken concurrently with ART461. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART459.

ART461 - BFA Ceramics VII (3 cr.)

Continuation of ART460. This course is intended for BFA students with a concentration in ceramics. There is a focus on portfolio building through refinement of individual concepts and direction of work with technical, philosophical, and conceptual development of students' individual work. Students will continue independent research into artists and art critics sympathetic to students' aesthetic motivations. Individual and group critiques. With permission of instructor, ART461 may be taken concurrently with ART460. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART460.

ART464 - Drawing IV (3 cr.)

The course examines the aesthetic and conceptual issues of representation and abstraction. The comprehension of these concerns will be increased through the exploration and refinement of selected media and drawing situations. The student becomes more self-critical and acquires additional skills and concepts needed for self-expression and personal growth . (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART363.

ART465 - Drawing V (3 cr.)

The course places emphasis on technical and conceptual issues developed from the drawing process. Technical refinements of selected drawing media are examined to integrate aesthetic and expressive concerns. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART464.

ART466 - BFA Drawing VI (3 cr.)

The course is intended for BFA students with a concentration in drawing. Refinement of individual concepts and direction of work is emphasized. Independent research of artists and art critics is required for portfolio development. With permission of instructor, ART467 may be taken concurrently with ART466. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART465.

ART467 - BFA Drawing VII (3 cr.)

The course clarifies the formal and conceptual direction of B.F.A students whose studio concentration is in drawing. Specific aesthetic and conceptual concerns are investigated in a series of works designed to unify the process and content relationships within the drawing portfolio. With permission of instructor, ART467 may be taken concurrently with ART466 or ART468. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART466.

ART468 - BFA Drawing VIII (3 cr.)

Refinement of formal and conceptual concerns is the basis for the conclusion of the drawing portfolio. The creation, selection, and documentation of the portfolio of completed works are required. This is the final course in the drawing sequence for BFA students with a concentration in drawing. With permission of instructor, ART468 may be taken concurrently with ART467. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART467.

ART469 - B.F.A. Senior Exhibition Workshop (1 cr.)

This workshop provides a structured venue in which senior B.F.A. candidates and Museum Studies minor candidates, in collaboration with Art Department faculty and the Plattsburgh State Museum Director, begin to prepare for the annual B.F.A. Senior Exhibition. Topics include faculty review of student work, artist statements, catalogue design, fundraising, and preparation of work for exhibition. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: B.F.A. candidate with senior standing or Museum Studies minor candidate with junior or senior standing.

ART471 - Contemporary Art (3 cr.)

An analysis of major directions in the visual arts since WWII involving extensive writing and advanced readings, research and discussion of selected current issues. (Fall). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: one 300-level art history course, ENG101.

ART472 - Museum Studies/Art Exhibitions (3 cr.)

Readings on museum history, concepts, structure and procedures. A general text and specialized essays of the American Association of Museums will be used. Study of the procedural, curatorial and planning works of museums and exhibitions. Faculty review of portfolios for the Senior Art Major Exhibition. Three field trips will be made, for which transportation will be provided; other expenses are the student's responsibility. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: junior standing.

ART473 - Senior Art Major Exhibition (1 cr.)

An advanced practicum for students interested in the museum experience and the preparation of art exhibits. Principles and techniques learned in ART472 will be used to create an exhibition of student's own work (Senior Art Major Exhibition), or selected material from the permanent art collection or material of another discipline. (Spring). Liberal arts. Pass/fail. Prerequisites: ART469, senior B.F.A. candidate, completion of art foundation program, 37 credits in art, passing art faculty review in ART469 if exhibiting, approval of museum director.

ART474 - Senior Art History Thesis (3 cr.)

Readings and research in a selected area of art history. The major focus will consist of the preparation of a research paper dealing with a specific art-historical topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Senior art history major.

ART475 - Art of the Book (3 cr.)

Advanced study of text illustration, primarily in book form, in western and non-western cultures from c.3500 BC to the present. Emphasis on the relationship between text and image and the evolution of illustration cycles. Involves advanced readings, extensive writing, including several short essays and a research project with multiple stages of preparation and review, and a class presentation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: one 300-level art history course, ENG101.

ART480 - Printmaking III (3 cr.)

Integration of printmaking concerns explored in ART280 and ART380 with an emphasis on in-depth work in a particular process and the continued examination of printmaking media, such as relief, intaglio, lithography, monotype and the book arts. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART380.

ART481 - Printmaking IV (3 cr.)

Advanced experimentation and implementation of a variety of printmaking media will be used to develop students' in-depth conceptual statements. Personal research and semester-long projects will be emphasized. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART480.

ART482 - Printmaking V (3 cr.)

A continuation of ART481 in which masterful use of the print processes will result in an exhibition ready portfolio. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART481.

ART483 - BFA Printmaking VI (3 cr.)

A continuation of ART482. Advanced experimentation with a variety of printmaking media to develop a body of work for exhibition. Refinement of form and technique will serve the students' construction and understanding of mature aesthetic concepts. With the instructor's permission, ART484 may be taken concurrently with ART483. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART482.

ART484 - BFA Printmaking VII (3 cr.)

A continuation of ART483. Advanced experimentation with a variety of printmaking media to develop a body of work for exhibition. Refinement of form and technique will serve the students' construction and understanding of mature aesthetic concepts. With the instructor's permission, ART484 may be taken concurrently with ART483. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ART483.

ART496 - Studio Tutorial Experience (1 to 3 cr.)

Assistance in classroom planning, preparation, demonstrations and tutoring various studio courses. One to three credits may be earned each semester, but no more than three credits may be earned in the same course. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI and chairperson, completion of two courses (with a minimum 3.0 GPA) in the tutorial area.

ART499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ART599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ASI110 - Introduction to Asia (3 cr.)

A survey of East, South, Central and West Asia's past and present society and culture. Incorporates anthropology, history, geography and other disciplines to provide a broad comparative overview. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ASI199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ASI299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ASI399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ASI499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

AST101 - Introduction to Astronomy (4 cr.)

To study the development of astronomy from ancient times to present. The course gives a short historical development of astronomical thought followed by a study of the major topics in modern astronomy; the study includes the appropriate physics and mathematics needed to better understand the advances and development of astronomy. The level of physics and mathematics is commensurate with the background of the students in the course. The course is designed for the non-science major. Lecture/Laboratory. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: high school algebra.

AST101L - Astronomy Lab (0 cr.)

Prerequisites: High School Mathematics

AST102 - Introduction to Astronomy (3 cr.)

Refer to AST102 course description. Lecture only. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: high school algebra.

AST116 - Celestial and Planetary Systems (4 cr.)

Introduction to the scientific method by investigating the conceptual and historical development of multiple celestial and planetary systems. We will make use of a state-of-the-art planetarium system capable of simulating the dynamics of celestial motion, accurately representing observable phenomena as seen in the night sky, and capable of assisting in the comparisons of planetary and stellar evolution, structure, properties, and compositions. The possibilities of future space exploration, extraterrestrial life, and off-world colonization will also be investigated. This course uses curriculum-based introduction ideally suited to assist future elementary school teachers to teach to National and New York State Science Learning Standards. Students will engage in activities and experiences that are transferable to the elementary school classroom. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: high school mathematics.

AST116L - Celestial and Planetary Systems Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall & Spring).

AST199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

AST299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

AST399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

AST499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

AST599 - Independent Study (1 to 12 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits.

BIO100 - Concepts in Biology (4 cr.)

Main concepts in biology with particular reference to human biology. Significance of these concepts to human life and their impact upon society. For non-science majors only. Lecture and laboratory. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO101 or BIO103 for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO101 - General Biology I (4 cr.)

Fundamental principles of biology at the molecular and cellular level are considered beginning with the chemical basis of life and including cell organization, membrane physiology, photosynthesis, respiration and aspects of genetics, immunology and development. Lecture/laboratory. BIO101 and BIO102 may be taken in any order. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100 or BIO103 for credit. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO102 - General Biology II (4 cr.)

An introduction to the study of fundamental processes of living organisms. The structure, function, ecological interrelationships and evolution of organisms are considered. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO105 for credit Lecture/laboratory. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO103 - Concepts in Biology Without Lab (3 cr.)

Main concepts in biology are discussed with particular reference to human biology. Significance of these concepts to human life and their impact on society. An introductory course without labs, designed for non-science majors. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO 100 or BIO 101 for credit. Cannot be used as a prereq for any course in biology. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO106 - Epidemic! (1 cr.)

An introduction to Epidemics. What are epidemics and how are they controlled? Topics include human pathogens, the process of disease, and how diseases are fought. We will introduce the history of epidemics using Spanish Flu and the Irish Potato famine as socially and medically important events. Bioterrorism and new emerging infectious diseases, including AIDs, show that the study of epidemics is not just about the past. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG 101 (may be taken concurrently).

BIO113 - Pharmacology of Illicit Drugs (3 cr.)

Explores the ways that recreational and illicit drugs interact with the human body. A background in cell biology and nerve physiology will be provided, followed by discussions of specific drugs of abuse and their physical and psychological effects. This course is intended for a non-biology audience and cannot be used for elective credit in biology. (Summer/Winter/Every Other Fall). Liberal arts.

BIO114 - Introduction to the Health Professions (1 cr.)

This course is intended to provide a survey of the options available in the field of health care. Each week a different health care practitioner from the area will give a 30-40 minute talk followed by a question-and-answer period. Typical presentations will be by a general practice M.D., an M.D. in a specialty (e.g., OB/GYN), a pharmacist, a physical therapist, a dentist, physician's assistant, a medical technologist/cytotechnologist, a nurse, a nurse practitioner, a veterinarian, an athletic trainer, and a chiropractor. The purpose of the course is to provide students interested in health care an opportunity to explore the different fields available. (Every other spring). Liberal arts.

BIO120 - Human Biology (3 cr.)

An introduction to human anatomy and physiology for the non-science major with emphasis on health. Human genetics, development and aging, disease, and human evolution, and ecology will be covered. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Cannot be taken as credit for the biology and nursing majors.

BIO133 - Introduction to Cell Biology (1 cr.)

This course, intended for a non-biology major audience, explores eukaryotic life at the cellular level. Topics covered include the scientific method, biochemical molecules, and reactions and protein production. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100, BIO101, or BIO103 for credit. Cannot be used as an elective within the biology major or as a prereq for any course in biology. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO134 - Information Flow in Biology (1 cr.)

This course, intended for a non-biology major audience, explores how life uses information and passes it to the next generation. Topics covered include mitotic and meiotic cell division and Mendelian genetics. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100, BIO101, or BIO103 for credit. Cannot be used as an elective within the biology major or as a prerequisite for any course in biology. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO135 - Introduction to Evolution (1 cr.)

This course, intended for a non-biology major audience, explores how life evolved and continues to evolve. It will begin with a discussion of Charles Darwin and then explain changes in biology from a microevolutionary and macroevolutionary perspective. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO100, BIO101, or BIO103 for credit. Cannot be used as an elective within the biology major or as a prerequisite for any course in biology. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO195 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO202 - Introduction to Microbiology (3 cr.)

Fundamental concepts of Microbiology, including cell structure and function, with an emphasis on Bacteriology. Application of microbiology in health-related fields, including food microbiology, health and disease, and survey of major human pathogens. Cannot be taken in addition to BIO203 for credit. Liberal arts.

BIO203 - Microbiology (4 cr.)

The biology of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, prions, viroids, protozoa, and algae (with a focus on bacteria). The course will introduce fundamental aspects of microorganisms, including their structure, growth, metabolism, genetics, and diversity. The course will then build on these fundamentals to discuss applications of microbiology, including health, disease, food production, industry, ecology, and laboratory methods in microbiology. Lecture/laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or CHE271.

BIO205 - Introduction to Botany (3 cr.)

Biology, ecology, and evolution of flowering and non-flowering plants; with an emphasis on differences and similarities in anatomy, morphology and reproductive biology among the major groups within the Plant Kingdom. Late-semester field trips. (Every other spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102 or POI.

BIO208 - Evolution (3 cr.)

Origin and evolution of major groups of organisms, and the genetic and environmental factors involved. Major topics include the origin of life, sources of genetic variation, mechanisms of selection, phylogeny and human evolution. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102

BIO209 - Vertebrate Zoology (3 cr.)

Survey of the vertebrate animals emphasizing their evolution and diversity. All major vertebrate groups are covered and students learn the defining characteristics of the groups and their ecological and evolutionary relationships. Sample groups are used to illustrate and explore major themes in biology. Course is designed for Biology, Environmental Science and Ecology majors. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102 or POI.

BIO295 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO299 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO304 - Ecology (4 cr.)

Study of the interactions between organisms and their environments. Topics include the ecological principles of energy flow, biogeochemistry, global climate change, adaptation by individual organisms to their environment, properties of population, community structure and dynamics, ecosystem productivity and functions and review of ecological literature. Laboratory includes field illustrations of ecological habitats, experiences utilizing methods and techniques to conduct ecological measurements, and ecological data analysis. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102.

BIO305 - General Genetics (4 cr.)

An overview of the major concepts in genetics will be presented. Topics include: Mendelian genetics, gene interactions, linkage and chromosome mapping, mutations, population genetics and evolution, quantitative inheritance, molecular biology and bacterial genetics. Lecture/laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO101, CHE112.

BIO310 - Plant Diversity and Evolution (4 cr.)

An exploration of the diversity of plant life on Earth. All major higher plant groups are covered, but the primary focus is on the families of flowering plants. Students will learn to recognize the characteristics of the major families while learning about their distributions, natural history, evolutionary relationships, and ethnobotanical uses. Late-semester field trips will focus on local representatives of families covered in class. Liberal Arts. (Every other Spring Semester). Prerequisites: POI or junior standing, BIO205 and BIO208.

BIO323 - Invertebrate Zoology (3 cr.)

Survey of the invertebrate animals emphasizing their evolution and diversity. All major invertebrate groups are covered and students learn the defining characteristics of the groups and their ecological and evolutionary relationships. Sample groups and dissections are used to illustrate and explore major themes in biology. Course is designed for Biology, Environmental Science and Ecology majors. (Fall, every two years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102 or POI.

BIO326 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I (4 cr.)

This course examines the structure and function of the human body at the cellular, histological and gross levels. Systems under study in this first semester of a two semester series include: cellular physiology, epithelial and connective tissues, cartilage and bone, muscle and nervous tissues, sensory systems, and the central nervous system. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE271; or CHE111 and BIO101.

BIO327 - Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4 cr.)

This course examines the structure and function of the human body at the cellular, histological and gross levels. Systems under study in this second semester of a two semester series include: autonomic nervous system, endocrine, cardiovascular, blood, lymphoid, immunity, respiratory, digestion, metabolism, urinary, acid base balance, and reproduction. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO326.

BIO328 - Introduction to Histology (3 cr.)

Histology is the study of tissues. The course combines ideas from basic histotechnology and functional histology, and gives students the opportunity to develop several skills related to tissue slide interpretation. In addition to hands-on experience with microscopes, to study the four major mammalian tissue types and how they associate to form organs, students learn about important technical aspects of histology such as tissue processing, embedding, sectioninng and staining. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101.

BIO329 - Animal Behavior (3 cr.)

The behavior of non-human animals in their natural habitat and communities, including the genetics, development and ecology of behavior in an evolutionary context. Lecture. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102.

BIO333 - Biostatistics (3 cr.)

Introduction to statistical analysis of univariate biological data, including: statistics of location and dispersion, analysis of variance (ANOVA), linear regression, correlation, and non-parametric tests. Discussion of experimental design and use of a statistical package for data analysis, followed by interpretation of results. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: a 100-level science course, sophomore standing.

BIO334 - Revolution in Agriculture: Transgenic Plants (3 cr.)

Discussion of plant biology, agriculture and the use of genetically modified plants to provide food, pharmaceuticals and partial independence from pesticide, fertilizer and herbicide use in the 21st century. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Distributive Natural Science requirement; junior standing.

BIO335 - Extinction (3 cr.)

Discussion of the Biodiversity Crisis and the Concept of the Minimum Viable Population in light of both human induced and natural biological and physical causes for extinction. Survey of the process of extinction ranging from recent extinctions of individual species to mass extinction events in the fossil record. Examines the controversies over the importance of these forcing mechanisms on a global scale and as models for human induced disturbance of the biosphere. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: an introductory course in Biology, Environmental Science, or Geology.

BIO336 - Ecophysiology (3 cr.)

An introduction to the fundamental mechanisms of animal adaptation to environmental variables. The problems of size and scale will be investigated as they relate to central issues in comparative physiology. How animals cope with marine and terrestrial environments, including extreme environments will be considered. (Summer/Winter sessions online; once every two to three years Spring or Fall classroom). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO101 and BIO102.

BIO337 - Introduction to Clinical Practices (1 cr.)

A survey of selected subjects in medicine. The course is intended for students considering a career in health fields. There are five three-hour sessions, each focusing on an area of clinical medicine in which the general public has some awareness. Topics include Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pregnancy, Labor and Delivery, Trauma Resuscitation and Infectious Disease. The goal of each session is to expose the student to current medical practices and procedures to help them determine their career goals. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO101, BIO102, or CHE111 (can be taken concurrently).

BIO339 - The Biology of Aging (3 cr.)

Comprehensive review of the current evolutionary and biochemical theories of aging includes general theoretical background of aging and current research on molecular theories and proposed pharmacological interventions in aging. Includes a laboratory component exploring aging in a model. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO305 (CHE371 recommended).

BIO340 - Bioethics (3 cr.)

An introduction to ethics and decision making, especially in relation to issues stemming from developments in modern biology and the impacts of technology. Emphasis is on using case studies to understand and apply ethical theory and principles. Liberal arts. (Fall or Spring). Prerequisites: BIO305 or POI.

BIO341 - DNA and Bioinformatics (3 cr.)

Bioinformatics merges the fields of biology, informational technology and computer sciences into a single discipline. The students will conduct DNA and protein experiments, then use computers for the retrieval, storage, and analysis of their results and biological information that has been stored in large databanks. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO305 and CHE112.

BIO345 - Field Botany (3 cr.)

Outdoor field complement to lecture-and lab-based botany coursework offered in Biological Sciences. Weekly excursions to local natural areas include on-site lessons on the identification and taxonomy of the North Country flora. Key concepts covered include plant/animal coadaptations, plant community dynamics, and the interactions between native and exotic species. (Every other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI or Junior standing, BIO205.

BIO370 - Biodiversity of Australia (3 cr.)

A student-driven exploration of Australia's most notable organisms. Each student will learn about general concepts on the origins, biogeography, and ecology of the Australian flora and fauna through reading/writing assignments and a term paper constituting a review of the current literature on a species/group. (every other summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO102 and BIO/ENV304 or POI.

BIO380 - Communicating Biology (3 cr.)

The techniques of communicating biology through written, oral, and graphical methods. Emphasis is placed on students developing strong critical thinking, writing, and oral communication skills. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: BIO101, BIO102, ENG101, junior standing.

BIO385 - Topics in Biology I (1 or 2 cr.)

Emphasis on topics of current, high interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. The course will meet for three one-hour lecture periods, or the equivalent, weekly for five weeks. May be repeated. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or BIO102.

BIO386 - Topics in Biology II (2 cr.)

Topics of current interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. Three one-hour lectures, or one three-hour laboratory or the equivalent, weekly for ten weeks. May be repeated. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or BIO102.

BIO387 - Topics in Biology III (3 cr.)

Topics of current interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. Three one-hour lectures, or one 3-hour laboratory, or the equivalent, weekly for the full semester. May be repeated. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO101 or BIO102.

BIO395 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO396 - Independent Study (1 to 3 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO399 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

BIO401 - Cell Biology (4 cr.)

Structure and function of the cell. Emphasis is placed on biochemical reactions that control cell function and the integration of cell function into the physiology of multicellular organisms. Topics include cytoskeletal structure, membranes, signal transduction, movement and cellular reproduction. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO101 and BIO305.

BIO406 - Medical Microbiology (3 cr.)

Biology of pathogenic microorganisms, their isolation and identification; computer studies of epidemiological patterns of microbial diseases. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO203, a CHE course.

BIO407 - Immunology (3 cr.)

Principles of host defense mechanisms, both innate and acquired. Cell development and cooperation in immune reactions. Immunogenetics. Antigen-Antibody interactions and clinical applications. Immune dysfunctions of Hypersentitivies (allergies and autoimmunities) and Immunodeficiencies (primary and secondary). The role of the immune system in AIDS, transplants, cancer and immune responses to infectious disease. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO203, BIO305, CHE242; (BIO401 and CHE371 or CHE401 recommended).

BIO411 - Plant Physiology (4 cr.)

The structure of the plant cell, plant biochemistry and metabolism, and plant growth and development. Lecture/laboratory. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: CHE371 or CHE401; PHY103 or PHY111; MAT131 or MAT161 or BIO333.

BIO417 - Biology of Cancer (3 cr.)

Cancer is a disease of cell division control. This course provides an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control the cellular decision to divide and the DNA mutations that lead to a loss of this control (i.e., cancer). An emphasis is placed on signal transduction mechanisms of mitogens, cell cycle machinery (pRb, E2F, cyclins and CDKs), cell cycle inhibitors, and mechanisms promoting and inhibiting apoptosis. These topics are placed in the context of their exploitation by cancer cells. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO401.

BIO421 - Principles of Animal Physiology (4 cr.)

Control of the internal environment of invertebrate and vertebrate animals by the nervous, endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory and other organ systems. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO102; CHE112; PHY101 or PHY111.

BIO424 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology (3 cr.)

An introduction to the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, including pharmacological treatments of disease processes. The class includes lectures, group workshops, and journal article discussions. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO401 or BIO421.

BIO481 - Conservation Biology (3 cr.)

Application of ecological theory to managing Earth's living resources, with explicit reference to social, political, and ethical considerations. Biodiversity, metapopulations, and restoration biology are explored through lectures, journal readings, and case studies that develop professional skills and judgment. One required weekend field trip. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304.

BIO490 - Cellular Biochemistry Research Experience (15 cr.)

A full-semester research course covering aspects of cellular and molecular biology. The focus of the course will highlight the research interests of the participating faculty. Skills, techniques and instrumentation required for the semester's research are introduced and covered. Success in research requires the ability to ask the right questions and recognize important information obtained through experimentation. This program embraces the essence of scientific method and fosters acquisition and application of knowledge to problem-solving, formation and testing of hypotheses and collection and analysis of results through observation and experimentation. Course instruction includes participation of visiting scientists. Open to all science students regardless of major. (Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: BIO305, CHE112, ENG101, junior standing.

BIO495 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO496 - Laboratory Teaching Experience (1 to 3 cr.)

Planning, preparation, class demonstration and teaching in various biology laboratory sections. May not be repeated. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior standing, permission of the instructor and chairperson, a minimum 2.5 GPA.

BIO499 - Independent Study (0 to 12 cr.)

Undergraduate project individually arranged by student and faculty member. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

BIO510 - Plant Diversity and Evolution (4 cr.)

An exploration of the diversity of plant life on earth. All major higher plant groups are covered, but the primary focus is on the families of flowering plants. Students will learn to recognize the characteristics of the major families while learning about their distributions, natural history, evolutionary relationships, and ethnobotanical uses. Late-semester field trips will focus on local representatives of families covered in class. Students who have received credit for BIO310 may not receive credit for BIO510. (Every other spring semester). Liberal arts.

BIO525 - Cardiovascular Pharmacology (3 cr.)

A study of pharmacological treatments of cardiovascular disease processes, based on the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system. This will include classical pharmacology (dose/response relationships, radioligand binding studies), receptor pharmacology, hemodynamics (cardiac output, vascular resistance, etc.) and major disease processes (e.g., hypertension, arteriosclerosis, and congestive heart failure). The class includes lectures, group workshops, and journal article discussions. Students who have received credit for BIO424 may not receive credit for BIO525. (Every other Fall). Prerequisite: BIO401 or BIO421.

BIO545 - Graduate Field Botany (3 cr.)

Outdoor field experience in botanical science to complement lab-and-lecture-based graduate-level coursework in organismal biology. Weekly excursions to local natural areas include on-site lessons on the identification and taxonomy of the North Country flora. Key concepts covered include plant/animal coadaptations, plant community dynamics, and the interactions between native and exotic species. Students who have received credit for BIO345 may not receive credit for BIO545. (Every other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: graduate standing or POI.

BIO581 - Conservation Biology (3 cr.)

Application of ecological theory to managing earth's living resources, with explicit reference to social, political, and ethical considerations. Biodiversity, metapopulations, and restoration biology are explored through lectures, journal readings, and case studies that develop professional skills and judgement. Graduate enrollees will co-host visiting conservation scientists, act as leaders in group discussions, and attend weekly group discussions in addition to class meetings. Students who have received credit for BIO481 may not receive credit for BIO581. (every other fall/spring). Prerequisites: graduate standing or POI.

BIO587 - Topics in Biology III (3 cr.)

Topics of current interest in biology which are not covered extensively in other biology courses. Three lecture (1 hour periods, or one laboratory (3 hours) period or the equivalent thereof weekly for the full semester. Students who register for BIO587 will be required to complete additional course work beyond the requirements of BIO387. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite(s): BIO101, BIO102.

BIO595 - Graduate Research (2 to 7 cr.)

Graduate research program leading toward a dissertation.

BIO599 - Graduate Independent Study (1 to 7 cr.)

Non-research project or study individually arranged between student and sponsoring faculty member. (Note: BIO599 not for dissertation.)

BUS203 - Business Ethics and Modern Society (3 cr.)

Introduces the first-year student to the topic of ethics, from a broad-based global and theoretical basis, and from the perspectives of our School of Business and Economics nine major disciplines and of business professionals from the surrounding Plattsburgh community. This course introduces the first-year student to the importance of oral communication in business and modern society, and prepares students for their first-year, from scheduling, registration and advising, to planning for academic success. (Fall & Spring).

BUS260 - Business and Society (3 cr.)

Emphasizes informed decision-making in a changing world. A balanced investigation of the challenges faced by business people in pursuit of profit as well as the critical roles of business in the global economy and society. Emphasis on social responsibility, business ethics, equal employment opportunity, intercultural and interpersonal sensitivity, environmental protection and consumerism. Focuses on current issues related to the functioning of business firms in an increasingly interdependent world. (Fall). Liberal arts.

BUS333 - Canadian and U.S. Business: A Comparative View (3 cr.)

The culture and practice of conducting business in Canada and comparison with U.S. culture and practice. Areas of exploration include management style, ethics and social responsibility, marketing and advertising practices, finance, government regulation, tax regulation and forms of business organization. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO101 or ECO110 or ECO111; ACC201; MGM280; MKE290.

BUS388 - Seminar in Professionalism (3 cr.)

This course provides a context for business students to excel in their post-graduate careers by exploring five main areas: 1) Ethics in Business; 2) Managerial and Leadership Skills; 3) Information Technology; 4) Communications (written and oral); 4) Internships; and 5) Career Assessment. Students will develop competence and understanding in each of these areas with an emphasis on research writing and presentations, both individually and as part of a team. By exploring the concept of "professionalism," students will gain insight and appreciation for the characteristics that constitute an effective business leader. This course provides students the opportunity to construct the framework for a career assessment plan where they define professional goals and identify their strengths and weaknesses through written and oral work. Liberal Arts. Approved AWR. (Fall, Spring, Summer). Prerequisites: SBE major, ENG101, junior or senior standing.

BUS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall/Spring).

BUS444 - Selected Topics: Business (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse business topics; topics vary with each offering and may include organizational leadership, current business practices, cross-cultural networks, business trade authors, or critical business approaches. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (Fall). Prerequisites: junior standing and MGM280 or POI.

BUS489 - Business Exit Exam (0 cr.)

Course consists of administration of the Business Exit Exam which serves as an assurance of learning standards by students in the SBE. A passing grade on the exam is a graduation requirement for SBE students majoring in Accounting, Business, Business Administration, Entrepreneurship, Finance, Global Supply Chain Management, International Business, Management, Management Information Systems, and/or Marketing. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing and ACC202, ACC351, ECO260, FIN355, MGM275, MGM280, and MKE290.

BUS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall/Spring).

CAS111 - Introduction to Canada (3 cr.)

A multidisciplinary introduction to the Canadian experience from the perspective of the social sciences and humanities. Sections deal with history, geography, politics, culture, economy, etc. of Canada. Relations with the U.S. are discussed. Distinguished guest lecturers participate. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

CAS305 - Quebec Cinema (3 cr.)

Students will watch and analyze one Quebec-made film per week. Besides analyzing each film for film language, structure and texture, students will be looking for elements of Quebec culture. Students will also gain a basic understanding of the filmmaking process. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS171 or HIS173.

CAS358 - Canadian Cinema (3 cr.)

Students will watch and analyze one Canadian film per week. Besides analyzing each film for film language, structure and texture, students will be looking for general and specific differences between a Canadian film and the typical "Hollywood formula" film of the same genre. Students will also gain a basic understanding of the filmmaking process. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS171 or HIS172 or HIS173.

CAS359 - Profiles of Quebec. (3 cr.)

Profiles of Quebec provides a multi-disciplinary introduction to Quebec from the perspectives of the social sciences and the humanities. The course examines Quebec's geography, history, economics, politics, culture, literature, and arts, as well as Quebec's quest for recognition as a distinct actor in the international political system. A field trip is included. (Every second or third semester). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: CAS111, ENG101, or POI.

CAS375 - Borderland and Migration History: Canada and the United States (3 cr.)

A study of the migration streams between Canada and the United States from the colonial period to the present. Canada-U.S. migrations are examined in a global context, addressing social, political, economic, and cultural issues. (Every other year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172.

CAS379 - Quebec in the United States: Franco-American History and Culture (3 cr.)

This course examines the history and culture of French-Canadian descendants in the United States. It will explore issues of gender and class, the social significance of language, the effects of assimilation, and the challenges faced by contemporary Franco-Americans. (Every other Fall). Liberal Arts. Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172.

CAS412 - Topics in Canadian Studies (1 to 3 cr.)

Topics of current interest which are not covered in other CAS courses. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CAS111, ENG101, or POI.

CAS498 - Internships in Canadian Studies (1 to 6 cr.)

Internships in Canada and the United States in such placements as Canadian Embassies and Consulates, multinational corporations, U.S. Consulates, the New York State Office of Economic Development, and at the Center for the Study of Canada. Experiences focus on business, politics, and communications, though all backgrounds can be considered. A total of 6 credits can be earned. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

CAS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CDS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CDS211 - Elementary American Sign Language I (3 cr.)

American Sign Language vocabulary and finger spelling. Brief overview of deafness, Deaf culture and the origins of American Sign Language. Receptive and expressive fluency in ASL and finger spelling. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CDS212 - Elementary American Sign Language II (3 cr.)

American Sign Language vocabulary, fingerspelling and syntax. Intermediate overview of Deaf culture. Receptive and expressive fluency in ASL. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CDS211.

CDS213 - American Sign Language III (Spring) (3 cr.)

Structural grammar and phrases of American Sign Language (ASL) including but not limited to facial expressions, mouth morphemes, head tilts, shoulder shrugs, and other non-manual markers. Expanded ASL vocabulary and fingerspelling, the origins of ASL, Deaf culture, and receptive and expressive fluency in ASL. (Spring). Prerequisites: CDS211, CDS212.

CDS240 - Introduction to Communication Disorders (3 cr.)

This course offers an introduction to the normal processes of speech, language, hearing, and deglutition; presents an overview of disorders of communication and swallowing; covers issues concerning the preparation to enter the fields of speech-language pathology and audiology; and sensitizes the students to multicultural communication. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

CDS241 - Speech and Language Development (3 cr.)

This course covers communication development in children from birth to pre-school age. Students will be given information on relevant theoretical influences from both language and psychology domains. Also provided will be information regarding specific acquisition sequences, the impact of social and cultural influences on communication development, and how physical and cognitive developments are integrated in the process of speech/language acquisition. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

CDS338 - Professional Writing (3 cr.)

This course provides a medium for students to begin to develop accurate specialized professional writing appropriate to the field of speech-language pathology. It engages the student in a process of self-evaluation to hone her/his writing skills in multiple formal formats, through writing practice, editing, and proofreading. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: junior standing, CDS major, ENG101.

CDS342 - Introduction to Phonetics (3 cr.)

This course will include the study of the science of speech sounds as elements of language and their acoustic, articulatory and physiologic characteristics; transcription practice of both normal and impaired speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet; analysis of articulatory errors. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CDS241 (may be taken concurrently)

CDS343 - Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism (3 cr.)

The course presents a detailed study of the anatomical structures that are responsible for speech and hearing with an emphasis on physiology. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CDS344 - Introduction to Hearing and Speech Science (3 cr.)

Fundamental concepts of acoustics are integrated with the known mechanisms of speech production and auditory processing to develop the basic science foundations of human communication. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CDS343.

CDS345 - Introduction to Audiology (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to the profession of audiology by providing an overview of theories and techniques in assessment and management of the hearing impaired. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CDS343, CDS344 (both may be taken concurrently)

CDS380 - The Practice of Speech-Language Pathology (3 cr.)

Students will learn about employment settings for speech-language pathologists. Applying to graduate school, credential requirements and the ASHA Code of Ethics will be covered. Students will observe community SLP's in the workplace. Orientation to clinical practice, including screening, assessment, selection of therapy materials and clinical paperwork, will be presented. (Fall). Prerequisite: CDS338.

CDS396 - Teaching the Speech-Hearing-Language Handicapped K-12 (Fall - Spring) (9 cr.)

Course prepares the student to become a NY State certified teacher of speech, hearing, language handicapped k-12. The history of special education (twentieth century to present); development of skill in assessment of students (preschool to age 21); knowledge of federal, state laws, regulations governing special education identification and provision of service; development and implementation of appropriate Individual Education Plans; familiarity with New York State and American Speech, Language, Hearing Association codes of ethics and scopes of practice, teaching techniques, models of service delivery in schools are discussed.

CDS410 - Communication Systems and Disorders (3 cr.)

Review of physical systems and theoretical models in normal speech, voice and language, and etiological processes and characteristics of select communication disorders beyond the introductory level. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CDS445 or CDS448.

CDS439 - Participatory Observation (1 cr.)

Students observe 25 hours of therapy and evaluation sessions in speech-language pathology and audiology, identify session components and clinician characteristics that influence the therapeutic interaction, and judge what is effective and efficient. The objective is to help the students decide if this is an appropriate career path. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CDS380 (may be taken concurrently)

CDS443 - Aural Rehabilitation (3 cr.)

This course presents rehabilitative and habilitative techniques for the adult and pediatric hearing impaired population. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CDS345.

CDS445 - Introduction to Articulation and Phonology (3 cr.)

This course will provide information regarding the etiology, diagnosis and therapeutic management of functional and organically-based articulatory and phonological impairments. Normal and impaired development of the articulatory and phonological systems will be described. Specific assessment, diagnostic and intervention procedures will be explained. A general introduction to speech impairments exhibited by individuals with cerebral palsy and cleft palate will be presented. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CDS342 and junior standing.

CDS448 - Language and Literacy Disorders in Children (3 cr.)

This course will provide the student with information regarding oral and written language impairments exhibited by children diagnosed with specific language impairment, language learning disability, or other handicapping conditions such as autistic disorder. Students will be presented with information regarding etiologies of language impairments, description of language impairments, assessment principles and techniques, and intervention procedures appropriate to different age levels and language characteristics. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CDS241 and junior standing.

CDS460 - Clinical Speech Practicum for Beginning Undergraduate Clinicians (0 to 1 cr.)

Beginning, supervised practice in the Speech and Hearing Center with children or adults displaying communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing. Intense supervision will be provided. May be taken up to two times for a total of two credits. (Fall & Spring). Prerequisites: CDS439, senior standing, POI.

CDS461 - Clinical Audiology Practicum -- Beginning Undergraduate Clinicians (0 to 1 cr.)

Beginning, supervised practice in the Speech and Hearing Center with persons displaying communication problems in the area of hearing. Intense supervision will be provided. Can be repeated for a total of 2 credits. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CDS439, senior standing, POI.

CDS465 - Senior Capstone (2 cr.)

Students (a) develop a clinical topic of interest in the field of speech-language pathology or audiology; (b) research relevant variables of communication disorder, such as its nature, etiology, assessment, differential diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment; and (c) produce a written final product to be presented to the faculty. Emphasis is placed on researching, analyzing, and presenting the current professional literature on the topic of interest. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: senior standing.

CDS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CDS524 - Research Design in Communication Disorders and Sciences (2 cr.)

Designed for the Speech-Language Pathology major who requires an understanding of research and design methods in the field of Communication Disorders and Sciences. Includes experimental and statistical control in the design of research; the application of research principles in clinical practice; and evidence-based practice. (Fall).

CDS528 - Clinical Methods (1 cr.)

Students receive training in a variety of areas that is required before they can begin their clinical experience. They are guided through various aspects of the therapeutic process that are similar across disorder categories and receive personalized information and feedback on their personal experiences with clients. All of this is put in the context of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Standards, Code of Ethics, and Scope of Practice thus building the connection to the field of speech-language pathology. (Fall).

CDS531 - Language Disorders in Young Children (3 cr.)

Identification and application of studies in normal language acquisition to the study of communication development in infants and the study of preschool language and learning disorders; emphasis on the assessment of, and intervention with, infants and preschoolers and their families. Content includes interdisciplinary views of the child with communication challenges; issues in communication, social-emotional and cognitive development; related language impairments of various etiologies; challenges in learning and in the classroom for children with language impairments; use of assistive technology; and working as a team member with caregivers, school personnel and other professionals in assessment and intervention. (Spring). Prerequisites: graduate level standing; the equivalent of a college-level course in child language development

CDS532 - Language and Literacy Disorders in School-Age Children and Adolescents (3 cr.)

Characteristics, assessment and intervention of oral and written language disorders in school-age children including: risk factors, impact of commonly co-occurring cognitive characteristics (e.g., executive dysfunction), manifestations of language disorders in various language systems and forms (syntax, semantics, phonology, morphology, pragmatics, narrative language, metalinguistics), multicultural issues, assessment, public and professional policies, assistive technology, and evidence-based practices. (Fall). Prerequisite: graduate standing; college-level course in normal language development.

CDS533 - Neuroanatomy and Physiology of Communication (3 cr.)

General human neuroanatomy and physiology with emphasis on the neuropathologies of communication. (Fall).

CDS534 - Motor Speech Disorders (2 cr.)

Topics include the nature, etiology, assessment, differential diagnosis, and treatment of motor speech disorders in children and adults. There is an emphasis on perceptual assessment, neuroanatomical bases of motor control, evidence based practices, and principles of motor learning used in the clinical treatment of motor speech disorders. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CDS533, CDS535.

CDS535 - Aphasia (3 cr.)

The nature, etiology, assessment, differential diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of aphasia in the adult are presented against a background of models of cortical and subcortical neuropathologies underlying specific deficits of speech, language and communication processes. Children, adolescents and adults will be addressed. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CDS533.

CDS536 - Dysphagia (3 cr.)

This course will provide students with information regarding normal and disordered swallowing/glutition. Anatomy and physiology of swallowing, and the processes of evaluating, diagnosing and treating oropharyngeal dysphagia across the life span will be covered. Students will demonstrate skills in these areas of management. Various technological methods for assessment will be presented. Interdisciplinary concerns and the impacts of ethical and cognitive issues will be discussed. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: CDS533.

CDS537 - Alternative and Augmentative Communication Systems (3 cr.)

Application of current literature on alternative/augmentative communication with a focus on assessment and management of the communication abilities of individuals across the lifespan. Topics include: normal communication development; assessment of cognitive, motor, social and communication skills; etiological factors related to the need for AAC; planning of therapeutic strategies and objectives; training and use of AAC in school, hospital, clinical and home settings; use of assistive technology; assessment of intervention efficacy; and multidisciplinary learning in assessment and intervention. Prerequisite: a college-level course in normal language development. (Summer).

CDS539 - Cognitive Rehabilitation (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the neurological, cognitive, and communicative changes associated with traumatic brain injury, right hemisphere CVA, normal aging, and the dementias. Emphasis will bear on the nature, symptomatology, assessment, and rehabilitation techniques of these cognitive/linguistic disorders. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CDS533.

CDS540 - Evaluation in Speech-Language Pathology (3 cr.)

Topics include: purposes and types of assessment used in speech-language pathology, standardized and non-standardized assessment, ethics in assessment, gathering case history information, interviewing, counseling, multicultural and linguistic diversity issues, sources of test bias, minimizing bias, psychometric concepts in assessment, test administration and scoring, test interpretation, report writing, and oral structure and function examination. (Fall).

CDS542 - Clinical Practicum for Beginning Clinicians (0 to 3 cr.)

Beginning, supervised practice in the Speech and Hearing Center with children or adults displaying communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing to foster the development of basic clinical skills. Intense supervision will be provided. May be repeated five times for a total of six credits. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: matriculated graduate status or department approval for graduate level clinical assignments.

CDS543 - Clinic Practicum for Intermediate (0 to 3 cr.)

Intermediate, supervised practice in the Speech and Hearing Center with children or adults displaying communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing to foster the continued development of clinical skills. Moderate supervision will be provided. May be repeated five times for a total of six credits. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: CDS 542.

CDS544 - Clinical Practicum (0 to 3 cr.)

Advanced, supervised practice in the Speech and Hearing Center with children or adults displaying communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing to foster the development of advanced clinical performance and independent application of knowledge. Minimal supervision will be provided. May be repeated up to five times for a total of six credits. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: CDS543.

CDS545 - Public School Practicum (1 to 6 cr.)

Advanced, supervised practice in a public or private school setting with children who display communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing. Moderate to minimal supervision will be provided. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: CDS543 and POI.

CDS546 - Clinical Practicum - Off Campus I (1 to 6 cr.)

Advanced, supervised practice in off-campus sites with children or adults displaying communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing. Moderate to minimal supervision will be provided. May be repeated up to five times for a total of six credits.(Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: CDS543 and POI.

CDS547 - Evaluation Clinic (0 to 1 cr.)

Advanced, supervised assessment in the Speech and Hearing Center of children or adults displaying communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing. Moderate supervision will be provided. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CDS540 and CDS542.

CDS548 - Audiology Clinic (0 to 1 cr.)

Beginning, supervised practice in the Speech and Hearing Center with persons displaying communication problems in the area of hearing. Intense supervision will be provided. (Fall/Summer/Spring). Prerequisites: matriculated graduate status or meet eligibility requirements for graduate level clinical assignments.

CDS549 - Thesis Research in Communicative Disorders (3 cr.)

Research for master's degree candidates choosing the thesis option.

CDS550 - Social, Emotional, Behavioral, and Cognitive Correlates of Communication Disorders (3 cr.)

Description and exploration of relationships between communication disorders and a variety of social, emotional, behavioral, and cognitive impairments in children and adults; analysis of these deficits with respect to language-learning disabled children, as well as to special populations including autism spectrum disorders, selective mutism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, abused/neglected children; and psychogenic communication disorders. Delineation of assessment and intervention methods, and the roles of the speech/language pathologist in the assessment and management of these disorders as part of a professional team. (Spring).

CDS551 - Clinical Practicum - Off Campus II (1 to 6 cr.)

Advanced, supervised practice in off-campus sites with children or adults displaying communication problems in one or more of the following areas: speech, language, hearing, and swallowing. Moderate to minimal supervision will be provided. May be repeated for a total of six credits. (Fall/Summer). Prerequisites: CDS543 and POI.

CDS561 - Articulation/Phonological Development and Disorders (3 cr.)

Application of current literature on articulation and phonological development and disorders focusing on assessment and management in the clinic and the classroom. Topics include: theories of phonological development; assessment and treatment of articulation and phonological impairments across the lifespan; task analysis in the development of therapeutic objectives; evidence-based practice intervention techniques; measuring and maintaining records of progress; and the relationship between literacy, phonology and phonological awareness. Theoretical and clinical issues will be presented and discussed. (Fall). Prerequisites: graduate-level standing; a course in phonetics.

CDS562 - Voice and Voice Disorders (3 cr.)

Vocal parameters, normal development, anatomy and physiology of the voice are reviewed. A working knowledge of etiology, pathology, and symptomatology for functional, organic, and psychogenic voice disorders is developed. Instrumentation and non-instrumentation procedures for assessment and treatment are learned. Assessment and treatment of vocal cord dysfunction are presented. Students learn how to test and treat clients with hypernasality. Voice prosthetic approaches for alaryngeal patients are covered. (Fall).

CDS563 - Stuttering and Fluency Disorders (3 cr.)

This course addresses the symptomatology, etiology, assessment, and management of fluency disorders from childhood to adulthood. Working with children as members of families and school environments, special considerations for pre-school and school-aged children, and interactions with children, parents and teachers are emphasized. The most current assessment and treatment approaches for preschool, school-aged, and adolescent/adult stutterers will be taught with consideration given to multicultural populations. (Spring).

CDS596 - Teaching Students with Speech-Lang-Disabilities Preschool-12 (3 cr.)

This course will cover the requirements for certification as a NYS Teacher of the Speech-Language-Hearing Disabled, the state and federal laws and regulations governing special education, and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's Code of Ethics and Scope of Practice Statements. The history of special education services will be discussed. Assessment of students from preschool to age 21, the development and implementation of Individual Education Plans, effective teaching techniques, and models of service delivery in the public schools will be presented. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

CDS599 - CDS: Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Designed to allow students to conduct research or to investigate a line of study that is unavailable through regular course selection. Under the direct supervision of a faculty sponsor, faculty advisor, department chairperson, and dean. The study may involve a range of approaches from a literature review to an application of theory.

CEM151 - Personal Resource Management (3 cr.)

Theory and processes of personal resource management. Values clarification, priority setting, realistic goal planning and decision-making are incorporated into management activities. Managing change and planning for the future are emphasized. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA.

CEM199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CEM299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CEM361 - Personal and Family Finance (3 cr.)

Financial activities of the individual and family including the development and management of income, expenditures, safeguarding assets and building a successful financial future. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 2.5 GPA.

CEM399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CEM499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CHE100 - Chemistry and Society with Lab (4 cr.)

A selection of topics used as an introduction to chemical principles. Emphasis on chemical applications to technology and the impact of chemistry on society. Examples of topics: Polymers and Plastics; Metabolism and Biomolecules in Our Diet; Nuclear Chemistry; and Health Risk from Chemicals; etc. Taught as a level for the general student population. Students cannot receive credit for both CHE100 and CHE103 or for CHE100 taken after CHE101, 111, or 112. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

CHE101 - General Chemistry (Fall) (4 cr.)

An introduction to chemistry with emphasis on the important principles and facts necessary for comprehension of the structure of matter, the chemical action of common elements and compounds, and basic chemical calculations. NOTE: students may not take both CHE101 and CHE111 for credit. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CHE103 - Chemistry and Society (3 cr.)

A selection of topics used as an introduction to chemical principles. Emphasis on chemical applications to technology and the impact of chemistry on society. Examples of topics: Polymers and Plastics; Metabolism and Biomolecules in Our Diet; Nuclear Chemistry; and Health Risk from Chemicals; etc. Taught as a level for the general student population. Students cannot receive credit for both CHE100 and CHE103 or for CHE100 taken after CHE101, 111, or 112. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

CHE104 - Math Skills for Chemistry (1 cr.)

A comprehensive workshop covering the general math and algebra skills needed to succeed in General Chemistry or Fundamental Principles of Chemistry I. This course is designed to guide the student through the process of learning how to solve the types of problems specific to general chemistry. This includes the use of calculators, order of operations, solving for an unknown variable, solving multiple equations and the use of unit conversion factors. The course is offered during the first five weeks of the fall semester and can be taken concurrently with CHE101 or CHE111. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CHE107 - Continuing Studies in General Chemistry (4 cr.)

CHE107 is the second course in the sequence, CHE106-107. CHE106 and CHE107 consist of the same material as the single semester course, CHE111, but in addition include an extensive review of basic algebraic operations, techniques to solve algebraic equations, strategies for solving chemistry word problems and study skills that lead to success. Chemistry concepts emphasized in CHE107 include Lewis Structures, shapes of molecules, writing and using stoichiometry of chemical reactions, solution chemistry, energy changes with chemical reactions and the study of gases. After successful completion of CHE107, the student will be prepared for CHE112. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in CHE106.

CHE111 - Fundamental Principles of Chemistry I (4 cr.)

The first semester of a two-semester introduction to general chemistry for science majors. Emphasis will be on the structure of atoms, ionic compounds and molecules, stoichiometry and chemical reactions, periodic trends, properties of gases, models for the electronic structure of atoms and molecules and basic laboratory techniques. Students may not take both CHE101 and CHE111 for credit. Lecture/laboratory. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts.

CHE112 - Fundamental Principles of Chemistry II (4 cr.)

The second semester of a two-semester introduction to general chemistry for science majors. Emphasis will be on the influence of the molecular structure on the properties of solids, liquids and solutions; the properties of solutions; reaction kinetics; acid/base and ionic equilibria; thermodynamics; electrochemistry; nuclear chemistry; and basic laboratory techniques. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in CHE111.

CHE191 - Introductory Seminar in Chemistry (1 cr.)

An entry-level seminar for incoming freshmen and transfer students covering current research and industrial trends and career opportunities in the chemical profession. Industrial contacts through on-campus seminars/field trips. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

CHE199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CHE240 - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (5 cr.)

A one-semester introduction to organic chemistry. Emphasis on hydrocarbons, aromatics, alkyl halides, alcohol, ethers, the carbonyl group, biomolecules and spectroscopic structure determination. Lecture and laboratory. This course does not serve as a prereq for CHE242. Not open for credit to students who have completed CHE241 or CHE271. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: minimum grade of C in CHE112.

CHE241 - Organic Chemistry I (4 cr.)

Saturated, unsaturated, and aromatic hydrocarbons; alkylhalides: their reactions, structure and reaction mechanisms. Stereochemistry, mass spectrometry and UV spectroscopy. (Cannot receive credit for CHE241 and CHE240 or CHE271). (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE112.

CHE242 - Organic Chemistry II (4 cr.)

Alcohol, ethers, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, amines, phenols, carbohydrates and amino acids, their reactions, structure, reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, IR and NMR spectroscopy. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE241.

CHE271 - Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (4 cr.)

Integration of topics from the fields of organic chemistry and biochemistry to provide the student with a basic understanding of the processes of life at the molecular level. Students cannot receive credit for CHE271 if they have completed a semester of organic chemistry, CHE371, or CHE401. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE101 with a grade of C or higher.

CHE299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CHE307 - Geochemistry (3 cr.)

Origin of the elements and chemical differentiation of the Earth. Isotope geochemistry and geochronology including both radiogenic and stable isotope systems. Applications of geochemistry to the solution of global environmental problems such as radioactive waste disposal. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE112 and GEL101.

CHE308 - Environmental Chemistry (3 cr.)

The study of chemical phenomena in the environment. Focus on natural chemical processes in water, air and soil systems; chemical contaminants that pollute these systems; principles of chemical kinetics and equilibria applied to quantitative description of the chemistry of natural systems. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE240 or CHE241.

CHE309 - Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (1 cr.)

Methods of characterization of air, soil and water samples; data analysis and computer modeling of environmental systems, field trip(s) to water treatment facilities. One three-hour lab a week. (Spring). Liberal arts. Recommended corequisite: CHE308.

CHE321 - Analytical Chemistry (5 cr.)

A survey of theoretical principles and practical aspects of classical methods in chemical quantitative (volumetric, gravimetric) analysis. An introduction to some common instrumental methods (spectroscopy, electrochemistry, separations). Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: minimum grade of C in CHE112, and MAT224 (or MAT221).

CHE325 - Culinary Chemistry: Molecular Gastronomy (3 cr.)

Cooking is the oldest application of chemistry. This course will engage students in the exploration of the principles of chemistry and biochemistry involved in the preparation of food and drink. In class demonstrations will illustrate many chemical principles such as extraction, denaturation of proteins and phase changes and show how chefs exert exquisite control over chemical reactions to create gourmet meals. We will also explore how technology has impacted the food industry and how this is important for the health and welfare of our society. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE112, and CHE240 or CHE241 or POI.

CHE360 - Computational Chemistry (2 cr.)

An introduction to computational chemistry, covering basic quantum mechanics, a variety of computational methods, and their applications. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE112, MAT225.

CHE361 - Computational Chemistry (2 cr.)

An introduction to computational chemistry; covering basic quantum mechanics, a variety of computational methods, and their applications. Lecture/Lab. (Spring). Prerequisites: CHE112, MAT225

CHE371 - General Biochemistry (4 cr.)

An introduction to the biochemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucleic acids and biopolymers. A general view of basic cell metabolism and its regulation. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE240 or CHE242.

CHE391 - Written and Oral Reports (3 cr.)

The techniques of communicating ideas and the information in chemistry using proper scientific style. Written/oral assignments will include research proposals, laboratory notebooks, research progress reports, literature searches, and seminar reviews. Students are required to submit a formal proposal to the Department for their research project if they are pursuing a B.S. in the chemistry program. Assistance in writing is done in a multiple draft/revision process to encourage the development of a style that is appropriate for the chemistry professional. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing and completion of 16 credits of CHE courses.

CHE399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CHE401 - Biochemistry I (3 cr.)

The physical and chemical properties of biologically important compounds and their role in biochemical functions in living systems. The relationship between structure and function and the mechanism of control and regulation of biochemical function. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE240 or CHE242 (BIO 101-BIO102 recommended).

CHE402 - Biochemistry II (3 cr.)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence in biochemistry for undergraduate students. Comprehensive survey of the major topics in biochemistry: metabolism, regulation of biochemical processes, and information transfer. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE401, CHE371 or equivalent.

CHE405 - Mini Topics in Chemistry (1 cr.)

Advanced topics in chemistry selected by the instructor. Examples of topics: Chemical Information, Glass Blowing, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification, Polymer Chemistry, Nanoscience, Organometallic Chemistry, etc. Course format can be lecture or laboratory. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior standing.

CHE421 - Instrumental Analysis (4 cr.)

A survey of theoretical principles and practical aspects of instrumental methods in chemical analysis with emphasis on their advantages and limitations in identification and quantitative determination of chemical compounds. Discussion on applications of spectroscopic, chromatographic and electrochemical techniques in resolving problems encountered in inorganic, organic, physical and biochemistry. Lecture/laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PHY112; CHE321 or CHE242; and MAT225 or MAT222.

CHE430 - Inorganic Chemistry I (4 cr.)

Advanced consideration of atomic properties, bonding theories, molecular structure, symmetry analysis, group theory manipulations, acid/base theory, liquid theory, and descriptive chemistry. Lecture and Lab. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE242, MAT225, PHY112.

CHE431 - Inorganic Chemistry II (4 cr.)

Integration of bonding concepts, reaction mechanism formalisms, thermochemical concepts and kinetics in the elucidation of inorganic reaction systems. Systems include coordination, organometallic and bioinorganic systems, application of synthetic and instrumental techniques to the laboratory study of inorganic, organometallic and bioinorganic compounds. Lecture/laboratory. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE430. Corequisites: CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE435 - Topics in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.)

Consideration of topics in inorganic such as: organometallic structure, bonding and reactivity; bioinorganic models, enzymatic processes with metalloenzymes; solid-state chemistry; nanoscience; group theory and chemistry of the main group elements. Topics chosen by instructor. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE431 and CHE452 or CHE456.

CHE442 - Advanced Organic Chemistry (3 cr.)

A physical organic approach to structure and reactions. Advanced Organic Chemistry covers topics including bonding, stereochemistry, carbanions, carbocations, radical processes, functional groups, sophisticated mechanistic schemes, structure reactivity studies, retro-synthetic techniques, and rearrangement reactions. Spectral identification including 2D NMR, IR and MS will be explored as well. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry II (CHE242), Physical Chemistry II (CHE456) or CHE452.

CHE451 - Physical Chemistry I (3 cr.)

The first semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for majors other than chemistry (biochemistry or other majors). Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this first-semester course is on gas laws; work; heat capacity; general thermodynamics; equilibria and rates; and, mechanisms associated with kinetics. This is a lecture only course. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE242, MAT225, and PHY112.

CHE452 - Physical Chemistry II (3 cr.)

The second semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for majors other than chemistry (biochemistry or other majors). Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this second-semester course is on solution chemistry, electrochemistry; quantum mechanics; and spectroscopy. This is a lecture only course. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE455 - Physical Chemistry with Laboratory I (4 cr.)

The first semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for chemistry majors. Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this first-semester course is on gas laws, work, heat capacity; general thermodynamics; equilibria and rates; and mechanisms associated with kinetics. This is a lecture only course with an accompanying laboratory component. (Fall). Liberal arts. Corequisite: CHE455L. Prerequisites: CHE242, MAT225 and PHY112.

CHE456 - Physical Chemistry with Laboratory II (4 cr.)

The second semester of a two-semester sequence of physical chemistry for chemistry majors. Physical chemistry is predominantly concerned with the application of calculus to describe chemical systems. Emphasis in this second-semester course is on solution chemistry, electrochemistry, quantum mechanics, and spectroscopy. This is a lecture course with an accompanying laboratory component. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE481 - Biochemistry Laboratory I (1 cr.)

An introduction to experimental methods of modern biochemistry which may include: spectrophotometry, liquid scintillation spectroscopy, fluorescence, chromatography, enzymology, and protein and/or nucleic acid isolation and purification. The course is designed to lead to independent biochemical investigation via group projects and gradual reduction of detailed instruction. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE401, which may be taken concurrently.

CHE482 - Biochemistry Laboratory II (1 cr.)

A detailed examination of experimental methods of modern biochemistry which may include: spectroscopy, chromatography, electrophoresis, western blots, molecular modeling and genetic engineering using PCR methods. The course is designed to encourage independent biochemical investigation via small group projects. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE401 and CHE481, or CHE371 with permission from instructor.

CHE485 - Physical Biochemistry (3 cr.)

Topics covered include: protein architecture and folding; nucleic acid structures and energetics; structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR; biological spectroscopy with emphasis on absorption, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies; and the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein-ligand interactions. Extended topics will include proteomics, biocalorimetry, hydrodynamics and fourier transform mass spectrometry. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT222 or MAT225, CHE242.

CHE491 - Chemistry Seminar (1 cr.)

Detailed discussions of contemporary topics prepared and presented by the students. Students pursuing the B.S. program in chemistry are expected to present the results of their independent research project as well as the scientific context for the problem studied. Attention given to the details of selecting, preparing, and presenting a scientific topic. Discussion and critique of presentations. Cannot be challenged. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior standing, CHE391 and CHE451 or CHE455.

CHE495 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Laboratory research project individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. Formal reports of research results within the context of previous scientific work are required to be submitted to the sponsor and the department at the completion of the work. Approval for the proposed experience is obtained following established Arts and Science procedures. Course may be repeated. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 2.67 major GPA.

CHE496 - Laboratory Teaching Experience I/II (1 to 3 cr.)

Planning of a lesson, preparation of laboratory materials, chemical demonstrations, and expositions of laboratory protocols in conjunction with a laboratory instructor. Learning objective and valid assessment development. Formal written report for department and sponsor is required at the end of the experience describing how the course learning objectives were achieved. May be repeated once as CHE496: Teaching Experience II. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing or above; minimum GPA in major of 3.0; POI; permission of chair of the department.

CHE498 - Internship (1 to 3 cr.)

Practical field experience in an area of chemical or biochemical study. Learning outcomes developed in agreement between faculty sponsor and field supervisor. Appropriate application material including a comprehensive learning contract and a final written report to the department and faculty sponsor is required. Note: each credit hour requires three hours of on-site experience.

CHE499 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Library-based research project or independent course tutorial individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. If library-based, a formal report of the results within the context of previous scientific work is required to be submitted to the sponsor and the department at the completion of the work. Approval for the proposed experience is obtained following established Arts and Science procedures. Course may be repeated. Liberal arts.

CHE501 - Biochemistry I (3 cr.)

The molecular nature of life, and the structure and chemistry of the four classes of biomolecules: carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and nucleic acids. Integration of chemical and biological principles in understanding the theoretical underpinnings of the field. Students that took CHE401 as an undergraduate may not get credit for this course. (Fall). Prerequisites: CHE240 or CHE242 or equivalent; BIO101 or equivalent recommended.

CHE502 - Biochemistry II (3 cr.)

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence in biochemistry for graduate students. Survey of the major topics in biochemistry: biological processes in chemical terms; metabolism, and chemical regulation, and information transfer. Students that took CHE402 as an undergraduate may not get credit for this course. (Spring). Prerequisites: CHE501 or equivalent or POI.

CHE505 - Mini-Topics in Chemistry (1 to 2 cr.)

Advanced topics in chemistry selected by the instructor. Integration of core concepts required to address chemical problems appropriate to a graduate level. Examples of topics: Advanced Pulsing Techniques in Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Polymer Chemistry, Nanoscience, Organomettalic Chemistry, Biosynthesis, Computational Chemistry, etc. Course can be lecture or laboratory.

CHE521 - Advanced Analytical Chemistry (4 cr.)

An advanced comprehensive survey of theoretical principles and practical aspects of analytical chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the complexity of analytical methods of various instrumental techniques in identification and quantitative determination of chemical compounds. In depth discussion on applications of instrumental methods and their use in experiments designed to resolve problems encountered in inorganic, physical and biochemistry. Credit may not be received for CHE521 if student received credit for CHE421.

CHE535 - Topics in Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3 cr.)

Selected topics in advanced inorganic chemistry from such areas as: organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic, nanoscience, solid state chemistry. In addition to lecture course work, the student will be expected to select a problem within the inorganic area and produce a detailed analysis of it as well as a proposal on experiments that could enhance the understanding of the problem. Students who have taken CHE435 for credit cannot receive credit for CHE535. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CHE431 and CHE452 or CHE456 or comparable undergraduate courses.

CHE585 - Physical Biochemistry (3 cr.)

An advanced course in the physical properties of biological macromolecules and the methods used to analyze their structure and function. Topics covered include: protein architecture and folding; nucleic acid structures and energetics; structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR; biological spectroscopy with emphasis on absorption, fluorescence, and NMR spectroscopies; and the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein-ligand interactions. Extended topics will include proteomics, biocalorimetry, hydrodynamics and fourier transform mass spectrometry. It is expected that students will be exposed to all of the areas covered in physical chemistry with a biological flavor and will appreciate the multidisciplinary nature of this topic. A special topic paper and presentation will be expected as part of the required work. Students that took CHE485 as an undergraduate may not get credit for this course. (Spring). Prerequisite: undergraduate biochemistry course equivalent to CHE401 or permission of the instructor.

CHE595 - Graduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Laboratory research project individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. Designed as a vehicle for students to complete the necessary laboratory work for a Master's Thesis or "significant" research paper. Approval for the proposed experience is obtained following established Arts and Science procedures. Course may be repeated.

CHE596 - Chemistry Teaching Practicum (3 cr.)

Design of a college-level laboratory experience including: course syllabus; schedule; content; lesson plans; demonstrations; lectures; assessment design, teaching; and grading. Design created and executed in close consultation with a faculty mentor. Course requires the approval of the sponsor, chairperson, and Dean. Appropriate Arts and Science approval forms required. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits. Requires weekly laboratory instruction.

CLG199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLG210 - Understanding Leaders and Leadership (3 cr.)

Exploration of general leadership concepts, personal skills development, leadership in organizations and contemporary leadership issues. (Fall - Spring).

CLG220 - Community Service, Social Reflection and Leadership (3 cr.)

Exploration of leadership concepts related to societal issues, volunteerism and meaningful service to others. (Spring).

CLG299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLG310 - Peer Education (3 cr.)

Designed to train students as peer educators by exploring leadership, communication skills and relevant developmental issues. Students will plan, deliver and evaluate educational workshops for a diverse campus community. (Fall/Spring).

CLG311 - Applied Peer Education (1 to 3 cr.)

This course is designed to assist trained peer educations with applying skills of leadership, communication, and health knowledge relevant to young adults. Students will be expected to plan, implement, and evaluate educational programs for a diverse campus community. (Spring). Prerequisite: CLG310.

CLG399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLG402 - Introduction to Counseling Techniques (3 cr.)

Theories and skills of counseling applied to the resolution of personal, educational and vocational problems of clients, with emphasis on interpersonal factors characterizing the counseling interaction. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing, preference granted to HDF majors

CLG403 - Applied Counseling Techniques (3 cr.)

An overview of the application of the most widely used counseling techniques for a variety of settings and clients. (Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing, POI, preference given to HDF majors.

CLG426 - Special Topics in Counseling (1 to 3 cr.)

Selected topics of special and/or emerging concern to students interested in entering the school, student affairs, or clinical mental health counseling fields. (As needed).

CLG499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLG501 - Life Span Development (3 cr.)

Perspectives on the major psychological and socio-cultural issues in human development from birth through advanced age, with an emphasis on theory and applications in counseling. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: Mental Health Counseling, School Counselor, or Student Affairs Counseling majors only.

CLG502 - Career Development Counseling in Schools (3 cr.)

Applications of career and lifestyle development theory, public policy, and resources to counseling and programmatic interventions in PK-12 schools. Emphasis on interventions and developmental approaches with individuals and groups to foster career/lifestyle exploration, self-assessment, choice, decision-making, and transitions. (Fall). Corequisites: CLG510 or CLG513 or CLG540. Prerequisite: majors only.

CLG503 - Theories of Counseling (3 cr.)

Survey of theoretical orientations of the counseling profession, including relevant research and factors considered in applications. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: majors only or POI.

CLG505 - Counseling Relationships and Skills (3 cr.)

Experiential learning of basic counseling processes and skills with an emphasis on counselor understanding of his/her own and client characteristics that influence helping processes. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Corequisite: CLG503. Prerequisite(s): majors only.

CLG506 - Student Affairs Practice (3 cr.)

History, philosophy, purpose and functions of student affairs in varied higher education settings. Student affairs services, issues, problems, and models for designing, implementing, managing, and evaluating student affairs programs. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CLG507 - Ethical Practice and Professional Orientation to Counseling (3 cr.)

Aspects of professional functioning, including analysis of ethical standards, decision-making, history and philosophy, professional roles, functions, and self-care, credentialing, supervision, and current issues in the counseling profession. (Fall/Summer). Prerequisite: Mental Health Counseling, School Counselor, or Student Affairs Counseling majors only.

CLG509 - Assessment in Counseling (3 cr.)

An overview of various psychological tests and inventories that are used by counselors in mental health, community, school, and student affairs settings. Review of statistical concepts for test selection, evaluation and interpretation. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Majors Only or POI.

CLG510 - Professional School Counseling (3 cr.)

Through lecture, in-class activities, and out-of-class activities, students will explore the role of the professional school counselor. Students will focus on learning the essential services of a comprehensive developmental school counseling program along the dimensions of academic, career, and personal/social development. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: Majors only or POI.

CLG511 - Leadership and Advocacy in School Counseling (3 cr.)

This course will expose students to a variety of critical issues in school settings. Through experiential activities and research, school counselors in training will be required to create prevention and intervention strategies consistent with the developmental comprehensive school counseling program model. (Spring). Prerequisite: CLG510.

CLG512 - Pre-Practicum (3 cr.)

Experiential learning of counseling processes and skills with emphasis on counselor understanding of own and client cultural characteristics that influence helping processes; client case conceptualization and treatment planning; suicide assessment, prevention, treatment, and postvention; and counseling responses to crisis, disaster, and trauma. (Fall - Spring). Corequisite: CLG545. Prerequisites: CLG503 and CLG505.

CLG513 - Counseling Practicum (3 cr.)

This course is designed as a field clinical practicum for counselor education graduate students across all programs. Focus is on the theoretical and practical aspects of clinical training. Course promotes further counseling knowledge and skills, and counselor development through the supervised practice of individual and group counseling. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: Majors only; CLG505, CLG509, CLG517, CLG527 (for all counselor candidates); and CLG510 and CLG536 (for school counselor candidates) and CLG539 and CLG547 (for clinical mental health candidates); faculty approval.

CLG514 - Advanced Practicum (2 to 3 cr.)

Advanced supervised experience in counseling focusing on increasing the student's counseling effectiveness in diverse individual and group counseling situations. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CLG 513 and POI.

CLG516 - Psychopathology of Children and Adolescents (3 cr.)

Symptoms, behavioral dysfunctions, and maladaptive responses associated with mental disorders in children and adolescents. Focus on counselor's role in effectively assessing, treating, and providing related services to children and adolescents experiencing mental disorders. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: Mental Health Counseling, School Counseling, or Student Affairs Counseling majors only.

CLG517 - Group Counseling (3 cr.)

This course is designed as an introduction to group work and will provide both theoretical and experiential understandings of group counseling methods and types of groups utilized in counseling. Course will cover group purpose, process and practice including group ethics, development, dynamics, theories, intervention methods and skills, and awareness of other group approaches in a multicultural society. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: majors only; CLG 505.

CLG519 - Substance Abuse Counseling (3 cr.)

Substance abuse counseling assessment, treatment planning, treatment and prevention practices. Includes a study of drugs of abuse, dependence, substance-induced disorders, patterns of abuse and recovery, and risks and challenges within prevention, treatment and recovery contexts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: Counselor Education major; POI.

CLG522 - College Students and Environments (3 cr.)

College students' attitudes, characteristics, developmental processes, needs, and issues affecting development and functioning. Environmental considerations and impact; models for successful learning environments. (Spring).

CLG523 - Introduction to Couples and Family Counseling (3 cr.)

This course serves as an introduction to the origins and development of conceptual approaches for counseling couples and families. There is an emphasis on theories, counselor skills, and techniques for providing family therapy. Experiential learning is a large component of this course and students engage in a variety of activities to practice the materials being studied. Involvement, application, and professionals are organizing themes in the course, as well as key components and expectations in student performance. (Fall).

CLG526 - Special Topics in Counseling (0 to 3 cr.)

Selected problems of special concern to counselors. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer).

CLG527 - Career Development Counseling (3 cr.)

Career development theories and lifespan development. Applications of theory to counseling and programmatic intervention with individuals and groups to foster career/ lifestyle exploration, self-assessment, choice, adjustment, and transitions. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: majors only or POI.

CLG535 - Facilitating College Student Development (3 cr.)

Application of college student development principles in undergraduate learning environments. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CLG522.

CLG536 - Counseling Children and Adolescents (3 cr.)

An overview of developmental/theoretical models and strategies for responding both individually and contextually to the needs of children and adolescents experiencing emotional and/or behavioral problems. (Spring). Prerequisite: Majors Only or POI.

CLG537 - Gender Related Issues in Counseling (3 cr.)

Problems and issues related to gender which are frequently encountered by counselors and clients, with identification of counseling approaches applicable to these issues.

CLG539 - Clinical Mental Health Counseling and Consultation (3 cr.)

Historical foundations of the clinical mental health and community counseling movements, types of counseling agencies and services, counselor roles, program procedures, organizational structures, report writing, recordkeeping, and counseling practice in clinical mental health and community counseling agencies. (Spring). Prerequisites: majors only or POI.

CLG540 - Internship: School (3 to 6 cr.)

Practical applications of the theories and techniques of school counseling, emphasizing the development of proficiency in the counseling process obtained through practice under supervision. May be a repeated for a total of six credits. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: School Counseling majors only; all non-elective program requirements, except CLG554.

CLG541 - Internship: Mental Health Counseling (3 to 9 cr.)

Practical applications of the theories and techniques of mental health counseling, emphasizing the development of proficiency in the counseling process obtained through practice under clinical supervision. May be repeated for a total of nine credits. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Mental Health Counseling majors only; all non-elective program requirements, except CLG554.

CLG542 - Internship: Student Affairs Counseling (3 to 6 cr.)

Practical applications of the theories and techniques of student affairs counseling and professional practice, emphasizing the development of proficiency in the counseling process obtained through practice under clinical supervision. May be repeated for a total of six credits. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Student Affairs Counseling majors only; all non-elective program requirements, except CLG554.

CLG545 - Cultural Contexts of Counseling (3 cr.)

The cultural contexts of counseling in a multicultural and diverse world are studied. Such factors as culture, ethnicity, nationality, age, race, gender, sexual orientation, mental and physical characteristics, ability, education, family values, religious and spritual values, socioeconomic status, and unique characteristics or individuals, couples, families, ethnic groups, and communities are considered. Focus is on development of cultural competencies based on awareness and knowledge about self and others as cultural beings, as well as culturally sensitive application of counseling skills. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Corequisite: CLG512. Prerequisites: CLG503, CLG505.

CLG547 - Psychopathology and Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3 cr.)

Symptoms, behavioral dysfunctions and maladaptive responses associated with mental disorders. Focus on counselor's role in effectively assessing, treating and providing related services to individuals experiencing mental disorders. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: CLG505.

CLG548 - Psychopharmacology in Clinical Mental Health Counseling (3 cr.)

Course examines psychopharmacology as it relates to the practice of clinical mental health counseling from four perspectives: physiological; intrapsychic; social; and cultural. Students will develop knowledge and skills in monitoring the needs and effects of psychoactive medications, scope of practice applications, use of clinical practice/research software and non-electronic aids, and case documentation for clinical standards and managed care reimbursement. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: CLG513, CLG547.

CLG550 - Leadership and Administration in Student Affairs (3 cr.)

Models of leadership and management in higher education settings. Overview of business practices in higher education settings. (Spring).

CLG554 - Research Design & Methods (3 cr.)

Counseling research, program evaluation, and needs assessment methods and design. (Spring). Prerequisite: Majors Only or POI.

CLG556 - Counseling Research and Evaluation Practicum (3 cr.)

Practicum in research and evaluation applied to counseling and prevention topics. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: POI, majors only.

CLG599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLP199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLP299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLP399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CLP499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CMM101 - Introduction to Public Speaking (3 cr.)

Students are introduced to communication theory and ethics before developing the public speaking, writing, listening and interpersonal skills necessary for communicating effectively. Students will comprehend and cultivate basic communication skills by researching, organizing, writing and delivering a minimum of five speeches. Students learn to manage communication apprehension through presenting informative, persuasive, impromptu and special occasion speeches. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

CMM118 - Media and Society (3 cr.)

Examines the development of various communication media including both the traditional forms of mass communication and new digital media. Theories on how different mediated realities are created by distinctive characteristics associated with each medium, usage and exposure patterns of the media consumers, functions and effects of media in transforming human behaviors in social, political, cultural public spheres. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

CMM199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CMM202 - Communication Practicum (0 to 8 cr.)

An individualized learning experience through participation in one or more supervised communication activities. Participation in the Forensics Team, student publications, and/or a special research project qualifies as an appropriate experience. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

CMM209 - Broadcast Announcing Practicum (1 cr.)

Learn broadcast announcing and radio operations. Explore theoretical aspects through weekly lectures and contribute to WARP radio through on-air shifts--delivering music, news, sports, weather, and public service announcements. Research music formats and create air check tapes. No prior radio experience needed. May be repeated for a total of three credits. (Fall/Spring).

CMM210 - Radio Announcing Practicum (1 cr.)

Explore additional radio announcing techniques through weekly lectures and contribute to WQKE radio through on-air shifts - delivering music, news, sports, weather, and public service announcements. Recorded shows are analyzed in class sessions as a means to assist students to develop their radio portfolios. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CMM209.

CMM226 - Introduction to Human Communication (3 cr.)

An introduction to the discipline of communication, its history from the ancient rhetorical tradition to the present, and the process of communication inquiry. A survey of the communication field including: perception, verbal and nonverbal language, listening, interpersonal communication, culture, small group communication, organizational communication, rhetoric, mass media, and emerging technologies. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CMM101.

CMM229 - Basic Video Planning & Production (3 cr.)

A hands-on introduction to the principles and practices of single-camera video field production and post-production linear editing for students with little or no prior experience in video production. Students will be assigned to work as part of a production crew for shooting/editing assignments outside of class time. (Fall/Spring).

CMM232 - Basic Audio Production (3 cr.)

A hands-on production course introducing audio techniques, covering the basics of writing, producing, and engineering audio in radio, television, film, field recording, and live sound environments. Besides traditional analog recording techniques, students gain experience with the basic elements of digital audio recording and processing. Intended for students with little or no prior audio experience. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Fall). Co-requisite: CMM232 lab.

CMM233 - Television Station Operations (2 cr.)

A hands-on experience as a working member of a television station. Students will be required to perform as a technical crew member and/or on-air talent in the operation of a television station. May be taken four times for a total of 8 credits. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CMM229 or POI.

CMM242 - Basic Web Design (3 cr.)

This course addresses an important skill requirement for the department's Digital Media concentration by introducing students to the fundamentals of Web design. In addition to HTML and Web authoring software, students will learn basic digital typography, color theory, layout, and image editing and compositing. (Fall/Spring).

CMM288 - Fundamentals of Electronic Media (3 cr.)

The history and development of various electronic mass media: radio, television, cable, the Internet, and other new technologies. In-depth study of the structure, technology, organization, economics, media sales, media law and ethics, mass media theories, and programming practices of broadcasting and new media industries. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM118.

CMM299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall - Spring)

CMM301 - Communication and Culture (3 cr.)

The intersection of gender and sexuality with other categories of cultural identity such as class, race, religion, and nationality by focusing on communicative practices in everyday life. Examines the social and symbolic construction of culture in mediated (e.g. film, social networks, music, fashion) and non-mediated communication contexts. Examination of the ways people (re)create cultural communities or resist cultural norms, commodification and dominant ideologies. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM101, CMM226.

CMM302 - Global Media and Communication (3 cr.)

Survey of media globalization, the free flow of communication and national sovereignty including political, economic, legal and technological factors. Study of cross-cultural and cross-national mass communication including structure, content, values and impact on various societies and nations; evolution and development of global media giants. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM118.

CMM303 - Health Communication (3 cr.)

A survey course that explores health communication as an emerging and exciting specialty in communication studies and covers the basic theories and principles of communication in health care contexts. Health care settings are a rich environment that allows students to conceptualize the different perspectives and systems of health and health care. Includes an overview of health communication theories and incorporates practical applications (e.g., skill development) into its curriculum. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM101 and sophomore standing.

CMM304 - Business and Professional Speaking (3 cr.)

Discussion of principles of practice associated with public speaking in a range of professional settings. Designed to explore the techniques of effective oral and written communication applicable to both business and professional leaders. Emphasis on creation and delivery of effective career-oriented presentations, such as employment interviews, sales/proposal pitches, and routine and persuasive messages. Speakers hone skills in audience analysis/adaptation, structure and arrangement, manuscript and extemporaneous delivery, and the use of multi-media presentational aids. Provides students with skills necessary for successful life, career, and job choices in the 21st century. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM101.

CMM307 - Argumentation and Reasoning (3 cr.)

Methods for reasoning and techniques of argumentation. Evaluation and selection of evidence, effectiveness of various forms of organization to present an idea or to resolve conflict. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM101.

CMM310 - Small Group Communication (3 cr.)

Discussion of small group communication theory and skills. Students participate in decision making, problem solving, and discussion groups. Emphasis is on groups in organizational contexts although groups such as families, learning groups, and activity groups are addressed. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM226.

CMM312 - Fundamentals of Multimedia Production (3 cr.)

A hands-on production course introducing students to the basic elements of multimedia production (including Web site), an overview of the different types of multimedia applications, and the discovery of the effective uses of templates and interactivity involved in the construction of communication messages in a multimedia environment. Computer proficiency not required. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: CMM118 and sophomore standing.

CMM315 - Applied Media Aesthetics (3 cr.)

This course involves the study of aesthetic principles as applied to television and film images. Topics include the applications of light, color, two and three dimensional fields, time, motion and sound as agents of aesthetic energy. Students will come to understand and appreciate how aesthetic elements help clarify, intensify and interpret media events. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: CMM118.

CMM316 - Intercultural Communication (3 cr.)

Drawing upon various theories and empirical generalizations about how cultural differences manifest, the course examines various roles that the concept of culture plays in a human communication process. After reviewing differences and similarities in communication behaviors as demonstrated by individuals belonging to a variety of different cultural and sub-cultural systems, the course analyzes a variety of different patterns of interaction among those individuals both in the culturally-diverse United States and in the rapidly-globalizing world community. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM226 or CMM288 or ANT 102 or POI.

CMM322 - Mass Media Propaganda, 1900-1945 (3 cr.)

An in-depth examination of the use of political mass persuasion from World War I to the dawn of the Cold War. Theoretical constructs are integrated into a format that is historical in nature. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM101, CMM118.

CMM323 - Mass Media Propaganda, 1945-present (3 cr.)

Examines the role of mass persuasion in global affairs from the end of World War II to the present day. The topics include propaganda's role in the Cold War, the wars in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf War, war in Iraq and the war on terrorism. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: CMM101, CMM118.

CMM325 - Communication Theory (3 cr.)

Exploration of the nature, history and goals of communication theories and theorists. Criteria for evaluating communication theories is discussed and applied. Communication research as it relates to theory and lived experience is addressed. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM226 or CMM288.

CMM328 - Rhetorical Theories (3 cr.)

Examination of Western rhetorical theories from classical, neo-classical, and contemporary periods. Critics to these rhetorical theories are discussed. Students read rhetorical analyses to understand how rhetorical theories are used in political, social, and cultural discourses. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: CMM226.

CMM329 - Interpersonal Communication (3 cr.)

Focus on interpersonal communication theories to help understand dyadic communication. Theories of effective interpersonal communication are examined and applied. Specific topics that will be addressed include meaning and interpretation, verbal and nonverbal processes, gender and cultural identity, listening and speaking skills, conflict management, new technologies & online dating, and relationship formation, maintenance, and deterioration. (Fall). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ENG101, CMM101; CMM226.

CMM330 - Criticism of News Media (3 cr.)

A comprehensive examination of the processes through which journalists "reconstruct" social realities in the form of "news products" and how media consumers make use of those products. Reviews a variety of factors influencing these processes in order to help students develop critical perspectives both as future practitioners of journalism and critical consumers of journalistic products. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM226 or CMM 288; junior standing.

CMM334 - On-Camera Performance (3 cr.)

Introduces the principles and concepts used in on-camera performance, specifically television performance. Includes writing and voice instruction; studio etiquette and weekly performance in a studio setting; enhanced by additional field work. Weekly instructor evaluations enable student performers to concentrate on developing personal styles and techniques. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM229 or POI.

CMM335 - Writing for Radio and Television (3 cr.)

Examination of the techniques, styles, formats, and theories involved in writing for radio and television. Students will practice writing broadcast news stories, commercials and public service announcements, television dramas, and comedy. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM288, ENG101.

CMM338 - Understanding Film (3 cr.)

A technical, aesthetic, and theoretical approach to film study as a unique art form with its own grammar and language. Individual topics such as directing styles, genres, characterization, mise-en-scene, editing, and sound techniques will be examined in the context of individual films and film segments viewed in class. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

CMM348 - Journalism and Media Ethics (3 cr.)

Examine a range of ethical theories relevant to the field of media and journalism; explore major ethical dilemmas and issues that journalists and media professionals face in their day-to-day decision-making. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM118.

CMM360 - Interactive Journalism (3 cr.)

This course combines technical training in Adobe Flash, an industry standard for delivering multimedia content to the World Wide Web, with instruction in journalism and digital storytelling. Students will learn to plan online multimedia projects; to think as professional communicators in gathering information; to capture still images, audio, and video; and to publish materials they collect in Flash packages designed for the Web. (Fall). Prerequisites: JOU317 or CMM242, or CMM312 or POI.

CMM361 - Video Motion Graphics (3 cr.)

A hands-on production course introducing video motion graphics that utilize digital video and various forms of graphic file formats. Industry standard visual effects software including After Effects and Flash will be used to cover diverse practices in visual effects in broadcast, animations in live action, title and logos in different programs. (Fall). Prerequisites: CMM288 and CMM229.

CMM365 - Media and Popular Culture (3 cr.)

An overview of popular culture as presented by the media; address such questions as how do the media frame and shape culture, what is the relationship between media and popular forms of entertainment such as music and sports, and how do issues of gender, race, class, sexual orientation, national origin, and ethnicity affect media portrayal and reception. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM288.

CMM375 - Television Studio Production (4 cr.)

A hands-on television production experience which focuses on the use of multi- camera studio technique and equipment for the production of a variety of television programming. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: CMM375 lab. Prerequisite: CMM229.

CMM385 - Linear and Nonlinear Video Editing (3 cr.)

Advanced hands-on applications in video editing for students who have completed the department's basic television production course (or the equivalent). Includes in-depth examination of the technical and aesthetic factors involved in post-production editing. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CMM229.

CMM390 - Special Topics Seminar in Broadcast Media (3 to 4 cr.)

Special topic areas such as *The Economics of Sports Broadcasting* and *Audience Analysis and Rating Systems* will be considered in-depth. (Fall/Spring/Summer) .Liberal arts.

CMM400 - Producing the Documentary (4 cr.)

An advanced hands-on video production course that includes pre-production design, on-location shooting, and post-production of a short documentary. Students work together in groups of 2-3 to fill the principal roles of the documentary crew. Each group will research, write, direct, and edit their own documentary. (Spring). Corequisite: CMM400 lab. Prerequisite: CMM375 and junior standing.

CMM401 - Political Communication (3 cr.)

This course will examine the role of communication in American politics, the interchange of news, politics, and advocacy and application of public communication principles to political and advocacy campaigns. Students will develop an appreciation of how political communication practices and actions are influenced by rhetoric via old and new media. Topics covered are the role of media relations in politics, the historical and social importance of rhetoric in civic life, and ethical implications of mediated persuasion tactics in the 21st century. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: CMM118 or CMM226 or CMM288.

CMM406 - Speechwriting (3 cr.)

Addresses theory and methods of speechwriting for formal venues and in diverse contexts such as public relations, government/politics, and private sector and non-profit organizational leadership. Emphasis upon rhetorical and language strategies for desired speech outcomes and effects, the conventional principles of this highly specialized form of professional communication, writing for the "ear" and audience message retention, and adaptations when speechwriting for another person. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM101, ENG101, Junior standing or POI.

CMM407 - Concepts of Persuasion (3 cr.)

Emphasis on theories of persuasion. Examination of persuasive strategies used in mass media, advertising, political campaigns, social movements, public presentations and interpersonal relationships, along with their ethical implications. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM118, CMM226.

CMM408 - Audio Field Recording Practicum (2 cr.)

Learn advanced audio engineering techniques by recording music in the field. Develop familiarity with engineering and processing of audio CDs by working with various on-campus clients to record music-based performances. Explore client relations, equipment configuration, post-production processing, and audio CD mastering requirements. May be repeated for a total of six credits. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Co-requisite: CMM408 lab. Prerequisites: CMM428 or CMM464.

CMM409 - Radio Management Practicum (2 cr.)

Acquire and practice radio management skills by contributing to WARP radio broadcasting operations through various radio management positions. In addition, students complete on-air shifts, develop shows, produce audition CDs, and assist in training DJs. May be taken twice for a total of four credits. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CMM209, CMM232.

CMM410 - Leadership Communication (3 cr.)

Focus on theories of communication and leadership in group, public, and organizational contexts. Theories of leadership are compared and evaluated. Relationships between cultural diversity, leadership, and communication are explored. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisite(s): CMM118, CMM226.

CMM412 - Digital Media Practicum (2 cr.)

Learn advanced digital media production techniques by crafting communication messages using advanced digital media tools. Create DVDs, CD-ROMs, Flash animations, broadcast graphics, interactive games, or interactive websites to deliver focused communication messages. May be repeated for a total of four. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM242, CMM312, or POI.

CMM416 - Rhetorical Analysis (3 cr.)

Study of basic theories and methods of rhetorical criticism. Various texts, such as speeches, editorials, political campaigns, songs, and films, are discussed, analyzed and evaluated. Fulfills advanced writing requirement (AWR). Liberal arts.(Spring). Prerequisites: CMM101, CMM226, and ENG101.

CMM417 - Studies in Communication Special Topics (3 cr.)

Selected great speeches, including the evaluation of persuasion techniques, argumentation and reasoning. Techniques of audience adaption and their comparative effectiveness. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: vary with topic.

CMM421 - Broadcast Journalism (3 cr.)

A hands-on study of gathering, writing, editing and presenting news for broadcast media. Emphasis is placed on writing style, news gathering, presentation and performance. Approved AWR. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM229 and ENG101.

CMM422 - Research Methods in Communication (3 cr.)

Covers essential methods in research design, measurement, data analysis, and data interpretation that are frequently adopted in social research - both qualitative and quantitative. Students gain practical experience in instrument construction, use of computerized statistical packages, and research report writing. Highlights ethical issues involving human subjects and the responsibilities of communication professionals when producing/interpreting scientific data. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CMM118, CMM226, or POI.

CMM424 - Digital Animation Production (4 cr.)

Learn how to create, digitize, and manipulate images and sound as a means to create digital video for broadcast platforms. Learn how to construct animations with a variety of application software including Flash. Further develop web design skills by showcasing all projects on the Web. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM242 or CMM312 or CMM385 or POI.

CMM428 - Advanced Radio Production (4 cr.)

Hands-on study of advanced audio production methods used in radio broadcasting. Explore advanced digital production techniques while crafting messages for targeted audience impact. Learn how to produce a wide variety of productions including PSA's, imagers, promos, drops, podcasts, and more. (Spring). Co-requisite: CMM428 lab. Prerequisite: CMM232 or JOU240.

CMM429 - Television Field Acting and Production (4 cr.)

Theory and practice in the live performance and production of dramatic material in non-studio environments with special emphasis on shot continuity and video editing procedures. (Fall). Co-requisite: CMM429 lab. Prerequisite: CMM375 and junior standing.

CMM433 - Television Station Management (3 cr.)

An advanced practical experience in the day-to-day operations and management of a college television station; including producing, directing, engineering, programming and promotion. May be taken twice for a total of six credits. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: CMM233, CMM288, ENG101.

CMM434 - Advanced Web Design (4 cr.)

This course teaches students to assess the needs and expectations of specific Web audiences and to design sites that address those needs and expectations. Students will learn professional standards for designing Web pages using HTML, XHTML, and CSS (Cascading Style Sheets). They will learn to design projects that are based on sound principles of graphic design and that are easy to use and accessible to a broad potential audience. They will learn to write in a style that addresses the demands of a dynamic medium while adhering to principles of sound rhetoric and effective communication. The course includes an overview of using Adobe Flash to provide multimedia content on the Web and popular scripting languages to add user interactivity. (Spring). Prerequisites: CMM242 or JOU317, or POI.

CMM435 - Electronic Media Management (3 cr.)

Examines the business and managerial aspects of electronic media. While the concentration is primarily on programming, sales and promotion, students will also examine the various managerial theories and strategies applied in the managing of an electronic media facility. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM226 or CMM288.

CMM450 - Interviewing: Oral and Written (3 cr.)

Improvement of verbal and nonverbal skills in taking and conducting several types of interviews from informal data seeking to employment interviews. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior standing.

CMM455 - Media Law (3 cr.)

Legal foundations for future practitioners of mass communication. Pertinent cases, precedents, and guidelines within the parameters of the First Amendment rights. Recurring legal issues including freedom of the press, libel, invasion of privacy, copyright, obscenity, commercial speech and broadcasting regulations. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM226 or CMM288; junior standing.

CMM458 - Directing and Producing Television News (3 cr.)

Provides students an opportunity to learn about the essential tools associated with the production of a television newscast. Students are given the opportunity to use those tools in the production of television newscasts. (Fall). Prerequisites: CMM229 and CMM375 (TV Production students). CMM229 and CMM/JOU421 (Broadcast Journalism students).

CMM459 - Advanced Television News Production (4 cr.)

A hands-on study of gathering, writing, editing and presenting news for the broadcast media. Emphasis is placed on writing style, news gathering, presentation and performance. (Spring). Corequisite: CMM459 lab. Prerequisites: CMM458 and ENG101.

CMM464 - Digital Audio Recording Applications (4 cr.)

Advanced audio production course covering the theory and practice of digital audio recording in various professional environments. Hands-on experience provides exposure through production and remixing projects. Students develop their recording, editing, and processing techniques as they create productions for a wide variety of media-based environments including radio, TV, film, music recording, and the internet. (Fall). Co-requisite: CMM464 lab. Prerequisite: CMM232.

CMM470 - Organizational Communication (3 cr.)

Perspectives and theories on communication within a variety of organizational contexts provide an intensive and dynamic area of study. Types of organizations include: for profit corporations, non-profits, NGOs, governments and healthcare establishments. The focus is on how organizational culture is built and sustained through communication, as well as how obstacles to communication flow and effectiveness and diagnosed and addressed. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: CMM226.

CMM490 - Mass Communication Theory (3 cr.)

Traces various theoretical frameworks frequently adopted in theorizing about mass media's roles, functions, and effects for individuals as well as for the society as a whole. Reviews prevalent analytical paradigms underlying mass communication research and their historical transformations. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM226 or CMM288; junior standing.

CMM491 - Senior Seminar (1 cr.)

Students prepare for their future and the transition from undergraduate life to careers and/or graduate school in Communication. Students complete personal assessment and conduct industry-related research to prepare for their upcoming roles in the field. Topics covered include developing employment portfolio content, graduate school preparation, researching salary/compensation packages, corporate culture, and industry trends. Course will be offered on a Pass/Fail basis. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: senior standing.

CMM496 - Tutorial (2 to 3 cr.)

Assist instructor in planning, preparation, class demonstrations, and teaching in undergraduate lectures and/or laboratory sections of CMM courses. Course may not be used for satisfying any of the Major Requirements. Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of instructor and department chair. Course may be taken up to 3 times, but credit may not be received for service as a Lab Assistant for the same course more than once. (Fall/Spring).

CMM498 - Internship (1 to 12 cr.)

The Department of Communication Studies provides a variety of field experiences in professional settings to qualified majors in the areas of Audio Production, Broadcast Journalism, Communications, Radio Broadcasting, and Television Broadcasting. Prerequisites for each type of internship vary, but intern must be a recognized major, having passed CMM101, CMM118, and CMM226 with a "C" or better. Internship credits are not applied to satisfy major program requirements. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

CMM499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall - Spring)

CMM599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

CRI250 - Criminology and the Criminal Justice System (3 cr.)

An introduction to the social scientific study of crime and criminals and to the criminal justice system. Topics include definitions of crime, nature of law, extent and fear of crime, problems of measurement, types of crime, patterns of victimization, characteristics of offenders, and theories of crime. In parallel with the above, the course includes an examination of the basic agencies of the criminal justice system. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

CRI251 - Criminal Law (3 cr.)

An Introductory course in U.S. Criminal Law. Topics covered include the common law roots of the criminal sanction, criminal culpability, the elements of crimes, various defenses, and legal argument in the criminal courtroom. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: SOC101.

CRI253 - Community Corrections (3 cr.)

This course will focus on the basic principles of community correctional method, theory, and practice. Students will cultivate a working vocabulary and basic functional knowledge of community-based supervision for adult and youthful offenders. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: SOC101.

CRI270 - Criminal Investigation (3 cr.)

The course will cover issues ranging from drugs, crime scene procedures, and death investigation, to computer and environmental crimes. The legal issues of interrogation, search and seizure, and arrest will be examined. At the completion of the course, student will have cultivated a working vocabulary and basic knowledge of criminal investigation. (Fall). Prerequisite: CRI250.

CRI311 - Introduction to Justice Research (3 cr.)

This course examines social-science research methods as applied to criminal justice research. Topics include elements of research and methodology, operationalization and measurement, research design, sampling, types and sources of data, ethical considerations, and acknowledging the limits of research and its conclusions. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: SOC101, CRI250, and MAT161.

CRI352 - White Collar Crime (3 cr.)

Examines white-collar crime in American society, with particular emphasis on the crimes of large organizations. Various case studies will be examined to illustrate different aspects of the white-collar crime problem. These include the explanation of corporate and governmental crime, its social control, recent trends in white-collar crime enforcement, and research strategies for studying white-collar crime. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

CRI353 - Punishment and Society (3 cr.)

This course offers a social scientific view of punishment and corrections in the U.S., and seeks to place the study of jails, prisons, capital punishment, probation, parole, and community corrections in a macrosociological and historical perspective. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

CRI354 - Policing and Society (3 cr.)

As a "survey" type of course CRI354 will necessarily touch upon many theories, authors, issues, and problems related to the policing of a free society. It is meant to be a broad introduction to several fields at once; we will study the individual police officer's experience (and that of the police subculture) as well as police organizations and operations. Discussion will avail the student of theoretical as well as practical information relating to the functions of the police. On a regular basis, the endeavor will involve comparing "real life" police work to theories and images, presented throughout our society, of how the police operate. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

CRI356 - Organized Crime (3 cr.)

A realistic concept and historical understanding of the problem of organized criminal activity in the United States within a global context. Focuses on theories and the evolution of organized criminal syndicates from many regions of the world - including Asia, Russia, Europe, Latin America, and Africa - as well as homegrown organized crime, including political and law enforcement corruption and street and prison gangs. Also studies the rapidly evolving relationship between terrorism and organized crime, the emergence of cybercrime, and the latest strategies for investigation and prosecution. Special emphasis on the politics and mythology of organized crime. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101, CRI250.

CRI357 - Courts and Criminal Procedures (3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the structure and process of U.S. criminal courts. Included are concepts of jurisdiction, venue, role of court participants, due process of law, and post arrest procedures employed in the adjudication of trial process and appellate review. Constitutional issues such as prosecutorial discretion, indigent rights, right to counsel, provident pleas, excessive bail, preventive detention, competency, suppression of evidence, compulsory process of witnesses, double jeopardy, and speedy trial will also be addressed. (Spring). Prerequisites: SOC101, CRI250, and criminal justice major or minor.

CRI359 - Human Rights and Justice (3 cr.)

This course covers the theoretical, legal and political aspects of human rights. It addresses the evolution of international human rights and of legal instruments designed for their protection. It will study the theoretical foundations of the idea of human rights in various civilizations and cultures and examine its relevance in dealing with major issues in the contemporary world. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101, criminal justice major or minor.

CRI360 - Minorities and Crime (3 cr.)

This course examines the role of minorities in the criminal justice system. In particular, the course will examine minorities as victims, offenders, defendants, and prisoners. Students will get an overview of various issues in the criminal justice system as they relate to minority status. Both historical and contemporary issues will be addressed. Theoretical frameworks will be introduced to help students better understand minority status and its effects on various aspects of the criminal justice system. Liberal arts. (Every Other Spring). Prerequisites: SOC101 and CRI250.

CRI364 - Victimology (3 cr.)

Victimology is an introduction to the social-scientific study of individuals harmed by criminal acts. Topics include the nature of victimization, the sources of victimization data, the role of the victim in victimization and the impact of the criminal justice system. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101 or CRI250.

CRI370 - Juvenile Delinquency (3 cr.)

Theory and concepts of juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system; factors underlying delinquency; treatment and prevention. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

CRI380 - The War on Drugs (3 cr.)

This analytical course will touch upon many theories, authors, issues, and problems related to the so-called "Drug War" that is being waged on the streets of American and elsewhere in the world. The course develops an understanding of drug usage, the "problem" of drugs, and the regulation of same from philosophical, psychological, sociological, and political perspectives. It ends with a consideration of the geo-political implications of drug baron driven clandestine political operations around the world. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101, CRI250.

CRI382 - Comparative Criminology and Criminal Justice (3 cr.)

This course is a cross-cultural analysis of crime, responses to criminal and deviant behaviors, and systems of justice. The course places crimes and responses within the appropriate social, historical, legal, economic, and/or political context. (Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CRI250 and one of the following: CRI353, CRI354, or CRI357.

CRI384 - Terrorism (3 cr.)

This course will focus on terrorism from a criminological standpoint and pay particular attention to the strategies to reduce terrorism and associated harms. Both domestic and international issues will be addressed in the course. The course will cover the actors, organizations, and crimes that are associated with terrorism as well as some of the theories, sources, history, causes, social conditions, and responses related to the broad topic of terrorism. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101 and CRI250.

CRI393 - Topics in Criminal Justice (3 cr.)

Significant topics relating to the analysis of crime and its correction in modern societies will be offered so as to utilize the research specializations of faculty and provide students with an opportunity to study topics not covered in depth in other courses. Examples: corporate crime, private policing. My be repeated for a total of six credits. Liberal arts. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: SOC101, CRI250.

CRI399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

CRI405 - Selected Issues in Criminal Justice (3 cr.)

A seminar which focuses on key issues in criminal justice. It draws on previous course work in criminal justice, but provides a more in-depth analysis of specific issues. Examines major schools of thought and how they approach these various issues. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, CRI250, and either CRI353 or CRI354. Junior standing.

CRI450 - Ethics in Criminal Justice (3 cr.)

This course covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of criminal justice ethics. Classical, modern, and postmodern ethical perspectives are analyzed from the perspective of the criminal justice practitioner. Approaches to solving ethical dilemmas are applied to the reality of careers in a variety of criminal justice fields - from law enforcement and punishment and corrections, to the role of the prosecutor, defense counsel, and judiciary in the administration of justice. Ethical codes of conduct are critically examined. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CRI250, senior standing, criminal justice major or minor.

CRI490 - Study Abroad in Comparative Criminology (3 to 9 cr.)

This course examines crime and deviance in an international context, with a focus on one country. The course begins with a broad introduction to comparative criminology and criminal justice; measuring cross-national crime, criminality, and victimization; and historical, cultural, and political topics related to the study abroad. The study abroad experience typically consist of lectures by criminologists, lawyers, and other experts; visits to appropriate criminal justice, victim, and drug treatment facilities; and visits to related historical and cultural sites. Destinations will vary. (Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CRI250 and one of the following: CRI353, CRI354, or CRI357.

CRI497 - Applied Criminal Justice Seminar (3 cr.)

This course will be taken concurrently with CRI498 (Applied Internship). It will provide an opportunity for interns to critically evaluate their internship experience and discuss the broad issues that emerge (e.g., criminology, justice system, policing, punishment and correction, etc.). (Fall). Liberal arts. Corequisite: CRI498. Prerequisites: junior standing or above, minimum 2.5 GPA, permission of instructor and chairperson. Must be taken concurrently with CRI498.

CRI498 - Applied Criminal Justice Internship (3 to 12 cr.)

The student placed as an intern in a private or public organization will apply social science methods and theories to a topic of current concern to the host organization. Participation 9-18 hr/wk required. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Corequisite: CRI497. Prerequisites: junior standing or above, minimum 2.5 GPA, POI and chairperson. Must be taken concurrently with CRI497.

CRI499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter).

CSC119 - Introduction to UNIX/Linux (1 cr.)

Study of the features of the UNIX/Linux operating systems from the standpoint of a user. (Fall/Spring).

CSC121 - Introduction to Computing and the Web (3 cr.)

Introduction to computer science through Web-based projects. Describes the basic operations of computers covering hardware and software. Covers the use of communication technology through the Internet. Focuses on problem solving and algorithms. Teaches how programming languages are used to implement solutions to practical problems. Covers social issues associated with computing and computer science. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

CSC123 - Scientific Simulation and Modeling (3 cr.)

Introduction to the use of simulations for scientific study. Students will design experiments and employ the scientific method in the context of simulations in a specific natural science. Students will gain knowledge about computer hardware and software. A programming language will be used as a means to formally describe and solve domain specific problems. Each course offering will focus on a specific discipline for which simulation and modeling is valuable. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

CSC152 - Computer Security and Society (3 cr.)

Survey of the field of computer security at a non-technical level. The course will discuss the importance and role of security as computing becomes more tightly integrated with society. The course will examine the ethical issues related to computer security including privacy, identity theft, and liability. (Fall). Liberal arts.

CSC199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

CSC217 - Logic, Numbers, Machines, and People - Discrete Math with Computer Applications (3 cr.)

An introduction to discrete mathematics with a focus on methods of reasoning and applications to computer science. Topics: propositional logic, first order logic, methods of proof, mathematical induction, elementary number theory. Applications include digital circuits, computer arithmetic, computer algorithms. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MAT102 or equivalent high school course.

CSC221 - Introduction to Programming (3 cr.)

Introduces methods for developing and implementing correct and effective algorithms. Uses an object oriented programming language (currently Python). Attention is given to design strategy, data organization, testing, and documentation. 3 hours lecture and 2 hour laboratory. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Corequisites: familiarity with UNIX/Linux or CSC119 or CSC219. Prerequisite: familiarity with programming or CSC121 or CSC123.

CSC223 - Data Structures and Algorithms (3 cr.)

Organization of data with associated algorithms into arrays, lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, sets, and maps. Includes programming projects with object-oriented design principles using appropriate data structures. Algorithms are analyzed using the Big O notation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC217; CSC221 with a grade of C or better.

CSC285 - Topics in Computing (1 to 4 cr.)

A course on topics in computing of current interest (in a seminar format, lecture format, lab format or a combination). Offers a wide perspective; accessible to majors and non-majors. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (Occasional). Prerequisites: vary with topic.

CSC299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

CSC310 - Perl (1 cr.)

Introduction to Perl programming language. Students will design, run, and debug programs. (Fall). Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC311 - Computer Language (1 to 4 cr.)

Introduction to a single high-level programming language or data representation language. Programs in the particular programming language will be designed and run, or tools for processing data represented in the language will be used. May be retaken for credit with a different language. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC312 - Computer Language (1 to 4 cr.)

Introduction to a single high-level programming language or data representation language. Programs in the particular programming language will be designed and run, or tools for processing data represented in the language will be used. May be retaken for credit with a different language. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC313 - Computer Language (1 to 4 cr.)

Introduction to a single high-level programming language or data representation language. Programs in the particular programming language will be designed and run, or tools for processing data represented in the language will be used. May be retaken for credit with a different language. (Fall). Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC314 - Non-Imperative Programming (3 cr.)

An introduction to functional and logic programming languages. Covers the conceptual foundations, semantics, and syntax of each language and discusses the nature of the functional and logic programming paradigms. Programs appropriate to the languages will be designed and run. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC318 - Discrete Mathematics with Computer Science Applications II (3 cr.)

A continuation of CSC217 focusing on applications in computer science. Topics: sets, functions, and graphs, combinatorics, elementary probability. Applications include formal languages, finite-state automata, analyzing recursive algorithms, applying graph algorithms. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC217.

CSC319 - Programming in C and C++ (3 cr.)

The programming language C and C++ for students with substantial programming experience in some other language. (Every third semester). Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC320 - System Administration (1 cr.)

Overview of the concepts and techniques of computer system administration. Topics will include privilege models, user management, kernel software, system services, system security and scripting. (Fall). Corequisite: CSC119. Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC321 - Design and Analysis of Algorithms (3 cr.)

Course presents general techniques for the design of algorithms. These include divide-and-conquer, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, and randomized algorithms. Specific algorithms are studied which are drawn from a variety of applications - bioinformatics, scheduling, encryption, graphics, search space. Advanced data structures - graphs, balanced trees - will be studied with applicable algorithms. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC223 (grade of C or better).

CSC323 - System Administration Tools (1 cr.)

In depth presentation of select system administration tools. Students will learn how to use the tools presented as well as the theoretical and design issues in the area. May be repeated for a total of three credits as topic varies. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CSC320.

CSC330 - Human Computer Interfaces (3 cr.)

Aspects of human-computer interaction will be studied including models of perception, cognition, attention, representation, memory, identity, interaction styles and feedback. The role of information visualization in interfaces will be explored. Students will also learn how to perform empirical studies to evaluate computer interfaces. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC121 or CSC221.

CSC333 - Computer Organization (3 cr.)

A study of the organization and the structure of hardware components of computers and concepts and techniques of programming in machine assembly language. Emphasis is placed upon the relationships of machine language to computer architecture and higher level languages. The relationship between user applications, operating systems, and computer hardware is discussed. (Every third semester). Liberal arts. Prerequisite or corequisite: CSC221

CSC336 - Software Engineering I (3 cr.)

This course will provide an introduction to current practices in software engineering. The role of software metrics to manage software projects, evaluate software processes, and track software quality will also be examined. (Fall, Spring). Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC341 - Introduction to Databases with Web Applications (3 cr.)

Designing a database using entity-relationship diagram, implementation of a database and querying in SQL, writing external programs to access the database, languages for creating web pages and writing server side programs to provide dynamic web content from a database. Requires a programming project involving all the topics above. (Spring). Prerequisite: CSC310.

CSC345 - Artificial Intelligence (3 cr.)

A survey of procedural and representational techniques used to study or simulate intelligent behavior. The nature of intelligence, machine and human, will be considered. Research developments will be reviewed. Theoretical and ethical limitations will be discussed. A significant programming or writing project will be expected from the student. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC221 and CSC217.

CSC352 - Computer Security (3 cr.)

A survey of the theory and practice of computer security. Topics will include mandatory and discretionary access control, cryptography, policies, mechanisms, profiles, and threat assessment. (Every odd year in Spring). Prerequisite: CSC221 or equivalent.

CSC357 - Computer Networks (3 cr.)

Overview of computer networks with particular emphasis on the Internet. The layered architecture of the Internet is presented with their related algorithms and current protocols. Security issues are also examined. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC221.

CSC372 - Ethics in the Age of Technology and Information (3 cr.)

Investigation of the relationship between computers and society in terms of ethical issues such as: personal privacy vs. societal security; intellectual property vs. free speech; dehumanization and loss of autonomy vs. rehumanization; and application of artificial intelligence. Approved AWR. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101; LIB105; CSC121 or experience in programming; junior standing

CSC399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

CSC422 - Theory of Computation (3 cr.)

Theoretical foundation of computer science. Considers classes of languages, formal grammars, and automata and the relationships among them. Decidable and undecidable problems. May include topics from recursive function theory or complexity theory. (Every even year in Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC318 or MAT231.

CSC433 - Operating Systems (3 cr.)

The design of systems that manage computer resources (processor, memory, disks and other peripheral devices) in a multitasking environment. Attention to concurrency problems and their solutions. Process and thread scheduling. Strategies for data storage management. Mechanisms that provide system and user security. Approaches to system deadlock. (Every third semester). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC319, CSC333.

CSC436 - Software Engineering II (3 cr.)

This course will instruct students in application of software engineering principles to a medium sized software project. Students will work in teams using an agile software process to gain experience with all aspects of the software development cycle. The topics covered will include personal productivity, customer interaction, team productivity, communication skills, process improvement, and project management in the context of a semester long project. May be taken a second time for credit with a different project topic. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: CSC336.

CSC437 - Theory and Implementation of Programming Languages (3 cr.)

A study of the general principles and concepts for understanding and analyzing programming languages, and the major techniques for language implementation. Languages will be compared and analyzed with respect to their semantics, syntax and underlying models of computation. The basic techniques for implementing compilers and interpreters will be covered. A substantial language implementation project will be required. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC319 or CSC314 or two credits from CSC313.

CSC441 - Database Management Systems (3 cr.)

Relational database design and implementation. Core topics include: record and file organizations, access structures, entity-relationship model, relational algebra and calculus, relational model functional dependencies and normalization, SQL, database implementation and application programs. Bioinformatics databases and related programming libraries. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC318, CSC223.

CSC442 - Data Mining (3 cr.)

The theory, algorithms, and design of data mining and data warehousing systems. The course will cover the knowledge discovery process and the use of machine learning in data mining. (Even Years in Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC321, and CSC341 or CSC441.

CSC445 - Knowledge Representation and Inference (3 cr.)

Methods of knowledge representation in order for an intelligent system to make inference about the world. Covers frames languages, semantic nets, conceptual graphs, production systems, first-order logic representations and inference, statistical methods, probability and uncertainty, non-monotonic and default reasoning, common sense reasoning. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CSC318 or MAT231.

CSC446 - Software Design Studio (3 cr.)

This course will instruct students in application of software engineering principles to a medium sized software project. Students will work in teams using an agile software process to gain experience with all aspects of the software development cycle. Object oriented programming principles and appropriate data structures will be applied in the context of a semester long software project. (Fall, Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC336 and CSC223 (grade of C or better).

CSC451 - Computer Graphics (3 cr.)

Rendering graphics objects on any output device with the intervention of a graphical processing unit (GPU). Writing programs with an emphasis on interactive graphics, using OpenGL and graphics libraries. Fundamental algorithms of two and three dimensional computer graphics. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC221 and MAT202 or POI.

CSC452 - Threat Analysis and Modeling (3 cr.)

Identification, analysis, and modeling of security threats in computer applications, systems, and networks. Topics will include protocol design and analysis and configuration management. (Odd Years in Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC330 or CSC336 or CSC341 or CSC441, and CSC352.

CSC453 - Introduction to Numerical Methods (3 cr.)

Introduction to methods of solution to numerical problems. Emphasis is given to obtaining accurate results by utilizing methods of estimating the magnitude of error and techniques for controlling error. Numerical algorithms used in programming problems include: synthetic division, root finding, interpolation, least squares, numerical integration and solution of ordinary differential equations. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MAT225.

CSC456 - Reliable Systems (3 cr.)

The process of building high assurance systems and techniques for fault detection and recovery. System reliability will be discussed at the hardware, middleware, and application level. (Even Years in Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CSC223, CSC336.

CSC462 - Intrusion Detection (3 cr.)

The defense in depth approach to network security, with a focus on the role of intrusion detection systems. Techniques of identifying, modeling, and reacting to unauthorized activity will be covered. Liberal arts. (Fall Odd Semesters). Prerequisites: CSC345, CSC352, CSC357.

CSC485 - Advanced Topics in Computing (1 to 4 cr.)

A course on topics in computing of current interest (in a seminar format, lecture format, lab format or a combination). May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Liberal arts. (Occasional). Prerequisites: vary with topic.

CSC495 - Undergraduate Research (2 to 6 cr.)

Research project individually arranged between student and faculty member. May be repeated for credit. (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

CSC496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 2 cr.)

Designed for students who will work under the supervision of a faculty member to assist in the instruction of a course. A contract specifying the responsibilities of each student will be filed in the department. May be taken twice for a total of six credits with chairperson's permission. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

CSC497 - Computing Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Participate in software development, system administration, or other applied computing experiences within the Computer Science Department. May be taken twice for a total of six credits. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: six credits in upper level CSC courses.

CSC498 - Internship in Computer Science (1 to 15 cr.)

Computer science activity at an industrial or research facility. (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). Prerequisite: six credits in upper level CSC courses and department chair approval.

CSC499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

CSC522 - Theory of Computation (3 cr.)

Theoretical foundation of computer science. Considers classes of languages, formal grammars, and automata and the relationships among them. Decidable and undecidable problems. May include topics from recursive function theory or complexity theory. The topics and assignments are broader and/or go more in depth than in CSC422: a research or programming project is required. This course is open only to graduate students or undergraduates who are within 15 credits of graduation. Students can receive credit for this course only if they have not received credit for CSC422. (Occasional).

CSC533 - Operating Systems (3 cr.)

The design of systems that manage computer resources (processor, memory, disks and other peripheral devices) in a multi-tasking environment. Attention to concurrency problems and their solutions. Process and thread scheduling. Strategies for data storage management. Mechanisms that provide system and user security. Approaches to system deadlock. The topics and assignments are broader and/or go more in depth than in CSC433: a research or programming project is required. This course is open only to graduate students or undergraduates who are within 15 credits or graduation. Students can receive credit for this course only if they have not received credit for CSC433. (Every third semester).

CSC541 - Database Management Systems (3 cr.)

Relational database design and implementation. Core topics include: record and file organizations, access structures, entity-relationship model, relational algebra and calculus, relational model functional dependencies and normalization, SQL, database implementation and application programs. Bioinformatics databases and related programming libraries. The topics and assignments are broader and/or go more in depth than in CSC441: a research or programming project is required. This course is open only to graduate students or undergraduates who are within 15 credits of graduation. Students can receive credit for this course only if they have not received credit for CSC441. (Occasional).

CSC545 - Knowledge Representation and Inference (3 cr.)

Methods of knowledge representation used by an intelligent system to make inference about the world. Covers frames languages, semantic nets, conceptual graphs, production systems, first-order logic representations and inference, statistical methods, probability and uncertainty, non-monotonic and default reasoning, common sense reasoning. The topics and assignments are broader and/or go more in depth than in CSC445; a research or programming project is required. This course is open only to graduate students or undergraduates who are within 15 credits of graduation. Students can receive credit for this course only if they have not received credit for CSC445. (Occasional).

CSC585 - Topics in Computing (3 cr.)

A course on topics in computing of current interest (in a seminar format, lecture format, lab format or a combination). May be repeated for credit with a different topic. The topics and assignments are broader and/or go more indepth than in CSC485: a substantial research or programming project is required. The course is open only to graduate students or undergraduates who are within 15 credits of graduation. Students can receive credit for this course only if they have not received credit for CSC485 with the same topic. (Occasional). Prerequisites: vary.

ECO101 - Principles of Economics (3 cr.)

Principles of macro and micro economics; analysis of policies concerned with employment and national income, including fiscal and monetary policies, international trade and finance, and economic growth and development. Micro topics include consumer behavior, the theory of the firm and resource allocation. Also covered: economic issues including pollution, poverty, productivity and minority and gender issues. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ECO110 - Introduction to Microeconomics (3 cr.)

Exposes the beginning student to introductory economic concepts directly related to the individual, the firm, and the resource owners. In an institutional context, students will study economic organization, supply and demand, utility, general price determination, cost analysis, types of competition, and the theory of production. Specific applications of factor pricing and other topics may also be covered. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: high school mathematics 11 or one semester of a college mathematics course.

ECO111 - Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 cr.)

Overview of the market economy, national income measurement and determination, the banking system and the role of money, monetary and fiscal policy, unemployment and inflation, economic growth, international trade and comparative advantage. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ECO199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ECO201 - Intermediate Microeconomics (3 cr.)

Tools of modern price theory: consumer behavior, the firm, the factor market, the general equilibrium theory, and the welfare implications of a market system. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO101 or ECO110; MAT221 or MAT224 or HON144.

ECO202 - Intermediate Macroeconomics (3 cr.)

National income determination theory, classical, Keynesian and post-Keynesian developments; theories of inflation, investment and economic growth. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ECO101 or ECO111.

ECO260 - Business Statistics I (3 cr.)

Introduction to descriptive statistics, probability, correlation, sampling, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals applied to social, business, and economic data. Also, discrete and continuous probability distributions - uniform, poisson, binomial, normal, and exponential. Extensive use of Excel for data analysis, graphical and tabular presentation. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ECO299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

ECO303 - Environmental Economics (3 cr.)

Economic aspects of environmental issues: energy-environmental interactions, economic damages from residuals and optimizing criteria for use of the environment. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ECO101 or ECO110.

ECO362 - Business Statistics II (3 cr.)

Review of continuous and discrete probability distributions, descriptive statistics, and correlation. In-depth discussion of hypothesis testing applied to univariate and multivariate analyses, including multiple regression and chi-square tests of independence. Also, model diagnostics, quality control, and non-parametric hypothesis testing. Extensive use of Excel and SPSS for statistical analysis, graphical and tabular presentation. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ECO260 or MAT161.

ECO380 - Public Finance (3 cr.)

Fiscal theory and policy; effects of taxation, governmental expenditure programs and public debt operations. Public revenue and expenditure structure on resource organization, income distribution, employment, prices and economic growth. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ECO101 or ECO111.

ECO391 - International Trade (3 cr.)

Economic foundations of the international movement of goods and services, labor, investment funds, business enterprises and technology. Emphasis on global economic interdependence. Production specialization, gains from international trade, inter and intra industry trade and international economic institutions and cooperation emphasizing the role of NAFTA in the US and Canadian economies. Liberal arts. (Occasional). Prerequisite: ECO101 or ECO111.

ECO392 - History of Economic and Financial Thought (3 cr.)

The evolution of economic and finance theory, knowledge and vision with emphasis on the 18th century and after, especially the great economists from Adam Smith to present. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ECO111, ENG101.

ECO399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

ECO435 - Economic Issues (3 cr.)

Analysis and debate of current economic issues, such as supply-side economics, federal debt, comparable worth, the welfare system, third-world debt, free trade and protectionism, social responsibility of business, the future of capitalism, tax reform. (Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ECO111, ENG101.

ECO440 - National Income and Business Forecasting (3 cr.)

The use of national income accounts in forecasting aggregate demand variables. Construction and analysis of economic indicators, and development and understanding of macro and micro forecasting models for better planning and decision making at the industry and corporate levels. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO101 or ECO111; ECO260 or ECO362.

ECO443 - Selected Topics in Economics (3 cr.)

A course or seminar dealing with advanced economics topics of current interest. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO101 or ECO110; ECO111.

ECO452 - Economics of Development (3 cr.)

Theoretical examination of the process of economic development in economically depressed areas of both developed and developing countries. Comparative and case studies are used to identify problems, policies and prospects for economic growth. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ECO101 or ECO111.

ECO470 - Introduction to Econometrics (3 cr.)

Application of statistical inference, probability and other theories to economic data, focusing on multiple regression analysis, time series and model building. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO110; ECO101 or ECO111; ECO260 or ECO362.

ECO487 - Economics Exit Exam (0 cr.)

Course consists of administration of the Economics Exit Exam that serves as an assurance of learning standards by students in the SBE. A passing grade on the exam is a graduation requirement for SBE students majoring in economics. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing and ECO201, ECO202, ECO260, ECO362, one of ECO392, ECO435, ECO470, and ECO490 as a prerequisite or corequisite.

ECO490 - Senior Seminar for Economics and Finance (3 cr.)

Research seminar for graduating seniors in economics. Based on a topic of the student's choice, supervised research culminates in an original paper. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: prior completion of all other requirements for the economics major or POI

ECO498 - Internship in Economics (1 to 6 cr.)

Advanced students may work in a professional setting in either a private business or government agency. Students will spend approximately ten hours weekly working on applied economic problems under the supervision of a faculty member and an on-site supervisor. (Fall, Summer, Spring). Prerequisite: 24 hours of economics and permission of the internship committee.

ECO499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

EDA500 - Theories of Educational Administration (3 cr.)

Theories, principles, and concepts of educational administration, leadership, and management applicable to elementary and secondary schools. (Summer, Winter, Fall).

EDA5000 - Digital Age Learning (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide aspiring school leaders with a working knowledge of the vital role of technology in today's school systems. Beginning with a review of current literature and standards documents such as the ISTE-NETS, ISLLC, and TEAC Standards, this course provides pre-service administrators with exposure to a wide range of instructional and administrative technology, including, but not limited to, student management systems, emerging technologies, assistive technology, acceptable use policies, social networking, cyberbullying, and other relevant social, ethical, cultural, and legal issues involving schools and technology. In addition, this course provides participants with the opportunity to develop an engaging multimedia presentation for use in a school setting in an administrative capacity. (At Least Once per Year).

EDA5010 - Managing Organizational Systems and Safety (3 cr.)

This course will help prepare aspiring administrators to manage organizational systems and safety. Students will study the financial support for public schools from local, state, and federal governments and understand the importance of the budget process in achieving educational goals and objectives. Students will examine aspects of organizational structure and behavior and learn how to support a safe and healthy learning environment for all students. All coursework is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE-NETS Standards. (At Least Once per Year).

EDA502 - Educational Leadership and Organizational Behavior (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce prospective leaders to organizational behavior and process of organizational development. School leaders need to know how to assess needs, establish priorities, set goals, allocate resources, and develop and implement strategic plans in order to facilitate the development of effective educational programs and practices. In addition, they need to develop the ability to involve others in the development, planning and implementation phases of school improvement efforts. Major topics include organizational theory, the human dimension in organizations, organizational change, leadership, and school reform. (Summer, Fall).

EDA5020 - Teaching and Learning: Student Assessment (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide aspiring school administrators with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively use data to improve instruction. Students will analyze comprehensive assessments, understand issues related to assessments, and utilize data to make sound use of assessments, performance management, and accountability strategies to improve student achievement. Students will collect a variety of assessment data and work collaboratively to construct a coherent instructional plan that will improve instruction and student learning. Students will use research-based data improvement plans and current technology to create the plan. Students will be responsible for developing a major independent project on Assessment of Teaching and Learning Using Student Assessment Data for their e-portfolio. All course work is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE-NETS Standards. (At Least Once per Year).

EDA5030 - Teaching and Learning: Curriculum (3 cr.)

This performance-based course will assist students in developing and demonstrating basic skills of curriculum planning, evaluation, and supervision. Supervision skills in building climate and culture, assessment, observation, collaboration, and conferencing will be developed and practiced. Contemporary theories of curriculum design and evaluation are explored. From this study of current theoretical thought, candidates are expected to develop a personal theory base from which to approach curriculum improvement within the context of contemporary organizational factors, including leadership and management. A particular focus on New York State Common Core State Standards serves as an organizing theme of this course. Activities and materials prepare the student to assume a leadership role in developing school and community education programs to successfully achieve Common Core State Standards. Discussions, simulations, direct classroom observation, conferencing, team building activities, case studies, readings, and guest presenters will serve as the primary instructional methods. All course work is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE-NETS Standards. (At Least Once per Year).

EDA504 - Educational Leadership and Human Relations (3 cr.)

A study of theory, research, and practice in the area of human relations in schools including public relations; clear and appropriate communications; and equitable, sensitive, and responsive relations with students, teachers, parents and community. (Spring).

EDA5040 - Teaching and Learning: Professional Standards (3 cr.)

This performance-based course will assist students in developing and demonstrating basic skills of supervision for the improvement of instruction. Knowledge and skills in formative and summative teacher evaluation, building climate and culture, observation methods, collaboration, and conferencing will be developed and practiced. Discussions, simulations, direct classroom observation, conferencing, team building activities, case studies, readings, and guest presenters will serve as the primary instructional methods. While students will study broadly accepted concepts of instructional supervision, this course will have as its primary focus the New York State requirements for Annual Professional Performance Review (APPR). A practical guide to the implementation of APPR with both novice and master teachers will be the product produced upon successful completion of EDA5040. All course work is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE-NETS Standards. (At Least Once per Year).

EDA5050 - Instructional Leadership: Organizations and Change (3 cr.)

This course will help prepare aspiring administrators to become instructional leaders. Students will be expected to work in teams to diagnose student learning needs. Students will be exposed to change management theory and practices and use this knowledge to improve a school's instructional program. Students will learn through research of instructional leadership topics and case studies, and by working in small learning teams to analyze specific school practices and the instructional leader's role in improving the school culture to enhance student learning. All course work is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE-NETS. (At Least Once per Year).

EDA506 - The Principal (3 cr.)

Improvement of classroom instruction through effective supervision subjected to theoretical and practical examination. Review of basic goals, concepts, and processes; critical analysis of specific methods, techniques and problems. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDA5060 - School Law, Ethics, and Integrity (3 cr.)

The goal of this course is to provide aspiring administrators with a strong background in educational law enabling them to meet the legal challenges associated with the field of education. Students will be expected to work individually and collaboratively with other members of the class to analyze case studies and provide information to determine case outcomes or in another sense what the district(s) could have done differently to prevent the legal issue from arising. This process will include researching topics (e.g., 3020a, Part 83, Collective Bargaining, etc.) within their individual districts to present their findings for critique. The culminating activity for the course is designed for students to do research on a legal topic of interest, present their findings, defend their conclusions, and be subject to inquiry (a written submission of their research is required). All course work is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE-NETS Standards. (At Least Once per Year).

EDA5070 - ISLLC Seminar Series: Application of Standards to Practice (3 cr.)

Provides interns with continuous and timely support during ten seminar series meetings. Students' work will include large and small group interactive tasks; Socratic deliberations; video exercises requiring decision making review and analysis; case studies of relevant issues; current educational events of a local, state, national, and global perspective; study of best educational leadership practices and peer-reviewed research; guest speakers; and personal reflections on observations and experiences which will result in a cumulative self assessment and digital, multimedia presentation to peers at the conclusion of the seminar series. (At Least Once per Year). Prerequisites: EDA5000, EDA5010, EDA5020, EDA5030, EDA5040, EDA5050, and EDA5060.

EDA508 - Curriculum Improvement (3 cr.)

Contemporary theories of curriculum design and evaluation are explored. Candidates are expected to develop an eclectic approach to curriculum improvement based upon those theories and contemporary organizational factors, including leadership and management. Material is presented relating to developing community education programs, and to personnel and program planning. (Summer).

EDA5080 - Education Administrative Internship (3 cr.)

The internship is an integrated experience in the Educational Leadership Program. The internship is spread over an entire school year. Interns are expected to participate in school functions that occur before and after college semesters begin and end. Each intern has a mentor, who is an experienced administrator and practitioner who signs a contract agreeing to the requirements which comprise the experience. In addition, an internship supervisor will be assigned during each semester of the internship. This highly experienced school leader will make periodic site visits to meet with the intern and mentor, in order to assess progress and/or needs. The intern is expected to maintain a log of experiences during the internship which serves as evidence of the ability to demonstrate the identified competencies. Can be repeated for a total of six credits. (At Least Once per Year). Prerequisites: EDA5000, EDA5010, EDA5020, EDA5030, EDA5040, EDA5050, and EDA5060.

EDA510 - Supervision for the Improvement of Instruction (3 cr.)

This course will examine the communication, relationship, and problem solving skills required in the role of the principal in working effectively with teachers. This course details skills needed to work effectively with teachers individually and with the faculty as a group in creating a school culture for work. (Fall).

EDA512 - Public School Law (3 cr.)

Intended for administrators and prospective administrators and teachers interested in the legal perspectives of schools. The constitutional, statutory, regulatory, and contractual aspects of public teaching contracts, labor relations, collective bargaining, and tenure. (Summer, Fall).

EDA513 - School Business Administration (3 cr.)

A study of the financial support for public schools from local, state, and federal governments. The following topics will be addressed: fiscal planning, budgeting, plant management, state and municipal financing, accounting and purchasing procedures, distribution of supplies and services, transportation, and food service. (Spring, Summer).

EDA529 - Internship I - Educational Administration and Supervision (3 cr.)

Administrative and supervisory experiences in a public school system. Credit will not be given until thesis/ research project has been completed. Prerequisites: Permission of student's program advisor and the Coordinator of the Internship Experience. Note: The student must be enrolled in the 42 or 60 hour certificate options in Administration/Supervision. (Spring, Summer, Fall).

EDA530 - Internship II Educational Administration and Supervision (3 cr.)

The internship is an integrated experience in the Educational Leadership program at SUNY Plattsburgh. It requires 200 hours of experience over a school year and is guided by a set of competencies based on the ELCC (AASA, ASCD, NASSP, and NAEP) standards. Requirements for these courses are included with a packet which contains an outline of the objectives of the internship contract. Each intern has a mentor who is an experienced administrator and practitioner who signs a contract agreeing to the requirements which comprise the experience. Orientation and training for interns and mentors is held prior to and during the internship period. (Spring, Fall).

EDA556 - Technology Trends for Tomorrow's Administrators (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide aspiring school administrators with technological knowledge and skills necessary for success in today's school systems. In order to complete class projects, access to a computer system, along with Internet connectivity, will be required. (Fall). Prerequisite: Matriculation in the CAS Program in Educational Leadership.

EDA557 - Understanding Assessments for Administrators (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide aspiring school administrators with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand a variety of assessments and to use data from the assessments for planning. In order to complete class projects, access to a computer system, along with Internet connectivity, will be required. (Spring). Prerequisite: Class members must be matriculated in the CAS Program in Educational Leadership.

EDA5600 - School District Leader: Board and Community Relations and Internship (4 cr.)

This performance-based course will assist students in developing and demonstrating basic skills needed to work effectively with internal and external stakeholder in the school setting. Students who complete this course will gain knowledge and skill needed to promote the success of all students by collaborating with families and community members, responding to unique community needs and interests, and gaining public support to mobilize actions within the school setting. As a broad outcome of this course, students will gain an appreciation of the political process that is the reality of school community relations and understand the role of the school superintendent in directing the response to such reality. Discussions, simulations, direct observation of school and community events, conferencing, team building activities, case studies, readings and guest presenters will serve as the primary instructional methods. These methods are designed to allow students to experience the wide range of responsibilities that superintendents face in the daily exercise of their responsibilities. All course work is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE NETS Standards. (Fall). Prerequisites: completion of SBL 30 credit hour requirements.

EDA5602 - School District Leader: Lead Evaluator, Law, Contracts, Ethics and Accountability (4 cr.)

This course is designed to provide aspiring school district leaders with a strong background knowledge of the school district leader's role as a lead evaluator of professional and support staff; to understand the school district leader's responsibility to address complex legal and ethical issues; to negotiate fair and ethical contracts with multiple constituent groups; and to recognize the school district leader's responsibility for the school district's accountability to the multiple stakeholders within the school district's boundaries and the broader political landscape for all actions taken in this leadership role. All coursework is aligned with TEAC, ISLLC, and ISTE NETS Standards. (Spring). Prerequisites: completion of SBL 30 credit hour requirements.

EDA599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Summer, Fall).

EDM199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDM299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDM399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDM453 - Introduction to Teaching/Learning Elementary Mathematics (3 cr.)

Course provides pre-service teachers with an introduction to concepts, issues, methods and materials they will encounter as elementary teachers of mathematics. Instruction cultivates research-proven techniques for teaching K-6, concepts, skills, and processes. All lessons are connected to New York State Mathematics Standards and fully integrate the latest hardware and software technology. (Fall - Spring - Summer). Prerequisite: EDU330.

EDM499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDM506 - Teaching Elementary School Mathematics (3 cr.)

Curriculum, philosophies of teaching and learning, program aims and concepts, instructional strategies and aids, evaluation procedures and trends. Current research on methods for teaching/learning. Not open to students having taken EDM453. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisite: EDU505 for MST students.

EDR199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDR201 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Literacy for Birth-Grade 2 (4 cr.)

Aspects of development of children from birth to age eight in all of the critical domains. Planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum, instruction, and literacy experiences for children from birth to age eight, including those with exceptional needs. Includes a 25-hour supervised field experience with young children. (Spring). Prerequisites: matriculation into BS/MSED in early childhood education, childhood education/literacy education (birth to grade six) combined program and EDU230.

EDR299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDR315 - Multicultural Competencies and the Language Arts (3 cr.)

Develop multicultural competencies in order to respond to diversity in classrooms through use of literacy curriculum and instruction adapted to the specific needs and interests of children. Affirm, respect, and value cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity and understand the interrelation of culture, language, and literacy development. Study the language arts with a focus on writing, listening, speaking, viewing, and representing visually. Examine printed and technology-based text, including children's and young adult literature (fiction, poetry, and nonfiction), written by and about people from diverse backgrounds. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisite: EDU330.

EDR318 - Fundamentals of Reading Curriculum and Instruction (3 cr.)

Theories of reading development, individual differences, the nature of reading and causes of reading difficulties, and principles of assessment. Curriculum and instruction in reading skills and strategies in the areas of word identification and vocabulary, comprehension, and study strategies. Principles of and methods for assessment of student performance and progress in reading and for using assessment information to plan reading programs. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisites: EDU330, EDR315.

EDR360 - Using children's Literature and Trade Books in the Classroom (3 cr.)

A study of the use of children's literature and trade books in the classroom. Development and application of criteria used in selecting books for a variety of uses (read aloud, content areas instruction, shared reading). An exploration of the interrelationship of children's needs, interests, cultural backgrounds, attitudes, and reading behaviors. (Fall/Winter/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: matriculation into BS/MSED in early childhood education, childhood education/literacy education (birth to grade 6) combined program and EDU240.

EDR364 - Reading in the Secondary School (3 cr.)

This course leads secondary teachers to develop a concept of reading as an active, meaning-seeking process and a workable, fundamental part of content area learning. Preservice teachers use knowledge of reading processes to plan instruction in the classroom, learn strategies for organizing and evaluating reading material, learn strategies for facilitating reading comprehension and concept development through specific text materials, and learn research-based, practical strategies for helping pupils develop confidence, awareness, and control in applying themselves independently to the demands of reading tasks in all content areas. Included within the course is a ten-hour reading tutorial which provides preservice teachers experience working one-one-one with a secondary pupil. (Fall - Spring). Corequisites: EDU372, EDU395.

EDR399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDR401 - Study in Literacy Instruction (3 cr.)

Analysis and exploration of topics including: theories, process, and models of reading and writing; emergent literacy; knowledge of language, graphophonic system, metacognition, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension; formal and informal assessment. Focus on multiple, integrated, relevant, problem-solving instructional strategies adapted to the specific needs and interests of individuals as they develop their literacy skills in a wide range of grade levels. (Fall). Prerequisites: matriculation into BS/MSED in early childhood education, childhood education/literacy education (birth to grade 6) combined program and EDU335.

EDR499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

EDR500 - Intensive Professional Development in Literacy Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (1 cr.)

Designing and facilitating professional development activities related to various topics in literacy. (Spring). Prerequisites: matriculation in M.S.Ed. Literacy program; EDR507 or EDU513 or EDR522.

EDR501 - Introduction to Literacy Instruction (3 cr.)

Analysis and exploration of topics including: theories, process, and models of reading and writing; emergent literacy; knowledge of language, graphophonic system, metacognition, vocabulary, fluency, and comprehension; formal and informal assessment. Focus on multiple, integrated, relevant, problem-solving instructional strategies adapted to the specific needs and interests of individuals as they develop their literacy skills in a wide range of grade levels. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: education majors.

EDR502 - Current Trends in Reading (3 cr.)

Current theory, practice and emerging research. Variable topics reflecting current issues in the field of reading education. (Spring, Fall, Summer).

EDR504 - Writing and the Teaching of Writing (3 cr.)

Students will experience and analyze writing as a process and the teaching of writing as a process with attention to: writing as a craft; organizing students for engaging in writing workshop (whole class, small group, one-to-one instruction); the connections between reading and writing; writing across content areas; writing across genres; various ways to assess writing to inform instruction. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDR507 - Research Methods in Literacy Education (3 cr.)

A conceptual framework for educators in their roles as producers and consumers of research. The basic concepts and principles important to understanding research, especially in literacy education, will be introduced. The focus will be on sensitizing educators to caveats and ethical issues by developing abilities to frame, analyze, evaluate, and critique research. The participants will learn about the real world of research by designing a research study and will be introduced to the two fundamental research paradigms: quantitative and qualitative. (Summer, Fall). Prerequisite(s): enrollment in the M.S.Ed. Literacy Program or POI.

EDR509 - Assessment of Reading & Writing Skills & Strategies (2 cr.)

Theories and models of literacy assessment, both formal and informal, will be presented to candidates with an emphasis on putting theoretical models into practice in authentic settings. Assessment of reading and writing skills and strategies will provide the framework needed for candidates to both administer assessments and then use the information gleaned from the data to provide appropriate instruction for P-12 students. (Spring). Corequisite: EDR511 or EDR512. Prerequisites: matriculation in an M.S.Ed. Literacy program; EDR504, EDR513, EDR522.

EDR511 - Literacy Education Birth-Grade 6 (3 cr.)

In this course, candidates develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of literacy and concepts of reading and writing as active, meaning-seeking processes. Study of theories of literacy development, scope and sequence of skills, individual differences, the relationship of language and cognitive development to literacy development, motivation and other factors that affect literacy behaviors from Birth-Grade 6. Exploration of high-quality, research-based literacy programs, including literature-based curriculum and instruction and pragmatic experiences converting theory to practice. Includes 10 hours of supervised practica with students PreK-Grade 6. (Spring). Corequisite: EDR509. Prerequisites: matriculation in M.S.Ed. Literacy Birth-Grade 6 program; EDR504, EDR513, EDR522.

EDR512 - Literacy Education Grades 5-12 (3 cr.)

In this course, candidates develop an understanding of fundamental aspects of literacy and concepts of reading and writing as active, meaning-seeking processes. Study of theories of literacy development, scope and sequence of skills, individual differences, the relationship of language and cognitive development to literacy development, motivation and other factors that affect literacy behaviors in Grades 5-12. Exploration of high-quality, research-based literacy programs, including literature-based curriculum and instruction and pragmatic experiences converting theory to practice. Includes 10 hours of supervised practica with students in Grades 5-12. (Spring). Corequisite: EDR509. Prerequisite(s): matriculation in M.S.Ed. Literacy Grades 5-12 program; EDR504, EDR513, EDR522.

EDR513 - Literacy for Democratic and Global Societies (3 cr.)

Students will rethink the traditional definition of literacy as "reading and writing" and consider how 21st century definitions of literacy are tied to social, political, and cultural processes of globalization. They will investigate how communicating in a diverse democratic society, engaging in social practices, living in relationship with each other, and contributing to justice and democracy leads to a thoughtful, committed, and active citizenry. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: matriculation in an M.S.Ed. program or EDR501 or equivalent.

EDR514 - Developing Multicultural Competencies: Literacy for Social Justice (3 cr.)

Affirm, respect, and value cultural, linguistic, and ethnic diversity through the development of multicultural competencies. Respond to increasing diversity in classrooms through conscious awareness and use of multiple, integrated, practical, and creative problem-solving strategies adapted to the specific needs and interests of children in all areas of literacy. Explore literature that reflects diversity and issues of social justice. Study systems of dominance and marginalization with specific attention to the role of literacy within such systems. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: matriculation in B.A./M.S.T. Adolescence Ed., B.S./M.S.Ed. Childhood/Special Ed., M.S.T., or M.S.Ed. program AND one of the following: EDR501 or EDR513 or EDR524.

EDR515 - Advanced Studies in Children's Literature (3 cr.)

Immersion into the world of children's literature: fiction and non-fiction in a variety of genres and formats. Reader response and transactional theories, rationale and methodologies for integrating children's literature throughout the curriculum. Genre, author and thematic approaches. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer).

EDR516 - Reading, Literature and the Young Adult (3 cr.)

Rationale and methodologies for integrating young adult literature throughout the curriculum. Genre, author, and thematic approaches. Analysis of pertinent scholarly and controversial issues. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDR519 - Curriculum and Instruction for Birth-Grade2: Foundations in Language Development and Literacy (3 cr.)

Language and literacy for the early childhood period; Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP) as it applies to language and literacy acquisition; aspects of emergent literacy, naturalistic literacy environments, quality children's literature, and curricular and instructional approaches and programs appropriate for language and literacy development in the early childhood settings. (Spring). Prerequisites: EDU5205; matriculation into C&I program or Certificate program in Early Childhood Education Birth - Grade 2.

EDR522 - Advanced Literacy Instruction for All Learners (3 cr.)

Students will extend and deepen their thinking of literacy and literacy instruction. Students will study issues and trends in literacy development, approaches and strategies of literacy instruction, assessment, and social-cultural factors that affect literacy behaviors from Birth-Grade 6. This course includes a ten-hour supervised practicum at either Birth-Grade 6 or Grades 5-12. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: matriculation in an M.S.Ed. program or EDR501 or equivalent introductory literacy course.

EDR524 - Literacy Instruction in the Content Areas in Grades 7-12 (3 cr.)

Examination of the relationships between general reading and language arts skills and strategies and the unique and specialized literacy skills and strategies needed for efficient and effective reading in content areas. Exploration of methods for differentiating the instructional program to foster continuing literacy development as learners advance through grades 7-12. Analyze curriculum and instructional approaches in literacy that foster the integration of literacy in the content disciplines (social studies, math, science, English, foreign language, technology, and the visual and performing arts). (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDR527 - Becoming a Literacy Leader (3 cr.)

Students will study, analyze and have opportunities to experience literacy leadership with attention to teaching, professional development, on-going learning, and coaching. (Spring). Prerequisites: matriculation in M.S. Ed. Literacy; EDR504, EDR513 and EDR522.

EDR540 - Theory into Practice: Reading Instruction (3 cr.)

An in-depth study of theoretical models of reading and literacy and the processes of reading. An investigation of the application of models and related instructional practices in the areas of language, literacy development, social context/culture, reading acquisition, comprehension, metacognition, and response theory. (Winter & Summer). Prerequisite: EDR 501.

EDR543 - Philosophy and Children's Literature (3 cr.)

This course is based on the premise that children's natural tendency to philosophize about words, reality, and morality requires careful nurturing if it is to develop into critical reflection: such nurturing devolves to the teacher, not merely as transmitter of information, but as a practitioner in dialogical thinking. As a learning community, we will critically examine the link between philosophical ideas and inquiry and practice in education. A variety of children's literature and children's media will be explored in order to focus on the salient contribution that philosophy makes to literacy and the role literature and media can play in nurturing children's development in becoming philosophers and theory makers. The tools of conceptual analysis and critical thinking will be applied to an evolving clarification of the meaning of texts and the enhancement of academic discussion. (Fall/Spring).

EDR560 - Clinical Experience in Literacy Instruction (6 cr.)

Coursework will focus on the influences of motivation and prior knowledge, phonological awareness, word recognition, vocabulary, comprehension, fluency, metacognition, writing, spelling, and reading to learn. During the 30-hour tutorial, candidates will work with one or more students at the Birth-Grade 6 or Grades 5-12 level. Candidates will establish rapport, gain knowledge of students' literacy interests, and use informal reading inventories and/or an array of emergent literacy, phonological awareness, and phonics assessments. Candidates will interpret the results of all assessments and create, implement, monitor, evaluate, and modify individualized instructional plans based on the student's specific strengths, needs, and progress in literacy. Candidates will compose detailed reports and will confer with children and parents/guardians in order to facilitate continued support and progress. (Summer). Prerequisites: matriculation in an M.S.Ed. Literacy program; completion of at least 27 hours of coursework toward that degree, AND EDR509, EDR527; and either EDR511 or EDR512.

EDR564 - Creative Responses to Children's and Young Adult Literature (3 cr.)

Study and application of creative response as a means to value and dignify individual expression, to motivate through intrinsic satisfaction, and to demonstrate comprehension and appreciation of children's and young adult literature. Examines aspects of the creative process, strategies and models for engaging students actively in literary experiences, and authentic assessment of creative response. Explores the use of literature as a means to promote critical, evaluative, and creative thinking, problem solving, self-discovery, and multicultural and multiethnic awareness. (Summer).

EDR570 - Literacy Education and Technology (3 cr.)

Examination of the role of technology in literacy education. Focuses on digital innovations and uses of media in literacy to enhance teaching and learning. Considers instructional applications within eduational settings, evaluative criteria for technological resources, applicable media creation, and current literature in the field. (Summer & Fall).

EDR585 - Practitioner Research (2 cr.)

Students will investigate educational practice by designing and conducting original research in education. This course will emphasize the approaches used in practitioner and action research. An informal report of the progress of the research will be presented as a preparation for sharing meaningful information with a broader audience in the future. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: matriculation in an M.S.Ed. program.

EDR598 - Reading Internship (3 cr.)

Advanced field work under professional supervision. Prepares the student for a leadership role in the area of Reading Education. Students work in an approved school, by invitation only, under the supervision of a practicing reading professional and Plattsburgh State reading faculty sponsor. Responsibilities vary by position but entail daily attendance and close collaboration with a reading teacher in the assessment and tutoring of children in reading participation in conferences and meetings, lesson planning and implementation. (Summer). Prerequisites: EDR560, POI.

EDS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDS201 - Infants and Young Children with Exceptional Needs (3 cr.)

Exploration of practices and policies appropriate to the needs of infants and preschool children who are disabled and/or at risk. The philosophy of early intervention, federal legislation related to early intervention, intervention strategies, service delivery approaches, development of children from birth-age 5, and awareness of the range of available Assistive Technology (AT) options and applications for young children with disabilities. The importance of the family structure and the cultural, linguistic, and social differences that affect the lives of young children. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: B.S./M.S.Ed major.

EDS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDS405 - Literacy for Students with Exceptional Learning Needs (3 cr.)

Aspects of the development of listening, speaking, reading, writing, listening, and viewing and representing visually (media literacy), focusing on diverse learners, students who are at-risk, struggling, or identified as having Exceptional Learning Needs (ELN). Exploration of research-based best practices, assessment, Response to Intervention, materials, and techniques to promote literacy development of students who are at-risk, struggling, or who have ELN. Examination of differentiation of curriculum and instruction in the Language Arts, with a focus on reading. Emphasis on multiple approaches: multi-sensory, phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and reading as a lifelong pursuit. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: EDS201.

EDS410 - Foundations of Special Education (3 cr.)

This course provides a foundational understanding of the field of special education. The course will examine the characteristics and abilities of students with exceptional learning needs. Teacher candidates will learn to plan and implement differentiated instructional and assessment stategies to engage all students in meaningful learning activities. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: enrolled in undergraduate Childhood Education Program and EDR315, EDU371.

EDS424 - Autism Spectrum Disorders (3 cr.)

Descriptions, definitions, and methods of identifying Autism Spectrum Disorder. The symptoms and assessment instruments or techniques available to alert parents and providers to seek further evaluation by a child study team of the local school district and a developmental pediatrician. Local, state, and national resources for parents and professional. Current research and debate associated with the perceived causes of the disorders. Learning to work with students on the spectrum through teaching strategies and techniques. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDS429 - Family and Interdisciplinary Collaboration (3 cr.)

Provides candidates with theory, general principles, and procedures for fostering collaborative partnerships among teachers, families, professionals, students, and other stakeholders that lead to outcomes of individual and mutual empowerment. (Spring, Fall). Corequisite: EDS483. Prerequisite: EDS410.

EDS461 - Applied Behavior Management (3 cr.)

Study of management of problem behavior in the classroom. Effects of teacher behavior and teacher attitudes on handicapped students' behavior. Control techniques, case analysis, behavior modification and interviewing techniques. (Fall - Spring). Corequisites: EDS481, EDS482 Prerequisite: EDS410.

EDS481 - Assessment in Special Education (3 cr.)

Administration, scoring and interpretation of standardized educational assessment instruments. Use of assessment data to identify and place students with disabilities, and to develop Individualized Education Programs. (Fall - Spring & Summer). Corequisites: EDS461, EDS482. Prerequisite: EDS410 or equivalent.

EDS482 - Curricular Practices in Special Education (6 cr.)

Competencies in curricular programming for the learners with mild/moderate disabilities in the development, implementation and evaluation of instructional plans. The use of specific techniques and commercial programs as these apply to self-contained, resource and consultative teaching programs at both elementary and secondary levels. (Fall - Spring). Corequisites: EDS461, EDS481 Prerequisite: EDS410.

EDS483 - Special Education Practicum (6 cr.)

Teaching practicum stressing assessing learner instructional needs, designing, delivering, and evaluating instruction for learners with disabilities in school environments. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: EDS461, EDS481, EDS482.

EDS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer, Winter & Fall).

EDS505 - Literacy for Students with Exceptional Learning Needs (3 cr.)

Aspects of the development of listening, speaking, reading, writing, listening, and viewing and representing visually (media literacy), focusing on diverse learners, students who are at-risk, struggling, or identified as having Exceptional Learning Needs (ELN). Exploration of research-based best practices, assessment, Response to Intervention, materials, and techniques to promote literacy development of students who are at-risk, struggling, or who have ELN. Examination of differentiation of curriculum and instruction in the Language Arts, with a focus on reading. Emphasis on multiple approaches; multi-sensory, phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and reading as a lifelong pursuit. (Fall/Spring).

EDS506 - Assessment, Evaluation, and Learning (3 cr.)

Candidates will learn to select and implement informal and formal assessment tools, strategies, and procedures for students who are at risk or struggling with content, processes, or products. Candidates will learn to select and implement informal and formal assessment tools, strategies, and procedures. Candidates will study how to interpret and use assessment results to make data-based decisions regarding student performance, instruction, curriculum modifications, and placement. Candidates will also learn effective approaches for communicating assessment results to parents, other professionals and specialists, paraprofessionals, and school administrators. (Fall/Spring).

EDS507 - Prosocial Skills, Positive Behavior Supports B-12 (3 cr.)

Study of techniques to change challenging classroom behaviors both in the academic and social areas. Assessment and analysis of a Functional Behavior Assessment (FBA) and the development of a Behavior Improvement Plan (BIP) which includes the identification of antecedent and consequent events. Understand why challenging behavior may occur and long-term strategies to reduce and teach positive alternatives. Provide contextual supports necessary for successful outcomes. Proactive and reactive strategies appropriate for Birth-12. Strengthening the foundation of Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP), behavior in school and other settings will be developed. (Fall/Spring).

EDS508 - Practicum in Special Education Birth to Grade 2 (6 cr.)

Practicum stresses assessing children's instructional needs; candidates will focus on developing and delivering appropriate lesson plans; designing curriculum; delivering and evaluating instruction for learners with disabilities in school environments. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: BS/MSEd major.

EDS510 - Foundations of Special Education (3 cr.)

This course provides a foundational understanding of the field of special education. The course will examine the characteristics and abilities of students with exceptional learning needs. Teacher candidates will learn to plan and implement differentiated instructional and assessment strategies to engage all students in meaningful learning activities. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDS511 - Young Children with Exceptional Learning Needs (3 cr.)

An in-depth look at the philosophy, intervention strategies, service delivery approaches, and professional development for early intervention, preschool and primary grades. Practices and policies appropriate to the needs of infant, preschool children and primary grades with disabilities and/or "at risk" are addressed. (Fall/Spring).

EDS512 - Special Education Capstone (0 cr.)

Members of the special education program faculty strive to make a connective link across the disciplines, place specialties in a larger context, and highlight the student's scholastic efforts in a revealing and meaningful way. The capstone project will provide students with the opportunities to examine the Council for Exceptional Children Advanced Professional Standards and the Teacher Education Unit Claims and connect them to their courses and their practice. (Fall/Spring).

EDS520 - Specific Learning Disabilities/School and Society (3 cr.)

Exploration of the complexities of the field of learning disabilities; study of the sociological, psychological, educational, vocational, familial, and societal aspects of this exceptional condition; study of the precursors of specific learning disabilities and clinical teaching practices. (Spring & Fall).

EDS521 - Intellectual and Low-Incidence Disabilities (3 cr.)

Introduction to the history, philosophy, causation, and service delivery models related to the education/habilitation of individuals with developmental and low-incidence disabilities. This includes intellectual disabilities, blindness, deafness, deaf-blindness, and multiple disabilities. Legal issues, ethical practices, and rights of individuals with disabilities will be examined. (Fall/Spring).

EDS522 - Emotional and Behavior Disorders in School and Society (3 cr.)

Historical, etiological, societal, and psychological nature of behavior disorders, current therapeutic, and educational interventions. Emphasis on multidisciplinary approaches. Problems in the analysis, interpretation, and treatment of disordered behavior will be evaluated. (Fall/Spring).

EDS523 - Advocacy and School Law in Special Education (3 cr.)

An in-depth examination of litigation and educational law (state and federal) that pertain to persons with disabilities. Introduction to the philosophical and historical legacy of advocacy for and by persons with disabilities. Development of skills and techniques required to become an educational advocate for infants, children, and young adults. Topics of discussion focus on defining disabilities, group process, communication skills, and assertiveness. (Spring).

EDS524 - Autism Spectrum Disorder (3 cr.)

Descriptions, definitions, and methods of identifying Autism Spectrum Disorder. The symptoms and assessment instruments or techniques available to alert parents and providers to seek further evaluation by a child study team of the local school district and a developmental pediatrician. Local, state, and national resources for parents and professionals. Current research and debate associated with the perceived causes of the disorders. Learning to work with students on the spectrum through teaching strategies and techniques. (Fall).

EDS525 - Adaptive Technology (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide special education teacher candidates with an introduction to and overview of Assistive Technology (AT) and its application within the context of early intervention and early childhood education programs for children with disabilities. Teacher candidates will have an opportunity to engage in authentic learning experiences related to the assessment, consideration, selection, and use of AT in areas of play, positioning, mobility, communication, learning, and activities of daily living. (Summer).

EDS529 - Family and Interdisciplinary Collaboration (3 cr.)

Provides students with theory, general principles and procedures for fostering collaborative partnerships among teachers, families, professionals, students and other stakeholders that lead to outcomes of individual and mutual empowerment. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: EDS510.

EDS531 - Action Research for Teacher-Researchers (3 cr.)

A conceptual framework for educators in their roles as producers and consumers of research. The basic concepts and principles important to planning and implementing action research are explored with emphasis on how educators conduct research in settings where they work as practitioners. The focus will be on sensitizing educators to caveats and ethical issues by developing abilities to frame, analyze, evaluate, and critique research. (Fall/Spring).

EDS532 - Assessment in Special Education (3 cr.)

Competencies in the basic measurement concepts associated with educational assessment, the administration and scoring of specific norm-referenced instruments for the comprehensive assessment, development and use of authentic assessment; interpretation and utilization of assessment data to guide the process of identifying, classifying, and planning educational interventions for persons with disabilities. Understanding the legal perspectives related to assessment. Understand of the assessor's code of ethics. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDS533 - Assessment for Infants and Young Children (3 cr.)

Application of assessment procedures with infants and young children who are at risk for or have developmental disabilities. Administration, scoring, interpretation of norm-referenced instruments across a broad spectrum of developmental (e.g. cognitive, language, motor) skills; use of authentic assessment tools and observation skills; the organization, preparation, and presentation of diagnostic data including educational recommendations. (Spring & Summer). Pre-requisite: EDS530 or equivalent and EDS532 or equivalent.

EDS535 - Theories of Behavior Management (3 cr.)

Theories of behavior change for persons with disabilities. Study of management of problem behavior in the classroom. Effects of teacher behavior and attitudes on students with disabilities behavior. Management strategies, case analysis, behavior modification, and observation techniques will be discussed. Skills necessary for assessing and applying the development of internal locus of control, self-reinforcement impulse control, and adaptive behavior in school and other settings will be developed. (Spring & Fall).

EDS536 - Instructional Practices for Students with Disabilities Birth-Grade 2 (3 cr.)

Acquisition of knowledge and skills in curricular and instructional programming for children birth to Grade 2 who have been identified as having, or at risk of developing, developmental disabilities or other disabilities. The use of specific instructional techniques and practices as they apply to pre-elementary school levels or early elementary grades to facilitate success in elementary schools. (Summer).

EDS537 - Instructional Practices for Students with Disabilities Grades 1-6 (3 cr.)

Instructional and curricular programming for school-age children with mild and moderate disabilities, development of individual programs of instruction, instructional objectives, lesson planning and instructional design, curriculum-based assessment and instruction, data-based decision making, application of research-based teaching strategies. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDS539 - Instructional Practices: Grades 7-12 (6 cr.)

Curricular and instructional programming for learners with mild to moderate disabilities in grades 7-12. Development, implementation and evaluation of instructional objectives and teaching plans. Application of criterion-based instructional procedures. Analysis of factors and conditions that facilitate learning. Use of specific instructional techniques and strategies as they apply to content areas and placement options in grades 7-12. (Fall).

EDS541 - Teaching Prosocial Skills to Young Children (3 cr.)

Teaching young children prosocial skills who are at-risk or manifest disabilities. Methods for increasing appropriate interactions with peers and adults. Both proactive and reactive strategies appropriate for young children will be studied. Examination of various models of social skills instruction. Techniques for assessing prosocial skills and applying instruction. The development of internal locus of control, impulse control, and adaptive behavior in preschool and other settings. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: EDS511.

EDS543 - Inclusion and Collaboration (3 cr.)

Educational professionals will learn philosophies, strategies, and approaches related to inclusion and collaboration versus mainstreaming, integration and consultation. Students will learn how to plan and implement instructional practices appropriate for all students in an inclusive school community. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer).

EDT494 - Student Teaching (12 to 15 cr.)

Teacher candidates will demonstrate competency in knowledge of content, pedagogy and professional skills by performing all responsibilities expected of an education professional. Issues of personal growth and concerns related to education, democracy in education, multicultural competencies, technology, literacy and effective instruction for all students, families, schools, communities will be discussed in a professional seminar. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: EDU465 and EDU475; major in B.S. Childhood Education or combined B.S./M.S.Ed.

EDT495 - Student Teaching: Elementary School for Special Education Candidates (7 cr.)

Culmination of observation and participation experience. Increasing responsibility for guiding learners. Participation in all phases of a teacher's work. Prerequisites: 1) completion of a minimum of 87 credit (senior) with a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. 2) minimum grade of C in ENG101. 3) completion of all required professional education courses through the semester preceding the Senior Field Experience, with no grade below a C. 4) completion of at least 18 hours of work in academic specialization by the semester preceding the Senior Field Experience. Prior to the Senior Field Experience all special education candidates must have a cumulative GPA in all the courses that apply to their concentration of at least a 2.5. 5) completion of EDU357 with a minimum grade of C. (Spring & Fall).

EDT497 - Student Teaching in Special Education (8 cr.)

Culmination of observation and participation experience. Increasing responsibility for exceptional learners. Participation in all phases of a teacher's work. Prerequisites: 1) completion of a minimum of 87 credits (senior) with a minimum cumulative 2.5 GPA; 2) minimum grade of C in ENG101; 3) completion of all required professional education courses through the semester preceding the Senior Field Experience, with no grade below a C; 4) completion of at least 18 hours of work in academic specialization by the semester preceding the Senior Field Experience with a GPA of at least a 2.5 for elementary, secondary and speech & hearing majors in the area of concentration. (Secondary majors must also receive the recommendation of the faculty of the academic specialization); 5) completion of EDU357 with a minimum grade of C. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: see course description.

EDT593 - Student Teaching in Teaching and Learning, Early Childhood (2 cr.)

This 20-day (minimum) student teaching experience provides a carefully mentored experience that enhances the knowledge, skills, and dispositions necessary to positively impact learning and development of children from Birth-Grade 2. In student teaching, candidates will demonstrate instruction skills and abilities by teaching individuals and small groups in developmentally appropriate settings. The candidate will plan, implement, and assess the results of learning. The candidate will also participate in other duties that are typically performed by teachers in settings serving children in the early childhood period. (As Needed). Prerequisites: must have completed all coursework in the program.

EDT594 - Student Teaching (12 cr.)

Student teaching; culmination of observation and participation experiences of the program. Increased responsibility for guiding a group of learners over a period of consecutive weeks. Responsible participation in all phases of a teacher's work. Prerequisites: 1) MST childhood candidates: completion of the following courses with no grade below B: EDU505, EDU580, EDU506, EDR501, EDR514, EDM506, EDU530, EDU571, and three additional courses, one from each of the following categories: select one lesson design course: EDU578, EDU521, or EDU508; select one special education course: EDS543 or EDS510; select one classroom management course: EDU537 or EDU538. 2) For MST adolescence candidates, completion of the following courses with no grade below B: EDU507, EDU580, EDU506, EDR514, EDR524, EDU512, and four additional courses, one from each of the following categories: select one lesson design course: EDU578, EDU521, EDU509; select one special education course: EDS543 or EDS510; select one classroom management course: EDU537 or EDU538; select one research course: EDU513, EDS531, EDR507. 3) HED310 or equivalent with a minimum grade of B; must include NYS mandated training in recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect, substance abuse awareness, and school violence prevention. (Spring, & Fall).

EDT595 - Student Teaching in Childhood Education Grades 1-6 (6 cr.)

In this field experience, candidates will demonstrate instruction skills and abilities by teaching individuals and groups. The candidate will plan, implement, and assess the results of instruction delivered in an educational setting appropriate for students. The candidate will also participate in other duties that are typically performed by teachers in grades 1-6 educational settings. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: students are required to be within six credit hours of program completion.

EDT596 - Student Teaching: Special Education Grades 1-6 (6 cr.)

In this field experience, Special Education candidates will demonstrate instruction skills and abilities by teaching individuals and groups. The candidate will plan, implement, and assess the results of instruction delivered in an educational setting appropriate for students with identified disabilities. The candidate will also participate in other duties that are typically performed by teachers in grades 1-6 educational settings. (Fall/Spring).

EDT597 - Student Teaching in Special Education Birth - Grade 2 (6 cr.)

In this field experience, Special Education candidates will demonstrate instruction skills and abilities by teaching individuals and groups. The candidate will plan, implement, and assess the results of instruction delivered in an educational setting appropriate for students with identified disabilities. The candidate will also participate in other duties that are typically performed by teachers in Birth-Grade 2 educational settings. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: EDS536.

EDT598 - Student Teaching Sp Ed 7-12 (6 cr.)

In this field experience, Special Education candidates will demonstrate instruction skills and abilities by teaching individuals and groups. The candidate will plan, implement, and assess the results of instruction delivered in educational setting appropriate for students with identified disabilities. The candidate will also participate in other duties that are typically performed by teachers in grades 7-12 educational settings. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: EDS539.

EDU118 - Human Growth and Development (3 cr.)

A study of cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development across the lifespan. Factors affecting development and learning will be investigated, such as cultural and family variables. Major theoretical perspectives will serve as frameworks for developing links between theory and experience. (Fall/Spring) Corequisite: EDU120. Prerequisite: major in B.S. Childhood Education or Combined B.S./M.S.Ed.

EDU120 - Exploring Teaching, Learning, and Human Development (3 cr.)

A study of cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development in school and community settings. Teacher candidates will investigate the cultural and family variables which affect teaching, learning, and human development. (Minimum of 10 hours of field experience). (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: EDU118. Prerequisite: major in B.S. Childhood Education or Combined B.S./M.S.Ed.

EDU130 - Ethics, Relationships, and Multicultural Competencies in Education (3 cr.)

Investigating, thinking critically, and reflecting on ethics, relationships, and multicultural competencies in education. Exploration of the ethical and practical dimensions of teaching within the diverse contexts which teachers and their students bring to the classroom community. Students will be expected to develop an understanding of multicultural teaching competencies and engage in self-reflection to identify and monitor their strengths and areas in need of improvement. Field-based component includes series of conversations with allied professionals (e.g., reading specialists/literacy coaches, speech-language pathologists, school counselors, school psychologists) as well as a series of immersion experience. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: Major in B.S. Childhood Education or Combined B.S./M.S.Ed.; EDU118 and EDU120.

EDU199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDU230 - Social Contexts in Learning (3 cr.)

Teacher candidates will analyze social contexts and their implications for learning. They will explore schools as societal institutions to identity aspects which perpetuate a system of dominance and oppression. In addition, teacher candidates will examine the classroom as a learning community for all students - including managing for student learning, language acquisition, literacy development, inclusion and use of technology. (Minimum of 10 hours of field experience. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU130 or equivalent; major in Childhood Education B.S. or Combined BS or Combined BS/MSEd.

EDU240 - Introduction to Instructional Planning (3 cr.)

Introduction to curriculum design, lesson design, instructional planning, technology integration, differentiation, assessment, classroom management, development of positive learning environments. Minimum of 10 hours of field experience. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU230 or equivalent; major in Childhood Education BS or Combined BS/MSEd.

EDU280 - Introduction to Adolescence Education (6 cr.)

The course introduces adolescence education to future adolescence teacher candidates by exploring the multiple political, social, historical, and philosophical contexts within which American adolescence schooling operates. Students develop their critical thinking skills in social and psychological foundations by identifying these multiple contexts and by assessing the degree to which they could and should affect teaching and learning. Students develop their thinking in class and field work in order to find and refine their professional skills and perspective. (Fall/Spring). Co-requisite: The allied introductory course in the student's content major. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing in one of the combined BA/MST Adolescence programs.

EDU299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

EDU325 - Teaching Methods I: Connecting Pedagogy in Reading and Writing, Content Areas and Special Education (7 cr.)

Candidates will build a foundation for best practices in teaching and learning through the connection of theories and practices, planning, content integration, and multicultural competencies. This course offers an introduction to pedagogy in reading and writing, special education and technology. Minimum of 25 hours of field experience. EDU325, EDU335, and EDU465 fulfill the college Advanced Writing Requirement (AWR). (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU240 or equivalent; major in Childhood Education BS or Combined BS/MSEd.

EDU330 - Exploring Educational Issues Through Writing (3 cr.)

Uses analysis of educational theory, scholarly articles, and other types of writing in the discipline to make explicit various rhetorical expectations for writing in the field. Emphasizes writing to learn, celebrates writing across the disciplines and helps students improve their prose through analysis, peer editing, and myriad writing exercises. Approved AWR. (Winter, Spring, Summer & Fall). Prerequisites: ENG101 with a grade of C or higher; second semester sophomore standing; liberal arts GPA of 2.5 or better.

EDU331 - Exploring Educational Issues Through Writing Lab (1 cr.)

One-credit laboratory to provide developmental instruction in basic composition skills, process, grammar, and critical thinking skills while acting as a general support for those studying educational theory and research in EDU330 Exploring Educational Issues Through Writing. (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall). Corequisite: EDU330. Prerequisites: POI and ENG101.

EDU335 - Teaching Methods II: Connecting Pedagogy in Reading and Writing, Content Areas, and Special Ed (7 cr.)

Teacher candidates will deepen their understandings of pedagogy, methods, best practices and integrated literacy and how to assess students' learning in social studies, science, math, creative arts, and English language arts. An integrated planning model will be introduced and used in writing lessons, developing units, and creating projects across curricular areas including the arts. Candidates will engage in a variety of professional writing experiences (e.g., planning and organization, reflection, describing and analyzing student learning, narrative writing, critique of current practices - content standards, instructional practices, and instructional design). Minimum of 25 hours of field experience. EDU325, EDU335, and EDU465 fulfill the college Advanced Writing Requirement (AWR). Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU325; major in Childhood Education BS or Combined BS/MSEd.

EDU357 - Use of Media in Education (1 cr.)

Instructional media basic competency: hardware and software proficiency; technology classroom management techniques; use of the Internet in the classroom; software and website evaluation; review of educational technology literature; and technology-integrated lesson planning. (Fall, Spring & Summer).

EDU371 - Psychological Foundations of Elementary Education (6 cr.)

This course is the study of the nature of children from birth through early adolescence, including cognitive, social, emotional, moral, and physical development. Candidates explore group and individual differences, paying close attention to diversity for teachers and learners. Topics include the interconnection that exists in the teaching-learning process from various theoretical perspectives. The relationship between theory and practice is explored during a field experience. (Fall - Spring). Corequisite: EDR315. Prerequisites: EDU 330.

EDU372 - Foundations of Secondary Education (6 cr.)

The course is about the multiple political, social, historical, and philosophical contexts within which American schooling operates. Students develop their critical thinking skills in social and psychological foundations by identifying these multiple contexts and by assessing the degree to which they could and should affect teaching and learning. Students develop their thinking in order to found and refine their professional perspective. (Spring & Fall). Corequisites: EDR364, EDU395, EDU359, EDU420. Prerequisites: junior standing and completion of all other educational requirements leading to the professional semester.

EDU380 - Topics: Social Foundations of Education (1 to 3 cr.)

Social Foundations explores current and enduring educational issues from a social foundations perspective; provides an analysis and interpretation of schooling in a cultural, historical, political, socio-economic and philosophical context. Educational issues related to racial, ethnic, gender, ability, and status are examined as we aim for equality in contemporary societies. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Corequisite: EDU330.

EDU391 - Science for the Elementary School Teacher (3 cr.)

This course uses the National Science Education Standards as a foundation for the study and implementation of science lessons across the curriculum and within the realms of all science. The approach is largely inquiry and activity based with emphasis on developing the students' ability to articulate science content and process and the nature of science as a dynamic study. (Spring, Summer, & Fall). Corequisite (Recommended): Elementary education majors should take this course with EDU394; special/elementary education majors should take this course with EDS378. Prerequisites: Acceptance in the Childhood Education Program, EDU330.

EDU394 - Block II - Elementary Curriculum and Instruction (6 cr.)

Students continue to develop their knowledge base and skills for teaching and assessment with an emphasis on practice in the field. Students examine concepts and procedures of student learning, trends in elementary education, and NYS Learning Standards. Pragmatic experience is provided in the planning for and implementation of instruction in the elementary classroom as well as a corresponding assessment of student learning. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: EDR315, EDU371.

EDU395 - Block II - Secondary Curriculum and Instruction (6 cr.)

Intensive training in the planning/implementation of instruction at the middle/high school levels. Development of productive learning environments. Integration of language and problem-solving skills into content area instruction. Assessment and evaluation of student needs and progress. Teacher communication and interpersonal skills. Classroom participation in the field. (Spring & Fall). Corequisites: EDU359, EDU364, EDU372, EDU420. Prerequisites: EDU330, EDU357, HED310.

EDU399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Summer).

EDU423 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Literacy for Birth-Grade 2 (4 cr.)

Aspects of development of children from birth to age 8 in all of the critical domains. Planning, implementing, and evaluating curriculum, instruction, and literacy experiences for children from birth to age 8, including those with exceptional needs. Includes a 25 hour supervised field experience with young children. (Winter/Summer). Prerequisites: matriculation into B.S./M.S.Ed in Early Childhood Education, Childhood Education/Literacy (Birth to Grade 6) combined program and EDU230.

EDU432 - Teaching Social Studies K-9 (3 cr.)

Explores theories, practices and issues in social studies education. Relates analysis of information, professional standards and learning processes to planning and teaching effective curriculum for diverse learners. Emphasizes critical reading and inquiry strategies relevant to interdisciplinary studies. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: EDU371 for Childhood Education Majors; EDU330 for Special Education Majors; or POI.

EDU465 - Curriculum Design: Implementation of Integrated Inst Planning, Assmnt of Stdnt Lrng, & Organization (7 cr.)

Teacher candidates will review, design, and implement curriculum in reading and writing, science, social studies, math, and the creative arts. Candidates will plan and organize instruction and describe and analyze student learning across curricular areas, and critique current practices. Candidates will engage in professional discourse and reflect upon their practices and make necessary changes to meet student learning needs. Minimum of 25 hours of field experience. EDU325, EDU335, and EDU465 fulfill the college Advanced Writing Requirement (AWR). Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: EDU475. Prerequisites: EDU335; major in Childhood Education BS or Combined BS/MSEd.

EDU475 - Practitioner Research in the Classroom (2 cr.)

Introduction to research and its role in informing best practices in teaching. Candidates will explore scientific method, research approaches, and research designs and will learn how to read research critically. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: EDU465. Prerequisites: EDU335; major in Childhood Education BS or Combined BS/MSEd.

EDU498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

(Fall).

EDU499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU500 - Education in Contemporary Society (3 cr.)

Philosophical, social, psychological and political perspectives on teaching and learning in the contemporary, information age. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer).

EDU502 - Tests and Measurements (3 cr.)

Introduction to educational and psychological testing. Construction, administration, scoring and interpreting various group and individual tests. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDU504 - Multi-Cultural Dimensions of Contemporary Education (3 cr.)

Social dimensions of education to be explored include: ethnicity and cultural pluralism in contemporary society; the impact of social and cultural systems/organizations on educational decisions; competing educational belief systems; and institutional responsiveness as it relates to multi-culturalism. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU508 - Curriculum Development: Elementary School (3 cr.)

Curriculum and instructional practices in the elementary school with particular reference to current issues and developments. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Prerequisite: EDU505 for MST students.

EDU509 - Curriculum Development: Middle and Secondary School (3 cr.)

Development, history, and current status of the middle and secondary school curriculum. Analyses of contemporary curriculum programs in terms of design, content and evaluation. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU5109 - Curriculum Development: Middle and Secondary School (4 cr.)

Intensive planning and implementation of instruction at the secondary school level including: secondary curriculum development, pedagogical techniques, best practices, positive learning environments, technology integration and multicultural considerations. 60 hour field placement. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU280 and student's major subject-specific methods course(s).

EDU5110 - Child Development for Education Professionals (2 cr.)

Survey of major psychological, socio-cultural, and learning development theories and issues from birth through late adolescence, with an emphasis on application to the PK-6 learning environment. This course meets SED mandates for the completion of the child abuse, violence training, and substance abuse awareness. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisite: MST Childhood majors only.

EDU512 - Seminar: Issues in Education (1 to 3 cr.)

Presentation, analysis, and discussion of current issues in education with teaching colleagues and consultants. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU5120 - Adolescent Development for Education Professionals (2 cr.)

Survey of major psychological, socio-cultural, and learning development theories and issues from birth through late adolescence, with an emphasis on application to the 7-12 learning environment. This course meets SED mandates for the completion of the child abuse, violence training, and substance abuse awareness. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisite: MST Adolescence majors only.

EDU513 - Education Research Methods (3 cr.)

Focus upon research theory, principles, and procedures. Emphasis on research design and implementation. Fundamentals of statistical reasoning, research analysis, interpretation and classroom application. (Spring, Summer, Winter & Fall).

EDU5130 - Assessment in Education (2 cr.)

This course includes topics on assessing student knowledge and skills, both quantitatively and qualitatively. It covers test construction and non-traditional assessment methodologies. Skills such as reading standardized test scores and analyzing what these mean are addressed. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MST Childhood and MST Adolescence majors only.

EDU514 - Introduction to Comparative Education (3 cr.)

A systematic, interdisciplinary approach to the comparative examination of education in a variety of cultures. Educational systems to include historic, political, economic, and social influences. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU5140 - Curriculum Design and Pedagogical Methods I: Grades 1-6 (3 cr.)

Theories and practices of curriculum development for the elementary and intermediate grades, including pedagogical techniques. Recent trends in elementary/intermediate school content, instructional design, models of teaching, classroom management and assessment. Emphasis on subject specific pedagogical methods and learning environments that engage students and that value diverse learners and multiculturalism. Includes 30 hours of learning environment field experience. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: MST Childhood majors only.

EDU5150 - Curriculum Design and Pedagogical Methods I: Grades 7-12 (3 cr.)

Theories and practices of secondary curriculum development and pedagogical techniques. Recent trends in secondary school content, instructional design, models of teaching, classroom management and assessment. Emphasis on subject specific pedagogical methods and learning environments that value diverse learners, multiculturalism, and engage students. Includes 30 hours or learning-environment field experience. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: MST Adolescence majors only.

EDU5160 - School and Culture in the 21st Century (2 cr.)

The nature and history of schools with focus on the interrelationship of school and democratic society, the purposes and goals of education and the teaching profession. Emphasis on the impact of education on the tenets of democracy. An exploration of the impact of 21st century social trends and forces as they relate to teaching and learning. Includes 10 hours of field experience. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MST Childhood and MST Adolescence majors or POI.

EDU5170 - Educational Technology I (2 cr.)

This course is an introduction on how to facilitate P-12 student learning through the use of various technologies and technology applications. Pre-service teachers focus on technological skill development with hardware and multimedia application and begin to construct lessons integrating technology with pedagogical practices. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: none. Prerequisites: MST Childhood and MST Adolescence majors or POI.

EDU5180 - Practitioner Research in Education I: Planning Research (2 cr.)

A conceptual framework for educators in their roles as producers and consumers of research. The basic concepts and principles important to planning inquiry projects are explored with an emphasis on how educators conduct research in settings where they work as practitioners. The focus will be on sensitizing educators to caveats and ethical issues by developing abilities to frame, analyze, evaluate, and critique research. Students will complete training in the protection of human research participants, and develop a research proposal that investigates educational practice. Students who have completed EDU475 may not take this course for credit. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: none. Prerequisites: MST Childhood and MST Adolescence majors or POI.

EDU5201 - Advanced Study in Content & Pedagogy: Curriculum Design (2 cr.)

This course examines and compares models of curriculum design, and surveys the history of curriculum development. Class sessions focus on the pedagogical knowledge required for the planning and design of curricula that facilitate development of students' enduring understandings. Students also establish curriculum maps in their academic content area in order to study advanced concepts in the discipline and link the concepts with curriculum design. (Note: This course is a checkpoint for portfolio submission in the C&I program.). (Fall). Corequisite: EDU5202; matriculation into C&I program.

EDU5202 - Advanced Study in Content & Pedagogy: Assessment Methods (2 cr.)

This course includes topics on assessment "of" and "for" learning. Students study and link content to appropriate assessment methodologies. Review of historical and contemporary practices and trends of assessment. The interrelationship of curriculum, instruction, assessment, and content standards is examined. Effective testing and evaluation linked to course outcomes and grading policies, current controversies and ethical implications of assessment, and the use of assessment data will be discussed. Course includes seminars, interactions with a content mentor to study advanced concepts in the specific content concentration, and connects to appropriate assessment techniques. (Note: This course is a checkpoint for portfolio submission in the C&I program.). (Fall). Corequisite: EDU5201. Prerequisite: matriculation into C&I program.

EDU5203 - Advanced Study in Content & Pedagogy: Research in Content-Specific Pedagogy (2 cr.)

Students in this course develop a deeper understanding of current pedagogical methods in their content areas. Content in students' academic disciplines is linked to appropriate and current pedagogical techniques. An intense focus is placed on reading, reviewing, critiquing, and reflecting on published literature about specific content methodologies. In addition to class sessions, students will research advanced concepts in their concentration and link them with appropriate pedagogical techniques. (Note: This course is a checkpoint for portfolio submission in the C&I program). (Spring). Corequisite: EDU5204. Prerequisites: EDU5201; matriculation into C&I program.

EDU5204 - Advanced Study in Content & Pedagogy: Portfolio & Mastery Teaching (6 cr.)

This course is the culminating experience in the Curriculum & Instruction degree program. Students will teach in a P-12 classroom setting using newly acquired skills in curriculum design, assessment, and pedagogy, linking each to advanced concepts in their academic disciplines. They will also present their final portfolio, illustrating growth in skills, concepts, and knowledge throughout the C&I program. Finally, students will prepare and present a final capstone project that illustrates advanced study in their content area and link that study to pedagogy, curriculum, assessment, and the topical issues in education. (Note: This course is the final checkpoint for portfolio submission in the C&I program.). (Spring). Corequisite: EDU5203. Prerequisites: EDU5201, EDU5202, completion of 21 credits in the C&I program and matriculation into C&I program.

EDU5205 - Curriculum and Instruction for Birth - Grade 2: Foundations (4 cr.)

Development of reasoning, creative expression, and perceptual-motor skills. Planning, implementing, and evaluating experiences for children ages Birth - 8 years, including those with special needs. This course includes a 10-hour field experience with young children. (Fall). Prerequisite: matriculation into C&I program or Certificate program in Early childhood Education Birth - Grade 2.

EDU521 - Analysis of Teaching (3 cr.)

Identification, description, and analysis of the research based elements and principles of effective teaching. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU522 - Developing Programs for the Gifted and Talented (3 cr.)

An analysis of gifted and talented programs, emphasizing projects on the local and regional levels. Presents techniques in the design, development, implementation and evaluation of programs. (Spring).

EDU5240 - Curriculum Design and Pedagogical Methods II: Grades 1-6 (4 cr.)

Exploration of elementary school curriculum design and teaching in collaboration with skilled mentors. Emphasis on the development and presentation of an integrated unit of instruction that incorporates learning strategies, technology and learning standards. Use of assessment and reflection to improve student learning. Includes 50 hours of field experience. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU5140; MST Childhood majors only.

EDU5250 - Curriculum Design and Pedagogical Methods II: Grades 7-12 (4 cr.)

Exploration of secondary school curriculum design and teaching in collaboration with skilled mentors. Emphasis on the development and presentation of an integrated unit of instruction that incorporates learning strategies, technology, content area literacy instruction, and learning standards. Use of assessment and reflection to improve student learning. Includes 50 hours of field experience. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: none. Prerequisites: EDU5150; MST Adolescence majors only.

EDU527 - Contemporary Early Childhood Education (3 cr.)

Study of basic concepts in child development, theories of early childhood education, curriculum development, and research. Examination of current status of early childhood education in the U.S. (Summer & Fall).

EDU5270 - Educational Technology II (2 cr.)

This course focuses on advanced concepts and skills for facilitating P-12 student learning through the use of technology. Technological skills continue to be developed in tandem with pedagogical practices that facilitate critical thinking and problem solving. Community technology resources are also explored. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: none. Prerequisites: EDU5170 or POI; MST Childhood and MST Adolescence majors or POI.

EDU5280 - Practitioner Research in Education II: Conducting Research (2 cr.)

Students will investigate educational practice by conducting original research under the guidance and supervision of college faculty. An informal report of the progress of the research will be presented as a preparation for sharing meaningful information with a broader audience in the future. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: none. Prerequisites: EDU475 or EDU5180; MST Childhood and MST Adolescence majors or POI.

EDU537 - Managing Disruptive Behavior in the Classroom (3 cr.)

Focus upon behavior problems, hostility, and disruption posed by an increasing number of children in schools today. Students will discuss and practice the application of choice theory and reality therapy in classroom situations through video and role-play activities. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

EDU538 - Classroom Management of Behavior (3 cr.)

A study of selected interpretations of human behavior for the educator. Primary focus on student behavior and the organization of physical arrangements, grouping practices, and ethical issues. Data collection procedures for the classroom setting are also discussed. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU555 - Thesis/Research Project Seminar (3 cr.)

Direction, assistance, and critical evaluation relating to the design, implementation, and presentation stages of the student research/thesis project. (Summer & Fall). Prerequisites: EDU513.

EDU558 - Ethical Issues in Educational Technology (3 cr.)

This course will cover a variety of legal, social, and ethical issues involved in utilizing technology in schools. Topics to be covered include: the concept of ethics, codes of ethics, ethical standards, child cyber-safety in schools, network security, Acceptable User Policies (AUPs), cyber-safety, and the curriculum, equitable access to technology resources, copyright, intellectual property, and digital plagiarism. The course is appropriate for all professional school personnel, as well as pre-professionals studying for a credential or certification.

EDU571 - Teaching Elementary Social Studies (3 cr.)

Examination of the New York State Social Studies curriculum. Focuses on recent curricular developments in the Social Studies, including methods, resources, content and materials with a special emphasis on inquiry processes. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Prerequisite: EDU505 for MST students

EDU572 - Culturally Responsive Teaching (3 cr.)

This course is designed to give students an understanding of cultural diversity and the issues related to it that they may face in their classrooms. Gender, ethnicity, race, sexual orientation, religious differences, geographical culture (rural/urban, etc.) language, and other areas of diversity will be addressed. The candidates will address the challenges and benefits of diversity in education and develop ways to use such diversity to enhance the learning experiences of their students. The students will learn methods, such as the use of translation software (this does not have to be purchased) as a communication tool, for working with language diverse students and their families to build bridges when language is a barrier. As a result of this course, candidates will be able to identify different types of diversity and their relationships to successful student outcomes, understand the effect on learning of stereotyping and ethnocentrism, communicate cross-culturally and develop learning plans to allow successful learning for diverse student groups.

EDU578 - Psychological Aspects of Classroom Instruction (3 cr.)

Focus upon the general processes of learning and cognition, the application of psychological theory to classroom teaching, and models of instruction. Students design, teach, reflect, and refine a model lesson in their subject area of certification. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

EDU580 - Technology Foundations for Education (3 cr.)

Application and integration of technology into pedagogical practices. Includes extensive hands-on with computers; software and website evaluation; demonstration and proficiency with a variety of hardware and software; technology-infused lesson development and implementation; and website development. (Winter, Spring, Summer, & Fall).

EDU582 - Maintaining an Effective Learning Environment (3 cr.)

This course introduces pre-service teachers to motivation and classroom management strategies that address all students in an inclusive classroom. Participants will investigate best practices of classroom management, how to establish a positive and motivating classroom climate, and management techniques that help students become responsible for their behavior and choices. The participants will also explore positive teacher-student relationships, analyze effective partnerships between families and schools, establish strategies for minimizing and preventing classroom and behavior management problems, and develop comprehensive and efficient time management plans. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU280 or POI.

EDU589 - Advanced Social Foundations (2 cr.)

This course explores the major ways in which the American public school system has both reflected and opposed the greater culture in which it is embedded, with special emphasis on the present and possible future trends affecting the structure and behavior of public schools. The roles of schools in society will be critically examined toward the objective of developing students' critical professional perspectives. Topics include but are not limited to the school's traditional role of social reproducer, the technological change to an "information culture," the effects of high stakes testing, the multiple inside and outside pressures toward reform, the global economy, and environmental and broad cultural changes (e.g. Third Wave immigration, migration patterns, and multicultural and diversity issues). (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU280 and student's major subject-specific methods course(s).

EDU591 - Differentiated Instruction and Assessment (3 cr.)

Teachers must find ways to create learning environments that support the needs of all students in the increasingly diverse classrooms of our schools. Differentiated instruction allows teachers to develop meaningful learning experiences for students at varying readiness levels and with different learning styles and interests. This course will examine the characteristics of a differentiated classroom and explore ways to create differentiated instructional learning units. Candidates will explore such topics as analyzing the learning needs of their students, planning and developing differentiated lessons that meet multiple learning needs, creating effective assessments for differentiated instructional units and managing a differentiated classroom.

EDU593 - Educational Psychology Applied to Teaching Adolescents (2 cr.)

This course provides in-depth survey of the major theories of motivation, cognition, and human development as they relate to teaching adolescents. It examines how adolescents learn, and how theoretical principles of learning apply to the classroom instruction of adolescents. This course will allow students to develop an understanding of how secondary education is informed and influenced by psychological theory and how these theories play out in the classroom. It will also explore empirical research in education and psychology to better understand what constitiutes best practices. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: EDU280; majors in BA/MST program.

ENG100 - College Writing I (4 cr.)

Entry-level writing course providing extensive practice in writing and reading in order to prepare students for ENG101, College Writing II. Readings and writing assignments will vary from section to section, but students will write 300-500 words per week, leading to a minimum of five out-of-class formal assignments (essays and argument-based new media written texts, such as a web-based film review incorporating Internet video excerpts; a podcast and script presenting student views on a new graduation requirement; etc.); at least 5000 words of finished copy by the conclusion of the course. Students will also gain experience with in-class writing. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in order to enroll in ENG101. Students who have credit for ENG101 or its equivalent cannot take ENG100 for credit. Special sections of ENG100 are available for students who speak and write English as a second language. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

ENG100R - College Writing I Recitation (0 cr.)

Students registering for ENG100 must register for the corresponding ENG100R recitation section.

ENG101 - College Writing II (3 to 4 cr.)

Extensive practice in writing and revising through multiple drafts, with the aim of helping students learn to think critically and to produce coherent college-level texts. Readings and writing assignments will vary from section to section, but students will write a minimum of five out-of-class formal assignments (at least 5000-6250 words or 20-25 pages of finished copy for all five combined), at least one of which will require research and documentation using multiple sources. Students must earn a grade of C (2.0) or better in ENG101 to meet graduation requirements. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: C (2.0) or better in ENG100 or placement by examination.

ENG111 - Visions of America (3 cr.)

Study of literature as means of understanding the narratives of American history, the development of common institutions in American society, how these institutions have affected different groups, and America's evolving relationship with the rest of the world. Although emphasis will vary, each offering will cover at least a 150-year period and will include aboriginal concerns, immigration, inequality, growth, colonialism, the environment, individual responsibility, issues of power and conflict, and the relationship between history and literature. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

ENG122 - Grammar and Punctuation Workshop (1 to 3 cr.)

Understanding English grammar and punctuation; emphasis on correcting errors in both. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101

ENG130 - Topics in English (1 cr.)

Various topics in literature taught at an introductory level. Topics might include single authors (C.S. Lewis, Washington Irving), themes (nuclear war fiction) or genres (melodrama). (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG160 - Introduction to Poetry (3 cr.)

Forms and conventions of poetry, appreciation of poets and their art. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG161 - Introduction to Fiction (3 cr.)

Forms and conventions of prose fiction, appreciation of the art of the short story and of the novel, preparation for more advanced studies in fiction. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG162 - Introduction to Drama (3 cr.)

Forms and conventions of the drama, appreciation of the play on the stage and as literature, preparation for more advanced studies in the drama. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG163 - Introduction to Film and Literature (3 cr.)

Examination and comparison of the narrative arts of film and literature. The course introduces students to film form and literary form, considers analogies between these forms, studies critical theories of film and literature, explores film adaptations, and examines the historical and aesthetic forces out of which film and literature grow. (Spring & Summer). Liberal arts.

ENG164 - Introduction to Shakespeare (3 cr.)

Introduction to Shakespeare's plays for students with little or no previous knowledge of Shakespeare or of drama. Students read and discuss eight to ten plays. Focus on both the aesthetic qualities of the plays--style, structure, tone, technique--and on the penetrating analyses of the human condition they present. Recommended for non-English majors. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG170 - Multiethnic American Literature (3 cr.)

An introduction to the comparative study of the literature produced by diverse U.S. ethnic groups, including Native American oral legends, narratives and testimonies, African American literature, and the writings of Latino and Asian Americans. Selected works serve as a way to understand each group's response to and relations with U.S. society and institutions, and to the mainstream historical narrative. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG195 - Fundamentals of Literary Study I: The Literary Text (3 cr.)

A writing intensive introducton to the study of individual literary works, with the relationship between formal properties on the one hand and the pleasures and values of reading on the other. Works studied will include poetry, fiction, and drama, with the greatest emphasis on poetry. This is one of two gateway courses to upper-level literature courses; therefore, learning the vocabulary of literary criticism, and how to write a paper of literary criticism, including research, is essential. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG196 - Fundamentals of Literary Study II: Trends and Movements (3 cr.)

A writing intensive introduction to the study of literary works as representative of trends, movements, and sensibilities, such as Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism, Feminism, and Post-Colonialism. Special attention will be paid to English and American Literatures. This is one of two gateway courses to upper-level literature courses; therefore, learning the vocabulary of literary criticism, including research, is essential. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ENG201 - Creative Writing (3 cr.)

Introduction to the art of creative writing with emphasis on language, craft and revision. Students will learn and apply the fundamentals of creative writing, and they will learn how to critique poetry and fiction. Attention to other genres as time permits. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG208 - Introduction to Writing Poetry (3 cr.)

Introduction to the art of writing poetry with emphasis on language, craft and revision. Students will learn and apply the fundamentals of poetry writing, and they will learn how to critique poetry. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG209 - Introduction to Writing Fiction (3 cr.)

Introduction to the art of writing fiction with emphasis on language, craft and revision. Students will learn and apply the fundamentals of fiction writing, and they will learn how to critique fiction. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG210 - Major English Writers to 1660 (3 cr.)

Introduction to and exploration of major English writers and literary periods before 1660. Readings will characterize significant literary shifts, genres, principal authors, forms, themes, attitudes, and cultural developments. Texts will be discussed as reflections of or responses to changing literary, religious, and political contexts. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG211 - Major English Writers since 1660 (3 cr.)

Introduction to and exploration of major English writers and literary periods since 1660 to the mid-twentieth century. Readings will characterize each major period, principal literary figures, forms, themes, attitudes, and cultural developments. Texts will be discussed as reflections of or responses to changing historical, literary, cultural, and political contexts. Liberal arts.

ENG245 - American Drama (3 cr.)

Selected American plays of the 19th and 20th centuries including major figures (O'Neill, Williams, Miller), experimental theatre movements, contemporary playwriting and the musical theatre. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG250 - History of Western World Literature I (3 cr.)

Selected literary, philosophical and historical masterpieces of the Western world from ancient times to the early Renaissance. Readings selected on the basis of literary excellence and their influence on the development of Western civilization. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG251 - History of Western World Literature II (3 cr.)

Selected literary, philosophical, and historical texts of the Western world, from the Renaissance to the present, with readings selected for their literary excellence, formal qualities, and influence on the development of Western literary culture. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG252 - The Bible (3 cr.)

The Bible introduces the student to the historical, literary, and philosophical contexts of this critical text of Western Civilization. A major goal of the class is to help students further appreciate western literature and history through an enriched knowledge of its biblical roots, inspirations, and allusions. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG255 - Literature and Science (3 cr.)

An introduction to literary study and appreciation for the science-minded student. Literary works, forms, conventions, devices, trends, and sensibilities are studied in relationship to the scientific/cultural environments they arise from and respond to. Works studied range from the ancient Greek drama to postmodernism. Poetry, fiction, and drama are included. (Annually). Liberal arts.

ENG262 - The Many Faces of Love (3 cr.)

A Thematic exploration of the variety of literary depictions of love, broadly defined. These include affection, friendship, erotic love, and charity. Liberal arts. (Spring)

ENG270 - Introduction to African American Literature (3 cr.)

Examines the evolution of African American literature, from its roots in Africa and the slave narrative to contemporary African American writers. Considers prevalent patterns and themes, including orality, identity, double-consciousness, etc. as well as the cultural, ethnic, and political positions that inform this tradition. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG271 - Latina/o Literature in the U.S. (3 cr.)

An introduction to the literature produced by Latina/o writers in the United States. From a transnational perspective, explores and critically analyzes various issues and themes such as migration, identity and ethnicity, cultural and linguistic hybridity, conflict and resistance, and the Latina/o constructs of urban and rural. These themes will be critically studied across gender, class, and racial lines. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG295 - Ancient Myth and Modern Mythmaking (3 cr.)

A study of the ways in which myth has been used throughout history to define, explain and explore human emotions. The course will cover both ancient myths and modern revisions of them. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG297 - Fundamentals of English Language Arts (3 cr.)

This course introduces adolescence education candidates in English language arts to the content knowledge, pedagogical principles, and teacher dispositions necessary to meet NCTE, NYSED, and institutional standards in their field. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

ENG301 - Expository Writing (AWR) (3 cr.)

A course providing extensive writing practice in various modes of discourse with emphasis on improving the student's writing style. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, sophomore standing.

ENG302 - Writing Poetry (3 cr.)

Development of skills in the writing of poetry through the study of various forms and the disciplines of using them. Experiments with both traditional and modern. Discussion of all work produced. (Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ENG201 or ENG208, and ENG101.

ENG303 - Writing Fiction (3 cr.)

Development of skills in the writing of fiction through the study of literary techniques and the disciplines for using them. Discussion of work produced. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ENG201 or ENG209, and ENG101.

ENG304 - Professional Writing (3 cr.)

An overview of the rhetorical principles and theoretical concepts behind professional writing, together with practical application in different writing contexts including web and multimedia. Emphasis on research, writing conventions, tone and style, design, formatting, editing, and revision applied to cover letters, resumes, personal statements, abstracts, memos, multi-media presentations, and social media projects. Students will gain professional writing skills applicable to a wide variety of careers. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/summer). Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG305 - Teaching Writing to Adolescents (3 cr.)

This course connects central theories of composition to the practical action a writing teacher takes in the secondary English classroom (Grades 7-12). Through readings, discussion, and individual and collaborative writing, students heighten their awareness of process and develop an image of the kind of writing teacher they hope to be. Related issues include: designing effective writing assignments, evaluation, peer and teacher conferencing. Students will write in expressive and reflective modes; they will orally synthesize assigned readings on composition theory and pedagogy; and they will design and facilitate a grade-specific writing lesson for the adolescent learner that meets national and state standards. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG297.

ENG306 - Topics in Writing (3 cr.)

Special topics in writing; topics vary with each offering. Topics might include writing for regional publications, writing autobiography or popular novel. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG310 - Middle English Literature (3 cr.)

Representative works of English literature from the 13th-15th centuries. Most works will be read in Middle English. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG311 - English Renaissance Writers (3 cr.)

Non-dramatic prose and poetry from the humanists to 1642. Writers considered: Spencer, Sidney, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne and Bacon. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG312 - Milton (3 cr.)

Poetry and major prose of John Milton, with attention to lesser writers of the Civil Wars and mid-century (Andrew Marvell, John Bunyan, John Donne, Lucy Hutchinson, Richard Baxter, Robert Hooker, and others). Major texts - Areopagitica, Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, and Samson Agonistes - will be considered in their cultural context and in depth. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, ENG196, sophomore standing.

ENG313 - Eighteenth-Century English Literature I (3 cr.)

This course presents an overview of English literature written during the first half of the long eighteenth century (1660-1714). Major figures include John Dryden, Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu. Because the literature of the period is intricately tied to politics and history, attention will be paid to philosophical, political, and religious issues. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG314 - Eighteenth-Century English Literature II (3 cr.)

This course presents an overview of English literature written during the second half of the long eighteenth century (1714-1800). Selected writers include Fielding, Sterne, Johnson, Goldsmith, Burke, Burney, and Wollstonecraft. Their works will be read in relation to their milieu. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG315 - English Romantic Poetry (3 cr.)

Works of the major Romantic poets--Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley and Keats. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG160 or ENG195 or POI.

ENG316 - Victorian Nonfiction and Poetry (3 cr.)

This course features Victorian writers other than novelists, paying attention to the nonfiction prose of such writers as Ruskin, Carlyle, and Arnold, and the poetry of writers such as Tennyson, the Brownings, and the Rossettis. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG318 - Playwriting (3 cr.)

Workshop-environment experience in writing for the stage. Scrutiny of the techniques involved in plot, characterization, dialogue and stage technique. Development of monologues, two-character sketches and extended scripts. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG321 - Gothic Novel (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to the Gothic novel, a genre that emerged during the eighteenth century in England. The class introduces students to the historical and aesthetic forces shaping the Gothic's treatment of anxiety toward the past represented by the supernatural, by ruins and relics from pre-Reformation England, by Catholics, by monasteries and abbeys, by scheming Machiavels, and by the alien Other. Feminist uses of the Gothic will be explored. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG323 - Topics in Literary Expression (3 cr.)

Significant topics, voices, themes or motifs not likely to be emphasized in standard course offerings. Examples: "Women in Drama," "Nineteenth Century Women Writers," "The Arthurian Legend," "Historical Novel." (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

ENG326 - Modern Short Story (3 cr.)

Study of works of short fiction by twentieth-century writers, with special emphasis on work published after World War II. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG330 - Flash Fiction (3 cr.)

Practice in writing very short fiction (1,000 words maximum). Students will read flash fiction and establish a working definition and criteria for its evaluation so that they may write their own pieces. Workshop intensive. Students should have workshop experience and already understand the dynamics of such a classroom setting. (Fall and/or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG201 or ENG209 or POI.

ENG333 - Writing Creative Non-fiction (3 cr.)

Examination of and practice in writing creative nonfiction, including such forms as personal experience, biographical sketches, personal opinion, reflection, evocations of place, and historical commentary. Liberal arts. Approved AWR. (Fall). Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG338 - Utopias in Literature (3 cr.)

Readings in Utopian and Dystopian literature from Plato to the present with emphasis on the last 100 years. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG339 - Science Fiction (3 cr.)

Science fiction texts and films with emphasis on the treatment of traditional literary themes, the depiction of the human condition, and the exploration of major global issues. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG340 - Literary Criticism (3 cr.)

Introduction to critical theories and application of them to primary texts. Short, frequent essays written from various critical viewpoints. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG342 - American Literature to the Civil War (3 cr.)

A study of American literature published before the Civil War; emphasis on six or seven writers such as Cooper, Poe, Douglass, Stowe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG343 - American Literature from the Civil War to World War I (3 cr.)

A study of American Literature published between the Civil War and World War I. The course will cover various genres. Authors vary but may include Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Wharton, DuBois, Jewett, Dreiser, Sui Sin Far, Ruiz de Burton, Zitkala Sa, and Crane. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG346 - 20th Century American Literature to 1960 (3 cr.)

A study of American literature published from 1900 to 1960. The course will cover various genres. Authors vary, but may include Robert Frost, T. S. Eliot, W. C. Williams, Marianne Moore, Langston Hughes, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Djuna Barnes, Zora Neale Hurston, Flannery O'Connor, James Baldwin, Eugene O'Neill, and Anzia Yezierska. (Fall and/or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG347 - American Literature Since 1960 (3 cr.)

A study of American literature published since 1960. The course will cover various genres. Authors vary, but may include Paul Auster, Kurt Vonnegut, Toni Morrison, Ishmael Reed, Donald Barthelme, Sandra Cisneros, Amiri Baraka, Maxine Hong Kingston, Cynthia Ozick, and Sherman Alexie. (Fall and/or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG353 - The Literature of Witness and Trauma (3 cr.)

This course familiarizes students with the "literature of witness" which includes texts that serve as a testimony to traumatic historical events, such as the Holocaust, slavery, "ethnic cleansing," apartheid, etc. Students will discuss, analyze, and write about this literature which expresses the need to remember these events and calls for social and global justice. The works covered in the course represent writers from across the globe and include autobiography, testimonio, novels, drama, poetry, and film. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG355 - Greek Drama in Translation (3 cr.)

Greek drama, its origins, its theatre and its themes. Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes are considered against the background of 5th and 4th century B.C. Athens; consideration of the meaning of Greek drama for our time. (Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG363 - Children's Literature (3 cr.)

Literature, traditional and modern, for children from ages three to twelve. Students will study children's literature as a literary genre, exploring the history of the genre and the interaction between audience and text. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG364 - Shakespeare (3 cr.)

Analysis of ten to twelve of Shakespeare's major plays representative of the genres (tragedy, history, comedy, romance) and of the stages in his career as a dramatist. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing.

ENG365 - Rhetoric and Writing Arts (3 cr.)

This course invites students to contemplate three fundamental questions: What is writing? What is a writer? What does writing do? Explores major ideas concerning written discourse; its rhetorical roots up to the development of composition theory; its variations and functions; issues involving writing aesthetics; the role of literacy, writing and writer in a world increasingly moving from print to multi-media. May be repeated for a total of six credits. (At least once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101; one of the following: ENG201, ENG208, or ENG209.

ENG366 - New Media (3 cr.)

This course is designed for students interested in new media as a subject of literary study, a creative medium, and/or the subject of a secondary English Language Arts curriculum. In it, each student cultivates an identity as an informed new media producer-consumer. Students use free software on their own and as a group to create and publish texts on the web. (Once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing.

ENG367 - Canadian Fiction (3 cr.)

Canadian novels and short stories written in English, focusing on the great flowering of literature since the 1960's. Typical texts by early, classic writers of this period such as Margaret Atwood, Robertson Davies, Alice Munro, and Mordecai Richler, and more recent writers such as Ann-Marie MacDonald, Wayson Choy, Dareen Greer, Joseph Boyden, Heather O'Neill, and graphic novelist Joe Ollmann. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101. Liberal arts.

ENG368 - Grammar for Writing (3 cr.)

This course will examine the nature of English syntax and the application of grammatical concepts to written style. In their study of grammatical structures and the reasons for creating and using them, students, as both writers and prospective English language arts educators, will work with grammar as a meaning-making system that integrates function and form for rhetorical effect. (Once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG369 - Autobiographical Writing/Memoir (3 cr.)

This course focuses upon first person texts about personal and family experience, including the personal essay, memoir and the diary/journal. Students will read, discuss, analyze and write in this genre with an emphasis upon various autobiographical styles and modes - from trauma narratives to the humor essay and the keeping of family histories. The works covered in the course represent a broad swath of memoir/autobiographical material and writing styles. Students will seek to locate and develop their own "writer's voice" and story narratives while practicing a variety of memoir strategies. (Once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG371 - Modern American Women Writers (3 cr.)

The works of selected American women writers studied in relation to literary history and to special contexts and developments defining and affecting women's roles in society and the arts. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG374 - Anne Frank: Adolescent Self (3 cr.)

Students will closely read the definitive version of Anne Frank's Diary and examine its lasting impact with critical lenses. Looking backward and forward, they will explore the historical context of the diary and the implications of its future study in the classroom. This course will prompt students to evaluate the merit of Anne Frank's legendary and iconic status. The readings should elicit informed oral and written responses on the following questions: How has Anne Frank come to represent the lost potential of the murdered children of her generation? How does she provide for us an intimate account of female adolescent development? How does Anne Frank offer us a unique profile of an emerging writer that can serve as a model to other adolescents? (Once Every 1-2 Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG375 - Literature for Classroom Teachers (3 cr.)

This course combines a study of current trends, theory, practices, and methods in English Language Arts with a strong foundation in literature: discipline-specific discourse, theory, and critical thinking/analysis. Also instructs candidates in how to apply state, professional, and institutional standards to teaching. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG305.

ENG376 - Reading the Jewish Tradition (3 cr.)

Jews refer to themselves as "am hasefer" or "people of the book." In this course we take that self-description literally, studying a select body of literature that both informs and defines the Jewish experience. This course will include texts from ancient to modern, exploring the themes of storytelling in Talmus/Midrash; folkloric storytelling; the immigrant experience; humor; family; feminism and love. Authors may vary but will likely always include Isaac Babel, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Cynthia Ozick, Michael Chabon, Chaim Potok, Allegra Goodman, Henry Roth, and poets Yehuda Halevi and Yehuda Amichai. (Once Every Two Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG382 - Longfellow: Poetry & Prosody (3 cr.)

An in-depth study of the poetry of Longfellow and American prosody. Works studied include both major (Evangeline, The Song of Hiawatha, "The Courtship of Miles Standish") and minor ("Paul Revere's Ride," "The Building of the Ship," "The Slave's Dream") poems. Attention paid both to his subject matter as a thinker on cultural and personal themes and to his craft as a poet. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101

ENG383 - Dickens (3 cr.)

An in-depth study focusing on Dickens's novels, short novels and journalism. Works studied include the longer novels, such as Bleak House, and short novels, such as A Christmas Carol. Dickens's journalistic work will also be studied. Attention paid to content, craft, and historical background. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG195

ENG384 - Jane Austen (3 cr.)

An examination of the six mature novels of Jane Austen and their context, with attention to Austen's style, her narrative voice, and her satire. (Once every one to two years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG389 - Major Authors and Their Craft (3 cr.)

A critical examination of significant works produced by one or two writers in any genre. Special attention to writerly issues, including manipulation of conventions, influence on other writers, popular and critical reception of works, and textual revision. Attention to writers as self-conscious literary craftspersons. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits for credit with different authors. (At least once per year). Prerequisites: ENG101 and Junior standing. Liberal arts.

ENG390 - Theories and Practices of Writing Tutoring (3 cr.)

This course focuses on an exploration and application of theories and practices of writing and writing tutoring. Through critical reflections on essays regarding rhetoric and composition studies and writing tutoring theory and practices, students will begin to formulate their own writing tutoring philosophies. At least seven hours of observation of tutoring in the Learning Center is required. This course can only be taken once and is a prerequisite to becoming a writing tutor in the Claude J. Clark Learning Center. Successful completion of this course meets all of the training requirements for CRLA Level III Master Tutor certification. (Fall). Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG398 - Internship: Saranac Review (1 to 3 cr.)

Allows and facilitates students to gain practical experience from working on the staff of the Saranac Review, a literary journal dedicated to publishing poetry, nonfiction, and fiction. As part of the internship, students would gain experience as editorial assistants. Their duties include logging and tracking manuscripts, reading and screening manuscripts, and performing other editorial and administrative tasks. Some work hours are expected to be worked in the Saranac Review office. May be repeated for up to six credits. (At least once per year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101; minimum of junior standing, POI.

ENG399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

ENG406 - Advanced Poetry Writing (3 cr.)

Developing advanced skills in the writing of poetry, with special emphasis on developing personal voice and style. Peer review and discussion of all works written. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG302, POI.

ENG407 - Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.)

Developing advanced skills in the writing of fiction, with special emphasis on developing personal voice and style. Peer review and discussion of all works written. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG303, POI.

ENG408 - Literary Magazine Workshop (3 cr.)

A production-oriented course, in which students will explore bookmaking for the literary market. The course is designed to introduce students to all aspects related to literary magazine production. Students will produce an annual issue of Z-Platt, the student literary magazine. (Once per year). Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing and POI.

ENG410 - Early American Literature (3 cr.)

Selected American authors from the earliest colonizers to the early 19th century. Emphasis: Ann Bradstreet, Edward Taylor, Cotton Mather, William Byrd II, Jonathan Edwards, Benjamin Franklin, Phyllis Wheatley and Charles Brockden Brown. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three literature credits, junior standing.

ENG412 - 19th Century British Novel (3 cr.)

The nineteenth-century novel from Austen to Hardy. Students will engage in close reading of selected works, with emphasis on the genre of the novel and on 19th century culture and society. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG413 - 20th-Century English Novel (3 cr.)

Chronological study of the British novel from the Edwardian period to the present. Readings drawn from the major writers with emphasis on analysis. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: six literature credits.

ENG414 - Modern English Poetry (3 cr.)

Representative works of such modern poets as Auden, Hardy, Housman, Owen, Sitwell, Thomas and Yeats. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG160 or ENG195 or POI.

ENG421 - Chaucer (3 cr.)

Close reading of Chaucer's major poetry, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales, toward an appreciation of his thought and method. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three-credit literature course, sophomore standing.

ENG422 - Literature and Global Issues (3 cr.)

Literary responses to major global issues or events; how global social, political, economic or ecological conditions interact with literary imagination. Topics to vary with each offering. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG430 - 19th-Century American Novel (3 cr.)

Selected 19th-century American novelists: Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Crane, Norris and Dreiser. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG431 - 20th-Century American Novel (3 cr.)

Study of representative American novels from early Modernism to the present, both major and minor writers; student analysis and discussion. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG432 - Modern American Poetry (3 cr.)

Representative works of modern American poets. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG160 or ENG195 or POI.

ENG435 - African American Novel (3 cr.)

Examines the African American novel from its roots in the late 18th century to the present. The objective is to analyze and understand how important artists and works have, along with historical and social forces, influenced the development of the novel. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG436 - Latino(a) Fiction (3 cr.)

Major novels and short fiction written by Latino(a) writers. Examines roots and emergence of Latino(a) narrative fiction; role of politics and history; aesthetics; prominent themes and current trends. Attention will be given to critical approaches to this body of work. Authors may include Anaya, Hinojosa, Hijuelos, Cisneros, Ruiz de Burton, Alvarez, Suarez, Tomas Rivera, and Mohr. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing.

ENG438 - American Gothic (3 cr.)

A study of the Gothic in American literature and culture from the 18th century to the present including works from authors such as Brown, Hawthorne, Poe, Gilman, James, Wharton, Faulkner, Lovecraft, Jackson, Morrison, and McCarthy. Students will also examine representations of the American Gothic in popular culture including graphic novels and films. Special attention will be paid to the American Gothic as a reflection of the culture's anxiety concerning history; gender; race and ethnicity; science and technology; and nature. (Once Every Two Years). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG439 - Topical Studies in American Literature (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse American literature topics; topics vary with each offering and may include a national or ethnic literature, literary movement, period, genre, theme or motif, a major author, group of authors, or critical approach. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and ENG195 or ENG196 or POI.

ENG443 - Seminar in Contemporary Literature (3 cr.)

A critical examination of significant works produced in the last two decades by writers influencing the contemporary international literary scene. The reading will cover all genres. (At least once per year). Prerequisites: ENG101 and junior standing. Liberal arts.

ENG444 - Arthurian Legend (3 cr.)

Literature dealing with King Arthur and his knights, from the 12th century to the 15th and beyond. The instructor may trace the evolution of the Arthurian legend from the Middle Ages to the present or may choose to focus primarily on the medieval legend. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG448 - Irish Literature (3 cr.)

Survey of Irish literature from the Irish Literary Revival (ca. 1890) to the present. All genres represented with special consideration of the works of Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O'Casey, and Trevor and of the historical and cultural context of Irish literature. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

ENG449 - Topical Studies in British Literature (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse British literature topics; topics change with each offering and may include a literary movement, period, genre, theme or motif, a major author, group of authors, or critical approach. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and ENG195 or ENG196 or POI.

ENG456 - Modern Drama: 1880 to 1925 (3 cr.)

British and continental drama from the height of the Victorian era; through Ibsen and the coming of realism; the emergence of expressionism in the war years; and the progression to the avant-garde of the 1920s. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and either THE110 or ENG195, or POI.

ENG457 - World Drama Since 1925 (3 cr.)

British and continental drama focusing on such phenomena as epic theatre, the absurdists, theatre of cruelty, agit-prop drama and multimedia experiments. Playwrights studied: Brecht, Durrenmatt, Beckett, Genet and Weiss. (Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG459 - Topical Studies in World Literature (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse World (non-British Isles, American or Canadian) literature topics; topics vary with each offering and may include a national or ethnic literature, literary movement, period, genre, theme or motif, a major author, group of authors, or critical approach. May be repeated for credit as topics change. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and ENG195 or ENG196 or POI.

ENG461 - Young Adult Literature (3 cr.)

An exploration of significant fiction written for young adults aged 12 to 18. Issues include literary evaluation criteria, literary themes and issues, and societal pressures upon content and form. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and ENG195.

ENG462 - Young Adult Science Fiction (3 cr.)

Significant works of science fiction and related speculative fiction written for the young adult audience. Issues include apocalypse, coming of age, futurism, posthumanity, power relationships, social and environmental responsibility, utopia/dystopia. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and a course in literature.

ENG480 - The Stratford Experience (1 cr.)

Students will study Shakespeare, the history of the Stratford Festival, and travel to Stratford, Ontario to watch the Stratford Shakespeare Festival's performances of his plays. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

ENG495 - Advanced Honors Project (3 cr.)

Significant undertaking written and produced under the direction of a faculty mentor. Project will consist of written criticism or research or a body of creative, expository or journalistic writing; may include photographic or other media displays as appropriate; optional oral presentation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG494 or JOU494, permission of department chairperson.

ENG496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Supervised tutoring or classroom instructional assistance in the Learning Center or an English/journalism course. A contract specifying each student's duties, approved by the course coordinator, will be on file in the department. Can be repeated to a maximum of six credits. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG305 or ENG390 is recommended.

ENG499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENG516 - Chaucer (3 cr.)

Selected works of Chaucer, with emphasis on The Canterbury Tales. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG521 - Modern American Novel (3 cr.)

Intensive study of selected twentieth century American novelists such as Dreiser, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, and selected post-World War II authors. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG539 - Science Fiction (3 cr.)

Topics in science fiction studies, including history of the genre, major authors (Asimov, Bradbury, Clarke) and themes (alien encounters, genetic engineering, nuclear holocaust.) (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG548 - Irish Writers (3 cr.)

Survey of Irish literature from the Irish Literary Revival (ca. 1890) to the present. All genres represented with special consideration of the works of Yeats, Synge, Joyce, O'Casey, and Trevor as well as contemporary women writers; the historical and cultural context of Irish literature; relationship between literature and other art forms, such as film and music. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG561 - Young Adult Fiction (3 cr.)

An exploration of significant fiction written for the young adult audience. Issues include literary evaluation criteria, literary themes and issues, and societal pressures upon content and form. (Fall). Liberal arts.

ENG568 - Contemporary Short Fiction (3 cr.)

Arbitrarily defining contemporary short fiction as fiction published after World War II, the course will include short-fiction writers whose work has been published within the last thirty years. International in scope; major emphasis, however, will be on American Writers of the 1960s and 70s. Included will be such writers as John Updike, Donald Barthelme, Jorges Luis Borges, Flannery O'Connor, Leonard Michaels, Bernard Malamud, Isaac Singer, Julio Cortazar, Robert Coover, Italo Calvino, Joyce Carol Oates, and others. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENG586 - Seminar in English Studies (3 cr.)

A selected topic, focusing on literature, writing, rhetoric, or English adolescent education. Emphasis on student research and analysis in a seminar format. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG587 - Topics in American Literature (3 cr.)

Special offerings in American Literature, involving major authors (Hawthorne, Hemingway), regional literature (Southern Writers to 1940), or themes (Capitalism in American Literature). May be repeated twice for credit with different topics. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG588 - Topics in British Literature (3 cr.)

Special offerings in British literature, including major authors (Dickens, Joyce), genre topics (Metaphysical Poetry), themes (Industrial Revolution in British Literature). May be repeated for credit with different topics. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG589 - Topics in Comparative Literature (3 cr.)

Special offerings in world literature, including major authors (Tolstoy and Dostoevsky, Hesse), national literature topics (19th Century French or Russian novel), or themes (Romanticism). May be repeated for credit with different topics. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Qualified senior undergraduates admitted with permission of the instructor.

ENG599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENV101 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3 cr.)

Environmental science is the study of natural ecosystems, human impacts on the environment, and sustainable management of the Earth's resources. Processes of the physical and biological environment are used as a basis for consideration of current environmental issues. Topics considered include energy consumption and global warming, water and air pollution, waste management, impacts of deforestation on biodiversity and other environmental changes occurring on a global scale. (Fall/Winter/Spring). Liberal arts.

ENV180 - Environmental Science Field Immersion (1 cr.)

First semester environmental science freshmen are introduced to SUNY Plattsburgh Environmental Science programs and faculty as well as environmental science professionals through field trips and/or lectures. This course is designed to help students explore career paths and introduce them to regional environmental science issues. (Fall). Prerequisite: POI.

ENV199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENV201 - Environment and Society (3 cr.)

Historical, ethical, economic, legal and policy aspects of environmental science are analyzed with an emphasis on their interrelationships. Various strategies of pollution abatement are considered. (Spring & Fall).

ENV206 - Environmental Technology I (3 cr.)

An overview of the current technological solutions available for waste management and pollution control. Subject matter will include a review of priority pollutants, contaminant sources, and an assessment of pollution control technologies for wastewater treatment, hazardous waste transport and disposal, air pollution, and noise pollution. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV101 or BIO102 or ENV201 or POI.

ENV214 - Wildland Fire (1 cr.)

An integration of the biotic and abiotic factors of fire-prone environments with fire behavior and fire effects on vegetation, wildlife, and nutrient cycles. The successes and failures of federal fire management policies and fire hazards for people living at the urban-wildland interface will also be discussed. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

ENV238 - Forest Mensuration (3 cr.)

Forest mensuration is one of the most fundamental disciplines within forest and related sciences. It deals with the measurement of trees and stands and the analysis of the resultant information. Students in this class will get firsthand experience with these measurements and analyses. This course also reviews the notable influence of statistics on forest mensuration methods and techniques; it reviews and evaluates elementary statistical concepts. Liberal arts. (Every Year at Clinton County CV-Tec).

ENV273 - HAZWOPER: Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency Response (2 cr.)

This course meets the requirements of the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) for hazardous materials operations and emergency response program which are required by both EPA and OSHA. The course leads to a 40-hour HAZWOPER certificate. This certification is a job requirement for many entry-level positions in the area of environmental consulting potentially filled by our programs in both geology and environmental science. (Winter/Summer). Prerequisite: senior standing.

ENV274 - Solid Waste Management and the Environment (1 cr.)

This course provides a broad look at the integration of solid waste management and its relationship with the environment through class work and field investigations at the Clinton County Landfill. An exploration of economics, regulations, waste management and sanitary landfill design will help lead to an understanding of how our production/consumption lifestyle impacts the environment, and the safeguards in place to help protect it. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

ENV299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ENV304 - Ecology (4 cr.)

Refer to BIO304 course description. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO102.

ENV304L - Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring & Fall).

ENV306 - Atmospheric Processes (3 cr.)

An introduction to atmospheric processes including energy transfer and interactions, condensation and precipitation, atmospheric circulation, climate, and climatic change. Emphasis will be placed upon how the atmosphere impacts various world ecosystems. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV101 or GEL101.

ENV307 - World Environments and People (3 cr.)

Study of each of the major world environmental realms. How people have adjusted lifestyles to live better with their environment and the extent to which people have used technology to change the environment. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: completion of natural science and social science general education requirements.

ENV310 - Environmental Planning (3 cr.)

Basic concepts and procedures of environmental planning, including environmental design concepts, open space conservation strategies, watershed protection, land use regulations, socioeconomic and political factors, and planning in the Adirondacks and Catskill Parks. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEL101 or GEG120 or ENV101 or ENV201.

ENV329 - Environmental Management (3 cr.)

Fundamental approaches of managing, land, air and water resources for environmental protection and pollution control. Emphasis on ecological principles as well as practical aspects of compliance with environmental regulations. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV101 or ENV201; ENV304/BIO304.

ENV332 - Plant Ecology (3 cr.)

Two-hour lecture and a three-hour laboratory. Examines important aspects of specialized areas of plant ecology. Lecture topics include interactions between plants and their environment, models of plant strategies and vegetation processes, and roles of vegetation as an ecosystem component. Laboratories emphasize vegetation sampling techniques and data analysis. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304/ENV304

ENV332L - Plant Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

ENV333 - Biostatistics (3 cr.)

Introduction to statistical analysis of univariate biological data, including: statistics of location and dispersion, analysis of variance (ANOVA), linear regression, correlation, and non-parametric tests. Discussion of experimental design and use of a statistical package for data analysis, followed by interpretation of results. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: A 100-level science course and sophomore standing.

ENV337 - Field Ecology (3 cr.)

A firsthand approach to field studies of Northern New York plants and animals and the environments in which they interact. General identification of organisms, and their population and community ecological relationships. Lectures and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304/ENV304.

ENV338 - Forest Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Evaluates interrelationships between major environmental factors in forested ecosystems. Models describing the growth of forest stands are discussed along with analyses of silvicultural systems for uneven-aged and even-aged forest stands. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304 (ENV332 is recommended).

ENV338L - Forest Ecology and Management Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV339L - Wetlands Ecology and Management Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV340 - Environmental Science Seminar (3 cr.)

Readings, research and writing on selected topics/issues in environmental science, seminar discussions and presentations. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing; ENG101; ENV201 or BIO102; LIB105 or LIB200.

ENV347 - Instrumentation and Water Quality Analysis (3 cr.)

Instrumental analysis of samples from aquatic systems involving automated colorimetry, atomic absorption spectrophotometry, gas chromatography, ion chromatography and high performance liquid chromatography. Students will learn basic analytical techniques and apply them in group projects investigating real-world water quality problems. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE101 or CHE112.

ENV347L - Instrumentation and Water Quality Analysis Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

ENV350 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Mapping (3 cr.)

Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS), map design, and ArcView GIS software licensed by Environmental Systems Research Institute. Students will prepare maps and store, retrieve, and analyze spatial data. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: GEG120 or GEL101 or POI.

ENV350R - GIS/Mapping Recitation (0 cr.)

Students registering for ENV350 must register for the corresponding ENV350R recitation section.

ENV355 - Principles of Remote Sensing (3 cr.)

Introduction to basic concepts in photogrammetry, air photo interpretation and remote sensing. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV101 or ENV201 or GEG120 or GEL101.

ENV356 - Environmental Technology II (3 cr.)

A continuation of ENV206. This course offers an advanced, quantitative approach to designing technological solutions for waste management and pollution control. Subject matter will include hydraulic transport systems, pollutant fate and transport in surface waters, stormwater management, water and wastewater treatment facilities, and solid waste management systems. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT131 or MAT222 or MAT225; ENV206; or POI.

ENV364 - Ecological Economics (3 cr.)

This course intertwines a traditional economic and an ecological approach to the study of the political economy of the environment. Ecological economics seeks to place economic activity in the context of the biological and physical systems that support life, including human activities. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ECO101 or ENV101 or ENV201 or GEG121.

ENV366 - Global Climate Change: Turning Knowledge into Action (3 cr.)

An introduction to global climate change. Course topics include the scientific principles of global climate change, including its detection, impacts, and mitigation strategies. The course will provide up-to-date information on anthropogenic global climate change and address the social, economic, and political aspects of this international environmental issue. Liberal arts. (Every Other Spring). Prerequisites: completion of natural science and technology general education requirement.

ENV370 - Soil Science (4 cr.)

Study of physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and their relationship to the environment. Includes the study of soil formation and profile characteristics, soil organisms, nutrients cycling and management, soil acidity and non-point pollution. Laboratory emphasizes scientific investigations of soil management questions. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO102; ENV304 or BIO304; GEL101; CHE101 or CHE111.

ENV370L - Soil Science Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV371 - Environmental Leadership (3 cr.)

Explores effective leadership in the environmental context and nurtures students' leadership capacities in a number of key areas crucial to environmental problem solving, such as: creating effective collaborations, environmental conflict management, participatory processes and community engagement, project planning and management, and social movements and change management. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing in an environmental major (ENV, EVS, GEG, GEL).

ENV399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ENV406 - Climate Change Science (3 cr.)

An introduction to the science of global climate change. Course topics will include radiative transfer and the Earth's energy balance, influence of Earth system components on the climate system (atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere), natural and human drivers of climate change, the detection and prediction of long-term climate trends, and the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: MAT221 or MAT224 or MAT228 or POI.

ENV407 - Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of restoration ecology. Emphasis placed on understanding key ecological principles that are applied to restore degraded ecosystems as well as project planning and management. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO/ENV304 and one advanced ecology elective or POI.

ENV409 - Senior Project (3 to 12 cr.)

Individual research on an environmental problem selected by the student with faculty guidance. Designed to give the student skills in proposal writing, methods and procedures of research and report writing. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior standing.

ENV411 - Water Quality Modeling (4 cr.)

Mathematical modeling of water quality. Hypotheses on the relationship between pollutant loading and resultant water quality will be formulated and tested. (Fall). Prerequisites: ENV206 or ENV305, MAT221, or POI.

ENV411L - Water Quality Modeling Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV417 - Environmental Impact Assessment (3 cr.)

Study of the environmental impact assessment process including major federal (NEPA), state (SEQR), regional and local regulations; environmental impact statement preparation; assessment methodologies; and public participation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG120 or ENV201 or ENV310; junior standing.

ENV419 - Geographic Information Systems Applications (3 cr.)

Use of geographic information systems (GIS) for analysis. Applications in the environmental sciences, land use planning, and environmental impact assessment. Use of ArcMap, Spatial Analyst and 3-D Analyst. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV350/GEG350 or POI.

ENV421 - Environmental Law and Policy (3 cr.)

This course analyzes the role played by the different branches of government and the public in shaping and determining environmental policy and law. Major environmental statutes and agency regulations at the local, federal and international level are examined. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and either ENV304 or GEL310 or PSC311 or GEG332 or ECO392 or POI.

ENV430 - Wildlife Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Wildlife Ecology seeks to explore the natural history, biodiversity, diel cycles, behavior and movement patterns, food preference, and community and habitat interactions among wildlife species. Exploration of methods for surveying and identifying wildlife, specifically vertebrates, will offer opportunities for discussion of primary literature. Independent and group field research will stem from careful primary literature searches and class discussion. Through trapping, surveys, animal tracking using GPS and radio-telemetry, strict adherence to the scientific method, and GIS analysis, students will gain first-hand knowledge of tools for the wildlife professional. The course will combine morning lecture with afternoon data collection, and evening analysis and presentation. Liberal arts. (Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: ENV/BIO304.

ENV431 - Freshwater Ecology (4 cr.)

A study of the biological, chemical and physical features of lakes and other inland waters. An analysis of the interactions between biological communities and their aquatic environment. Laboratory involves examination of freshwater biota and habitats, survey of limnological methods and analysis of data. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304/ENV304.

ENV431L - Freshwater Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV433 - River Ecology (4 cr.)

Introduction to the ecology of river and stream ecosystems. Analysis of biological communities, physical and chemical attributes, watershed dynamics, and current ecological theory. Field investigation of Adirondack streams and rivers. Weekly lecture and laboratory sessions. (every other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV304/BIO304 or POI.

ENV433L - River Ecology Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV436 - Population and Community Ecology (3 cr.)

An introduction to the growth, structure and regulation of natural populations and their organization into plant and animal communities. Topics covered will include population genetics and evolution, limiting factors, competition, predator-prey relationships, concepts of organism association into communities, trophic structure, food webs and ecological succession. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV/BIO304.

ENV439 - Wetland Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Introduction to the hydrological, chemical, and biological interactions in wetland ecosystems. Emphasis placed on integrating ecological, social, and economic values into management and protection of wetland habitats. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: BIO/ENV304 and CHE101 or CHE111 and junior standing.

ENV440 - Agriculture and the Environment (3 cr.)

Integration and analysis of the multiple facets of animal agriculture and its interaction with the environment including: farm management, biotechnology, soil, and waste management, nutrient management and sustainable agriculture. Emphasis will be placed on the agricultural and environmental interface. Lecture and lab. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV304; CHE101 or CHE111/CHE112 or POI.

ENV440L - Agriculture and the Environment Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

ENV444 - Fisheries Ecology and Management (3 cr.)

Introduction to fisheries ecology and management. Topics include ichthyology, principles of fishery science, case studies of freshwater and marine fishery management successes and failures, aquaculture, sustainable fisheries issues, history of Great Lakes fisheries, and Lake Champlain fishery topics. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: ENV304/BIO304 or POI.

ENV451 - Advanced Topics in Geographic Information Systems (3 cr.)

Advanced Geographic Information System (GIS) methods and contemporary issues are explored. Topics include Web and smart phone applications, geodatabase principles, Python programming for GIS, raster modeling, network analysis, and decision support models. Students will use ESRI ArcGIS and other software as appropriate. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ENV350/GEG350 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems with a grade of C or better. ENV419 GIS Applications recommended.

ENV455 - Advanced Remote Sensing (3 cr.)

Advanced topics in remote sensing including concepts in electromagnetic radiation, sensors and platforms, and image interpretation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENV355.

ENV462 - Ecosystem Ecology (3 cr.)

An overview of theory and concepts in ecosystem ecology through a survey of the literature, including classical papers. Source materials will be evaluated and critiqued through a combination of lectures, written assignments, and student-led discussions. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304 or POI.

ENV480 - Advanced Topics in Ecology (3 cr.)

Specialized subjects in environmental science with direct application to modern environmental issues. Topic varies with instructor and semester; potential subjects include landscape ecology, preservation of ecological diversity, global climate change, fire ecology, population ecology. Course includes reading original research papers, giving oral presentations and writing term papers. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior environmental science major or POI.

ENV481 - Sustainability (3 cr.)

A multidisciplinary approach will be used to introduce students to the concept of sustainability and explore sustainable development issues at the local, national and international levels. Topics such as the historical development of the concept of sustainability, the equitable distribution of ecosystem services and sustainable economic development will be explored. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and either ENV304 or GEL310 or PSC311 or GEG332 or ECO392 or POI.

ENV498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

(Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENV499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

ENV507 - Restoration Ecology (3 cr.)

Introduction to the interdisciplinary field of restoration ecology. Emphasis placed on understanding key ecological principles that are applied to restore degraded ecosystems as well as project planning and management. Students who have taken ENV407 for credit are ineligible for credit in ENV507. Liberal arts. (Spring).

ENV519 - GIS Applications (3 cr.)

Application of geographic information systems (GIS) for analysis in the natural sciences, land use planning, and environmental impact assessment. Students will engage in a guided research project. Use of ArcMap, Spatial Analyst and 3-D Analyst. Students may not receive credit for both ENV419 and ENV519. (Spring). Prerequisite: ENV350 or GEG350 or POI.

ENV521 - Environmental Law and Policy (3 cr.)

This course analyzes the role played by the different branches of government and the public in shaping and determining environmental policy and law. Major environmental statutes and agency regulations at the local, federal and international level are examined. Students undertake extensive literature research on a legal or policy topic approved by the instructor. Credit will not be given for both ENV421 and ENV521. Prerequisites: an undergraduate degree in environmental science or related field or POI.

ENV530 - Wildlife Ecology and Management (4 cr.)

Wildlife Ecology seeks to explore the natural history and behavior of wildlife species. Exploration of methods for surveying and identifying wildlife, specifically vertebrates, will offer opportunities for discussion of primary literature. Through trapping, surveys, animal tracking using GPS and radio-telemetry, strict adherence to the scientific method, and GIS analysis, students will gain first-hand knowledge of tools for the wildlife professional. An independent research project, requiring time outside of class, will be developed, implemented, and presented by the graduate student. Student may not receive credit for both ENV430 and ENV530. (Fall). Prerequisite: one upper-division ecology course beyond general ecology or POI.

ENV531 - Freshwater Ecology (4 cr.)

A study of the biological, chemical, and physical features of lakes and other inland waters. An analysis of the interactions between biological communities and their aquatic environment. Laboratory involves examination of freshwater biota and habitats, survey of limnological methods and analysis of data. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Prerequisites: graduate standing, bachelors degree in science.

ENV533 - River Ecology (4 cr.)

Advanced ecology and management of river and stream ecosystems. Analysis of biological communities, physical and chemical attributes, watershed dynamics, and current ecological theory. Field investigation of Adirondack streams and rivers. Weekly lectures and laboratory sessions. Students cannot receive credit for ENV533 if they have previously received credit for ENV433. (Every Other Fall). Prerequisite: one upper division ecology course beyond general ecology or POI.

ENV536 - Advanced Population and Community Ecology (3 cr.)

A recitation course that builds on theory and models of population growth, regulation, community stability and persistence given global change concerns. In depth student-led discussion will focus on population ecology, including population genetics and evolutionary ecology, regulation/limitation debate, equilibrium versus non-equilibrium theory, competition theory, dynamics of direct and indirect predation, community assembly rules, and metapopulation dynamics. Literature surveys will culminate in a review paper on a population or community ecology topic and laboratory experiments will test applications of population growth models under various environmental treatment scenarios and be written as a sample of primary literature. Students who have received credit for ENV336 or ENV436 may not receive credit for ENV536. (Spring). Prerequisite: ENV/BIO304.

ENV544 - Fisheries Ecology and Management (3 cr.)

Fisheries ecology and management. Topics include ichthyology, principles of fishery science, case studies of freshwater and marine fishery management successes and failures, aquaculture, sustainable fisheries issues, history of Great Lakes fisheries, and Lake Champlain fishery topics. Liberal arts. (Spring).

ENV562 - Ecosystem Ecology (3 cr.)

An overview of theory and concepts in ecosystem ecology through a survey of the literature, including classical papers. Source materials will be evaluated and critiqued through a combination of lectures, written assignments and student-led discussions. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: BIO304 or ENV304 or POI

ENV580 - Advanced Topics in Ecology (1 to 4 cr.)

Specialized subjects in environmental science with direct application to modern environmental issues. Topics vary with instructor and semester; potential subjects include landscape ecology, preservation of ecological diversity, global climate change, fire ecology, insect ecology, advanced concepts in ecology and others. Ecological concepts for the topic covered will be developed through reading original research papers, giving oral presentations, and written assignments. Can be repeated for credit with a different topic. Students can receive credit for this course only if they have not received credit for ENV 480 with the same topic. Prerequisite: Graduate Student Standing.

ENV581 - Sustainability (3 cr.)

A multidisciplinary approach will be used to introduce students to the concept of sustainability and explore sustainable development issues at the local, national and international levels. Topics such as the historical development of the concept of sustainability, the equitable distribution of ecosystem services and sustainable economic development will be explored. Students undertake extensive literature research on a topic approved by the instructor. Credit will not be given for both ENV481 and ENV581. (Spring).

ENV595 - Graduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Original research project individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. Course may be repeated. (Fall/Spring).

ENV599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

ESL001 - Intensive Summer English Program (0 cr.)

Six-week intensive English language program for speakers of other languages. Program will provide instruction in speaking, listening, reading and writing English. All levels of existing English language proficiency are accommodated. (Summer).

ESL090 - Writing: Developing Paragraphs (3 cr.)

Writing course to help students develop sentences and paragraphs for academic writing. Focus is on organization, grammar, vocabulary, and mechanics. ESL090 credit counts toward semester credit load but does not count toward the credits or grade point average required for graduation. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: appropriate TOEFL or placement test score.

ESL092 - Grammar Editing for Speakers of Other Languages (3 cr.)

Intermediate-level grammar practice. Focuses on verb tenses, noun phrases and clauses, articles, prepositions, and punctuation. Students practice editing their own writing work. Note: ESL092 credit counts toward semester credit load but does not count toward the credits or grade point average required for graduation. (Fall). Prerequisite: appropriate TOEFL or placement test score.

ESL094 - Listening Comprehension for Speakers (3 cr.)

Extensive listening practice and development of listening skills enabling students to better understand academic lectures and more efficiently take notes. ESL094 credit counts toward semester credit load but does not count toward the credits or grade point average required for graduation. (Spring & Fall).

ESL096 - Conversational English for Speakers of Other Languages (3 to 4 cr.)

Extensive listening and speaking practice will help students participate in a meaningful manner in the oral/aural communication of university and professional life. Note: ESL096 credit counts toward semester credit load but does not count toward the credits or grade point average required for graduation. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: appropriate TOEFL or placement test score.

ESL098 - Reading English for Speakers of Other Languages (3 cr.)

The development of reading skills and vocabulary will prepare students to read textbooks with greater comprehension and efficiency without translating into their own languages. Students are also introduced to concepts important to American culture. Note: ESL098 credit counts toward semester credit load but does not count toward the credits or grade point average required for graduation. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: appropriate TOEFL or placement test score.

ESL102 - Advanced Grammar Editing (3 cr.)

Continuation of ESL092 for students who need additional practice with grammar and in editing their own written work. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: ESL092 or appropriate TOEFL or placement tests.

ESL104 - Advanced Listening (3 cr.)

Advanced level listening practice and development of listening skills enables students to better understand academic lectures and more efficiently take notes. Listening practice in other styles such as news broadcast, informal conversational English. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: ESL094 or appropriate TOEFL or placement test score.

ESL106 - Advanced Conversational English (3 cr.)

Extensive practice in academic speaking and listening and communication skills. Preparation of students for successful communication in and out of class with their professors and fellow students. Discussion of concepts important to American culture. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: ESL096 or appropriate TOEFL or placement test score.

ESL107 - Advanced Pronunciation (1 cr.)

A lecture/workshop to improve the pronunciation of non-native speaking students. The course will also increase students' ability to pronounce the phonemes of English. The course also addresses the stress, intonation and rhythm of formal and informal spoken English. It is suitable for students who are enrolled in both intermediate and advanced-level ESL courses. Course may be repeated up to two (2) times. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ESL108 - Advanced Reading (3 cr.)

Extensive reading of material at the college level including excerpts from university textbooks. Extensive practice of academic reading and study skills. Discussion of concepts important to American culture. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: ESL098 or appropriate TOEFL or placement test score.

ESL109 - Advanced Vocabulary Skills (1 cr.)

A lecture/workshop to increase, broaden and expand the vocabulary of non-native speaking students in preparation for academic reading and writing. The course will also increase students' knowledge of informal American English, e.g., idioms, collocations, etc. The course addresses all four communicative skills. It is suitable for students who are enrolled in advanced-level ESL courses or who have a high level of proficiency in English. Course may be repeated up to two (2) times. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

ESL120 - Academic Study Skills (1 cr.)

This course will be linked to a selected Arts and Science General Education course. It is designed to help students comprehend the concepts and key vocabulary of the selected course, e.g., HIS102. Students will get assistance in comprehending the lectures and the assigned readings, in preparing written assignments, and with the strategies for taking quizzes and exams. This course is suitable for students who have completed advanced-level ESL courses or who have a high level of proficiency in English. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: completion of ESL102, ESL104, ESL106, and ESL108, or a high level of proficiency in English (76 on the Internet-based TOEFL).

ESL496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Supervised tutoring or classroom instructional assistance in the Learning Center or an ESL course. A contract specifying each student's duties, approved by the program coordinator, will be on file in the program office. Can be repeated to a maximum of six credits. (Fall & Spring). Prerequisite: permission of program coordinator.

ESL499 - English as a Second Language Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

EVS101 - Introduction to Environmental Studies (1 cr.)

A one-credit introduction to the Environmental Studies major that explores environmental problems from a variety of perspectives in the social sciences and the humanities. The course introduces the discipline of environmental studies, its value in modern society, and the literature, research, practice and writing typical of other courses in the program. (Fall). Liberal arts.

EVS432 - Environmental Governance (3 cr.)

The course focuses on the social, economic, legal and political structures that shape our interactions with the environment today. It highlights the interrelations with environmental governance at global, national and local levels. Students will learn how to integrate public participation to address the challenges of environmental governance. (Every other spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG332 or SOC367.

EXP100 - Expedition Experience (0 cr.)

This course is a required adjunct to some of the upper level Expeditionary Studies disciplinary courses, offering exposure to the processes and behaviors of expeditionary travel in remote settings. Locations range throughout the U.S. and Canada, as well as abroad, including, for example, The United Kingdom, Nepal, Mexico, and Tanzania. The length of travel varies. Students enrolled in upper level, disciplinary expeditionary studies courses, will be automatically enrolled in this course to identify the required field experience. May be repeated without limit. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: enrollment during previous semester in the designated upper-level EXP course.

EXP101 - The History and Culture of the Expedition (3 cr.)

The course is organized thematically to emphasize the contingent nature of expeditions within local times and places. It is also roughly chronological to emphasize themes of change and continuity over time. The class emphasizes the history of expeditions in and from Europe and the United States since the 1300s with a focus on contextualizing the practice of expeditions into western history. Some of the themes to be discussed include the role of religion, colonialism, science, and trade in the history of expeditions. (Fall & Spring).

EXP121 - Outdoor Living Skills (4 cr.)

This course introduces camp-craft and basic backcountry skills. These skills are applicable to any environment and enable students to safely engage the outdoors for intellectual, aesthetic, social, and recreational purposes. The course uses an immersive, experiential pedagogy in field situations as well as readings, discussions, and journal-keeping. The elements and practices specific to planning adventure journeys will be highlighted. Equipment and transportation provided; requires at least one overnight. (Fall - Spring ).

EXP122 - Introduction to Paddle Sports (2 cr.)

This course introduces various forms of paddle sports, including sea kayaking, white water kayaking and open canoe touring. Course includes discussion of the history of paddle sports with attention to different aboriginal origins, the evolution of paddle sports and equipment design. Skill development includes boat control skills, emergency procedures and a variety of rescue techniques. In addition to skill clinics, the course will include a variety of tours. (Fall).

EXP170 - Movement and Balance in Kayaking (1 cr.)

This pool-based kayaking course focuses on introducing, maintaining and improving safety, balance, technique and fitness during the kayaking off-season. Offers revisions for standard techniques and an introduction to new techniques. For beginner and experienced paddlers. (Fall & Spring).

EXP180 - Introduction to Rock Climbing (2 cr.)

This introduction to rock-climbing orients new climbers to the systems, protocols, and foundation techniques of rock climbing. The course focuses on movement techniques, protection systems, and belaying skills, in addition to covering an introduction to climbing equipment, rappel techniques, and the use of friction hitches. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer).

EXP183 - Introduction to Ice Climbing (2 cr.)

This introduction to ice climbing orients new climbers to the systems, protocols, and foundation techniques of ice climbing. The course focuses on the use of crampons and ice axes, movement techniques, protection systems, and belaying skills, in addition to covering an introduction to climbing equipment, rappel techniques, and the use of friction hitches. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer).

EXP186 - Introduction to Free-Heel Skiing (2 cr.)

Introduction to equipment and techniques for modern free-heel skiing, including both Nordic and alpine skills. The Nordic component introduces backcountry skiing skills and techniques for cross-country travel. The alpine component introduces downhill techniques such as parallel and telemark turns. (Spring). Prerequisite: experience with alpine and Nordic skiing at beginner level or above.

EXP195 - Whitewater Kayaking (2 cr.)

Introduction to recreational whitewater kayaking. Class includes discussion of the history of whitewater kayaks with attention to the evolution of kayak and paddle design. Skill development includes a variety of paddle strokes, wet exits, and self-rescues, and general boat handling techniques. In addition to skill clinics, course includes a variety of paddling experiences. (Spring). Prerequisites: EXP122 and EXP170.

EXP199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

EXP221 - Outdoor Living Skills II (3 cr.)

Expands and refines camp-craft and basic backcountry skills introduced in EXP121. Introduces skills, equipment, concepts and standard practices necessary for day and multi-day expeditions in more extreme climates and terrains. The class is taught at the Twin Valleys Outdoor Education Center (Lewis, NY) and other regional settings. The course uses an immersive, experiential pedagogy in field situations as well as readings, discussions, and journal-keeping. Outdoor ethics and low-impact practices will be highlighted. Equipment and transportation provided; requires at least two overnights. (Spring). Prerequisite: EXP121.

EXP252 - Introduction to the Principles of Paddlesport Touring (2 cr.)

This course introduces the logistical, camp craft and journeying practices particular to and necessary for multi-day touring in human powered watercraft, emphasizing the expanded skills and environmental complexities inherent in multi-day paddling trips. Offered in either kayaks or canoes, EXP252 includes a minimum of two self-supported overnights. May be repeated when offered in different watercraft for a maximum of 4 credits. (Fall). Prerequisite: EXP122.

EXP272 - Planning Sea Kayaking Journeys (1 cr.)

Sequel to EXP172, this course concentrates on linking the components introduced in the previous course to building a broader understanding of the open water environment. Relating cartography, climate and tidal information is necessary to predict conditions, identify dangers and plan safe routes and contingency procedures. Relevant for all level trips from half-day to multi-week expeditions. (Fall & Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: EXP172.

EXP282 - Group Dynamics for Outdoor Leaders (3 cr.)

This course introduces the central concepts of the role of the leader in outdoor settings. Topics include group dynamics, formative stages, group assessment, group cohesion, group facilitation, conflict resolution, reflective listening, leadership role, facilitation skills, transference, and reflection. This course is designed for students who plan to lead groups in outdoor settings. (Spring). Prerequisites: EXP major, sophomore standing.

EXP299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall - Spring).

EXP303 - Adventure Travel and Tourism (0 to 3 cr.)

This course explores global cultures through the lens of adventure travel and tourism. The central goals of EXP303 are to define adventure tourism and travel, to identify the impacts of these on the traveler and the host nation, and, finally, to investigate these in an actual adventure travel experience. Course includes campus study and travel to such locations as Nepal, Baja, Mexico, The Canadian Rockies, and the British Isles among others. (Fall). Liberal arts.

EXP304 - International Expeditionary Studies Field Practicum (3 to 15 cr.)

Variable length field experience and practicum. This field practicum is for students enrolled in an accredited adventure program in a non-U.S. location, such as those offered by The National Outdoor Leadership School. Credit hours depends on the length of the field experience and can range from a minimum of three weeks to a full semester. The EXP International Field Practicum must take place in a non-U.S. location and include technical adventure-skills training, adventure leadership opportunities, and an extended expedition. Completion of EXP304 requires submission of a portfolio addressing prescribed topics such as expeditionary thinking and eco-tourism. (Fall & Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: acceptance by the Study Abroad Program; acceptance by the accredited adventure program; POI.

EXP360 - Wilderness First Responder (3 cr.)

Beyond first aid skills are medical skills. This course provides students the knowledge to practice basic medical skills in wilderness environments. Topics include patient assessment, splinting, wound care, cold and heat emergencies, burns, pharmacology, care of the cervical spine and an introduction to neurological exam in remote settings. All skills will be practiced in field exercises and mock rescue settings. (Winter).

EXP370 - Topics: Outdoor Sports and Culture (3 cr.)

This course combines intellectual reflections and experiential learning. The primary subject matter varies, but the course always includes experiential opportunities in the sport and a study of the history and culture of the sport. Topics can include "climbing and culture," "canoes, kayaks and culture," etc. May be repeated one time with different topic. (Fall, Spring, Winter). Liberal arts.

EXP375 - Kayak Touring (3 cr.)

The first of two intermediate level sea kayaking courses, EXP375 teaches the fundamental skills, concepts and standard practices necessary for extended and independent sea kayak touring. The process is presented as the application of technical, environmental, and organizational skills. The course identifies a reflective process of "thinking in action" and provides theoretical foundations and rationales for the application of sea kayak skills. (Fall). Prerequisites: EXP170, EXP252, EXP272, and POI.

EXP376 - Sea Kayaking: Introduction to the Ocean Environment (3 cr.)

The second of two intermediate level sea kayak courses, EXP376 advances the fundamental concepts and standard practices that are the foundation of ocean travel by kayak. These include advanced kayaking skills for ocean settings, navigation and route finding in open waters, basic ocean travel skills, and strategies for risk management. The class continues to develop the reflective expeditionary process of "thinking in action," here providing theoretical foundations and rationales for the application of ocean kayak expedition skills. (Fall). Prerequisite: POI.

EXP380 - The Rock Climbing Process (3 cr.)

The first of two intermediate level rock climbing courses. EXP380 teaches the fundamental concepts and standard practices that are the foundation of rock climbing. The process is presented as the application of technical, environmental, and organizational skills. The course identifies a reflective process of thinking in action and provides theoretical foundations and rationales for the application of rock climbing skills. (Fall). Prerequisite: EXP180.

EXP381 - The Rock Climbing Process II (3 cr.)

The second of two intermediate rock climbing courses, EXP381 teaches the concepts and practices that are required for use of artificial protection in top-rope construction and participation in multi-pitch rock climbs. The process of becoming a safe, capable, and responsible "second," requires understanding of the complete multi-pitch process; top-rope construction is a central component of this. EXP381 prepares students to assume the role as lead rock climbers. (Fall). Prerequisite: POI.

EXP384 - The Ice Climbing Process (3 cr.)

EXP384 teaches the concepts and practices that are required for use of artificial protection in top-rope construction and participation in multi-pitch ice climbs. The process of becoming a safe, capable, and responsible "second," requires complete understanding of the multi-pitch process. Successful completion of EXP384, including a skills competency test, prepares students to assume the role as lead ice climbers. (Spring). Prerequisite: EXP380.

EXP386 - The Backcountry Day Touring Process (3 cr.)

The first of three intermediate level ski mountaineering courses, EXP386 teaches the fundamental concepts and standard practices that are the foundation of ski mountaineering, those of backcountry skiing. The process is presented as the application of technical, environmental, and organizational skills. The class indentifies a reflective process of "thinking in action" and provides theoretical foundations and rationales for the application of ski mountaineering skills. (Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

EXP387 - The Backcountry Multi-Day Touring Process (3 cr.)

EXP387 advances the fundamental concepts and standard practices that are the foundation of extended backcountry skiing. These include advanced skiing skills in backcountry terrain, navigation and route finding in mountains, basic snow climbing techniques and strategies for risk management. The class continues to identify the reflective expeditionary process, here providing theoretical foundations and rationales for the application of backcountry skiing skills in a self-supported, multi-day backcountry setting. (Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

EXP388 - The Ski Mountaineering Process (3 cr.)

The third of three ski process courses, EXP388 emphasizes the core competences required in ski mountaineering. Beginning with an analysis of the idea of leadership and relevant learning theories, this course studies individual behavior and motivation in adventure settings, group dynamics, risk management, and specialized ski mountaineering skills for adventure leaders. These materials are addressed in actual ski mountaineering settings and with backcountry ski groups. (Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

EXP399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall - Spring).

EXP435 - Expedition Theory and Planning (3 cr.)

Identifies the ideas and planning necessary to mount an adventure expedition. Recognizing a process that applies to all expeditions, EXP435 prepares students in the Expeditionary Studies major for their senior expedition. The course covers all aspects of expedition planning, including creating a team to designing a risk management plan to researching goals. Students in this class will prepare an expedition prospectus. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: ENG101, 6 hours of 300 level EXP coursework, enrollment in at least 3 hours of 400 level EXP coursework. (Fall).

EXP436 - Senior Expedition (3 cr.)

This course is the experiential culmination of the expeditionary studies curriculum. Offered as a supervised seminar, EXP436 combines skill and theory into a student directed expedition. Students will plan, prepare for, execute, and assess an expedition in one of the discipline areas offered by the Expeditionary Studies curriculum. (Spring). Prerequisites: 6 completed hours of 300 level EXP coursework and enrollment in or completion of EXP435.

EXP475 - Kayak Leadership (3 cr.)

The first of two advanced level sea kayaking courses, EXP475 emphasizes the core competences required of leadership in sea kayaking. Beginning with an analysis of the idea of leadership and relevant learning theories, this course studies individual behavior and motivation in adventure settings, group dynamics, risk management, and specialized skills for adventure leaders. These materials are addressed in advanced kayak conditions and with sea kayak groups. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

EXP476 - Kayak Leadership II (3 cr.)

The culminating sea kayak course in the specialization category of the expeditionary studies major, this course synthesizes expeditionary leadership with pedagogical, facilitation and technical skills for adventure leaders. EXP476 emphasizes the three essential dimensions of kayak adventure leadership. First is facilitation, the broad base of techniques necessary to maximize effective teaching in pursuit of both individual and group goals. Second are "metaskills," specialized skills necessary for the effective delivery of other skills. Lastly are the advanced paddling skills necessary for kayak leadership. As in all Expeditionary Studies courses, these will be practiced in advanced paddling situations and in actual instructional settings. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

EXP480 - Rock Climbing Leadership (3 cr.)

The first of two advanced-level rock climbing courses, EXP480 emphasizes the core competencies required of leadership in rock climbing. Beginning with an analysis of the idea of leadership and relevant learning theories, this course studies individual behavior and motivation in adventure settings, group dynamics, risk management, and specialized skills for adventure leaders. These materials are addressed in advanced rock climbing settings and with rock climbing groups. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

EXP481 - Rock Climbing Leadership II (3 cr.)

The culminating rock climbing course in the specialization category of the expeditionary studies major, this course synthesizes expeditionary leadership with pedagogical, facilitation and technical skills for adventure leaders. EXP481 emphasizes the three essential dimensions of rock climbing adventure leadership. First is facilitation, the broad base of techniques necessary to maximize effective teaching in pursuit of both individual and group goals. Second are "metaskills," specialized skills necessary for the effective delivery of other skills. Lastly are the advanced rock climbing skills necessary for rock climbing. As in all Expeditionary Studies courses, these will be presented in advanced rock climbing situations and in actual instruction settings. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

EXP484 - Ice Climbing Leadership (3 cr.)

The culminating ice climbing course in the specialization category of the expeditionary studies major, this course synthesizes expeditionary leadership with pedagogical, facilitation and technical skills for adventure leaders. EXP484 emphasizes the three essential dimensions of ice climbing leadership. First is facilitation, the broad base of techniques necessary to maximize effective teaching in pursuit of both individual and group goals. Second are meta-skills, specialized skills necessary for the effective delivery of other skills. Lastly are the advanced ice climbing skills necessary for ice climbing leadership. As in all Expeditionary Studies courses, these will be presented in advanced ice climbing situations and in actual instructional settings. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: EXP480; POI.

EXP487 - Backcountry Skiing Leadership (3 cr.)

The culminating backcountry ski course in the specialization category of the expeditionary studies major, this course synthesizes expeditionary leadership with pedagogy, facilitation, and specialized skills for adventure leaders. EXP487 emphasizes the three essential dimensions of backcountry skiing adventure leadership. First is facilitation, the broad base of techniques necessary to maximize effective teaching in pursuit of both individual and group goals. Second are "metaskills," specialized skills necessary for the effective delivery of other skills. Lastly are the advanced skiing skills necessary for leadership. As in all Expeditionary Studies courses, these will be presented in advanced backcountry ski settings and in actual instruction settings. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

EXP496 - Instructional Field Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Supervised tutoring or instructional assistance in field settings in Expeditionary Studies courses. A contract specifying each student's duties, approved by the course coordinator, will be on file in the department. Can be repeated to a maximum of six credits. (Spring/Fall). Prerequisite: POI.

EXP498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

The Adirondack Experience provides a variety of field experiences in professional settings to qualified students. Students selecting an Expeditionary Studies internship will participate at selected sites under the supervision of professional staff persons. These sites might include guide services, outdoor businesses, camps, adventure based counseling programs, and The Adirondack Experience program itself. May be repeated for up to a maximum of fifteen (15) credits. (Summer - Spring). Liberal arts.

EXP499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall - Spring).

EXP536 - Community Service Expedition (3 cr.)

EXP536 course is one of three required expeditions in the master's degree in expeditionary studies, combining the skills and thinking of the expeditionary process into a student planned and led expedition, here with a community service goal. In addition to completion of an approved expedition, students must submit an expedition proposal and a public presentation as components of the expedition process. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: completion of three credit hours of EXP "Praxis" coursework.

EXP537 - Educational Expedition (3 to 6 cr.)

EXP537 is one of three required expeditions in the master's degree in expeditionary studies, combining the skills and thinking of the expeditionary process into a student planned and led expedition, here with an educational goal. EXP537 requires submission of an expedition proposal and a public presentation as components of the expedition process. To fill the "Expedition" category requirements in the MS in expeditionary studies, students must take EXP537 or EXP538 for six credit hours. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: completion of three credit hours of expeditionary studies "Praxis" coursework.

EXP538 - Professional Expedition (3 to 6 cr.)

EXP 538 is one of three required expeditions in the master's degree in expeditionary studies, combining the skills and thinking of the expeditionary process into a student planned and led expedition, here with a professional goal. EXP538 requires submission of an expedition proposal and a public presentation as components of the expedition process. To fill the "Expedition" category requirements in the MS in expeditionary studies, students must take EXP537 or EXP538 for six credits. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: completion of three credit hours of expeditionary studies "Praxis" coursework.

EXP550 - Self-Assessment for Adventure Sports Practitioners (1 cr.)

EXP550 offers expeditionary studies graduate students a method to self-identify the physiological, psychological, technical, and tactical (PPTT) principles necessary for self-growth as adventure practitioners. This online course requires a self-assessment of one's own technical abilities and design of a plan for improving them. This will be constructed with the expeditionary studies graduate program curriculum as its context. (Fall/Spring).

EXP560 - Planning Adventure Journeys (3 cr.)

EXP560 considers the entire planning process for adventure travel to remote settings, from identifying the components necessary for successful adventure journeys to client, student, and participant care. Relevant to all levels of adventure travel, the planning process is an explicit, fore-grounded approach to adventure travel. As "thinking in action" defines expeditionary adventures, "thinking before action" defines expeditionary planning. Students in this online class will develop adventure plans for short, medium, and long distance travel for varied group goals and abilities. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: completion of or co-registration with EXP550.

EXP570 - Adventure Sports Pedagogy (3 cr.)

EXP570 integrates the "How", the "Why", and the "What" of adventure sports pedagogy into a transferrable set of ideas appropriate for all adventure sports. Using examples from various adventure sports disciplines, this online course combines instructional theory, practical approaches, and developmental goals into a unified process for teaching adventure sports. Students will be responsible for creating a variety of teaching modules. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: completion of or co-registration with EXP550.

EXP577 - Guiding Field Practicum (3 to 6 cr.)

EXP577 is one of two supervised field experiences; here the emphasis is on guiding, including addressing aspects of planning, implementing risk management protocols, and designing appropriate outcomes for specific group needs. All materials must be submitted and reviewed in advance. Students enrolled in this class must arrange their schedules to be present for specified off-campus travel. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: completion of EXP550 and six credit hours of expeditionary studies "theory" coursework.

EXP580 - Risk Management (3 cr.)

EXP580 offers an overview of risk management, beginning with an understanding of risk in both historical and contemporary terms. The study is framed by ethical, professional, and legal points of view. As an overarching way of mitigating potential incidents, EXP580 understands risk management as a central component of expeditionary thinking. This online class culminates with the development of an in-depth risk management plan. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: completion of or co-registration with EXP550.

EXP585 - Outcomes-Based Adventure Programming (3 cr.)

EXP585 addresses diverse and possible outcomes for adventure-based programming. These include programming for personal growth, team building, counseling, leadership, and for so-called "hard skill" development. Each outcome requires distinct structures, pedagogies, backgrounds and training. EXP585 explores these variations as well as other implicit and explicit assumptions attached to these outcomes. In this online course, students will develop curriculum and class modules for outcomes-based programming related to their professional goals. (Spring). Prerequisite: completion of or co-registration with EXP550.

EXP590 - Adventure Leadership (3 cr.)

EXP590 examines leadership as one of the three unifying principles of adventure programming. (Planning and risk management are the other two.) It is designed to help students develop self-efficacy and competence in leadership using adventure recreation as a contextual framework. This online course will focus on specific theoretical and practical leadership skills. (Fall). Prerequisite: completion of or co-registration with EXP550.

EXP595 - Wilderness First Responder (3 cr.)

Beyond first aid skills are medical skills. This course provides students the knowledge to practice basic medical skills in wilderness environments. Topics include patient assessment, splinting, wound care, cold and heat emergencies, burns, pharmacology, and care of the C-Spine, among others, in remote settings. All skills will be practiced in field exercises and mock rescue settings. (Annually).

FIN350 - Financial Planning for Entrepreneurs (3 cr.)

The course provides a foundation for the financial planning and management of a new venture start-up and acquisition. It examines the process of financial forecasting, the practice of effective financial management, sources of finance, bootstrapping strategy, valuation and exit planning. The course content follows the life cycle of a new venture. Topics are discussed in a manner that follows the logical order of the stages of development that entrepreneurs go through in the process of building a start-up and successfully transitioning it into a growing business. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: ECO110 and ACC201.

FIN355 - Principles of Finance (3 cr.)

An introduction to financial concepts and methods used in contemporary corporate financial decision making. Students learn about the various types of business organizations and financial institutions and their role in the economy. Time value of money concepts are used to value stocks and bonds and to evaluate business proposals. The risk-return relation, the cost of capital, capital budgeting techniques, cash flow estimation, and capital structure are explored. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ACC202, either ECO101 or both ECO110 and ECO111; ECO260.

FIN385 - Corporate Financial Management (3 cr.)

The role of the financial manager in the modern corporation is examined with an emphasis on the use of financial statements in the context of financial analysis, forecasting, and financial planning. In addition, the topics of securities issuance and design, dividend policy, working capital management, risk management, and corporate control are examined. The special concerns facing multinational corporations are also explored. (Fall). Prerequisite: FIN355.

FIN390 - Money and Banking (3 cr.)

Evolution of monetary institutions, including the Federal Reserve system, the commercial banking structure and financial intermediaries. Theoretical analysis involving creation of money and its effects on prices, interest rates, and incomes. Additional analysis directed toward international finance. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ECO101 or ECO111.

FIN396 - Money and Capital Markets (3 cr.)

Analysis of financial intermediaries, financial instruments and risk and rate of return. Discussion of stocks, bonds, investment banking, federal funds, commercial paper, treasury securities, repurchase agreements, futures and options, international banking and capital expenditures. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO101 or ECO110; ECO111 and FIN355, or POI.

FIN399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall - Spring).

FIN400 - International Financial Management (3 cr.)

The key issues in international finance are examined. Students will study foreign exchange markets and exchange rates, banking and money markets, debt and equity markets, and portfolio management from an international perspective. Financial management issues including the capital structure decision, cost of capital, capital budgeting, trade finance, foreign direct investment, and cross-border acquisitions are examined from the perspective of a global corporation. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO110, ECO111, FIN355.

FIN401 - Alternative Investments (3 cr.)

The purpose of this course is to provide an understanding of the alternative investments industry. The course covers hedge funds, funds of hedge funds, managed futures, commodities, commodity trading advisors, venture capital, private equity and leveraged buyouts and how they play a role in traditional investment portfolios for downside equity risk management. (Fall). Prerequisite: FIN355.

FIN420 - Portfolio Management Theory (3 cr.)

Asset allocation and investment selection as well as the basics of security markets are studied with an emphasis on the implications of efficient market theory. The uses and limitations of asset pricing models are examined. Techniques employed in the management of investment portfolios and the measurement of portfolio performance are explored. (Spring). Prerequisite: FIN355.

FIN480 - Stock Market Investment and Analysis (3 cr.)

Analysis of private and public securities and other financial investments. Functions of markets, sources of information, portfolio theory, risk analysis and security price formations. (Spring). Prerequisite: FIN355 or POI.

FIN486 - Financial Derivatives (3 cr.)

A study of options, futures, and other financial derivative contracts. The course includes the markets, valuation, and specification of these derivative contracts and their use in corporate financial risk management. (Fall). Prerequisites: FIN355, ECO260.

FIN490 - Senior Seminar in Finance (3 cr.)

Senior level finance students have an opportunity to apply finance theory and financial analysis techniques learned in other finance courses to analyze a real world problem. The focus is on formulation of hypotheses, data gathering, statistical analysis, and preparation of a research thesis. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BUS489 (may be taken concurrently); last semester, senior standing.

FIN499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall - Winter - Spring - Summer).

FLL496 - Foreign Language Methodology (3 cr.)

This course, conducted in a seminar setting, is designed to provide future foreign language teachers with communicative and proficiency-based pedagogical strategies pertaining to middle and high school foreign language classrooms. Although intended primarily for those students completing B.S. Adolescence programs in French and Spanish, foreign language majors meeting the prerequisite requirements may enroll. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: minimum of 12 hours of upper-level Spanish or French language courses.

FNI101 - Introduction to Careers in Nutrition and Dietetics (1 cr.)

Introduction to the profession of nutrition and dietetics, including careers, course preparation and dietetic registration requirements. (Fall/Spring).

FNI191 - Nutrition and Well-Being (3 cr.)

The relationship between food and health considering social, cultural, environmental and physiological factors. (Spring, Summer, Fall & Winter).

FNI199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

FNI211 - Human Nutrition (3 cr.)

Introduction to the science of nutrition, with emphasis on nutrients, their actions, interactions, and balance in relation to health. Consideration given to selection of food to meet nutrient requirements. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CHE101 or equivalent.

FNI241 - Nutrition in the Life Cycle (3 cr.)

Physiological, psychological, sociological and economic factors that influence nutrient requirements, nutritional status and food habits from pre-conception through old age. Course emphasis is normal nutrition throughout the lifecycle and the development of healthy eating habits. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FNI211 (or FNI191 for non-majors).

FNI261 - Organization and Management (3 cr.)

An overview of management theories and practices in foodservice operations, dietetics and community nutrition. Emphasis on application of theories to practice. (Spring). Prerequisite: FNI211 or FNI191.

FNI299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

FNI301 - Nutrition Education and Counseling (4 cr.)

Application of current theories and techniques of counseling and education to the field of nutrition and dietetics. Experiential learning and practical application of instructional procedures, counseling methods, motivational interviewing and behavior change techniques will be a large component of the class. Students will have the opportunity to develop and use resources and materials appropriate for various ages, abilities and situations unique to the field of dietetics and nutrition. (Fall). Prerequisites: FNI211, FNI241, junior status (FNI majors).

FNI350 - Research Methods in Health and Nutrition (3 cr.)

This course is designed to introduce Nutrition students to quantitative research methods in health. It will explore concepts and skills relevant to human and animal study designs, critiquing the literature, developing research questions and data analysis, interpretation, and research ethics. It will also introduce students to current topics in the field of nutrition, to give them an insight into changing recommendations, diet trends and new research. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: FNI211, FNI241, MAT161.

FNI362 - Food Preparation (4 cr.)

Fundamental and scientific principles of food preparation, with emphasis on interpretation of chemical reactions in foods and the development of sound skills in food preparation. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: FNI191 or FNI211.

FNI362L - Food Preparation Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring & Fall).

FNI399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

FNI441 - Community Nutrition (3 cr.)

To provide an overview of community assessments, community nutrition needs, resources, program planning, funding and evaluation. To gain insight into the role of community nutritionist as a program planner. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: FNI211, FNI241.

FNI443 - Food Science (4 cr.)

The research method as applied to the discipline of the science of food. Discussion of the methods behind food manufacturing and food supply perspectives. (Spring). Prerequisites: CHE240, FNI362.

FNI443L - Food Science Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

FNI445 - Advanced Nutrition (4 cr.)

Nutrition with emphasis on integration of biochemical, physiological and cytological aspects. (Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO327, CHE371 (or concurrent enrollment), FNI211.

FNI446 - Medical Nutrition Therapy I (3 cr.)

The biophysical basis for the use of medical nutrition therapy in selected pathological disorders and application of the nutrition care process. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: FNI211, BIO327, CHE371, FNI445 (or concurrent enrollment).

FNI448 - Seminar in Dietetics (3 cr.)

Application of clinical nutrition theory and development of professional materials through writing activities including a major term paper, dietary progress notes, magazine article writing, critiques, and resume writing. This course satisfies the advanced writing requirement for the Nutrition Program. Approved AWR. (Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101, FNI446 or concurrent enrollment.

FNI450 - Foodservice Delivery Management (4 cr.)

Foodservice Delivery Management is the integration of nutrition science, food preparation and management with the practical application of quantity food preparation in a variety of areas. Emphasis is on menu planning, quantity food purchasing and production, delivery systems, sanitation, safety and financial control. Human resources, management and leadership, and marketing will also be discussed. In Lab, students will gain experience and skills in quantity food production from start to finish. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO203, FNI261, FNI362.

FNI450L - Food Service Delivery Management Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

FNI451 - Medical Nutrition Therapy II (3 cr.)

The biophysical basis for the use of medical nutrition therapy in selected pathological disorders and application of the nutrition care process. (Spring). Prerequisites: FNI446, senior standing.

FNI496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 15 cr.)

(Spring & Fall).

FNI499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

FRE111 - Elementary French I (0 to 3 cr.)

Beginning study of French with emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and the cultures of the French-speaking world. Open to students without previous knowledge of French or to those who have had no more than two years of French in high school. (Fall, Winter & Spring). Liberal arts.

FRE112 - Elementary French II (0 to 3 cr.)

Continuation of French I. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE111 or 85 or higher on the Regents Exam or placement by examination.

FRE150 - Intensive French Review (3 cr.)

For students who have successfully completed 2-3 years of French in high school or have placed in this course by examination. A review and expansion of French linguistic structures and cultural studies. French 150 is the equivalent of French 111-112. (Fall - Spring - Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 2-3 years of high-school French, or 85 or higher on the Regents Exam, or placement by exam.

FRE199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Summer).

FRE213 - Intermediate French I (0 to 3 cr.)

Sequel to FRE112 or FRE150. Systematic review and practice of French language skills as well as expansion of cultural studies. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE112, or FRE150 or placement by exam.

FRE214 - Intermediate French II (0 to 3 cr.)

Continuation of FRE213 and preparation for French composition and conversation. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE213, or placement by exam.

FRE299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Summer).

FRE316 - Conversation avancee (3 cr.)

Expansion and improvement of oral expression through readings and discussions on specialized issues. Not for native speakers. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE214, or POI.

FRE319 - Composition et grammaire avancees (3 cr.)

Extensive practice of writing in French, with readings and assignments involving a variety of genres, topics, and styles. Practical analysis of French grammatical structures to develop greater skill in written expression. Approved AWR. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, FRE214 and one of the following courses: FRE316, FRE333, FRE334, FRE335.

FRE322 - Lecture et interpretation (3 cr.)

An introduction to literature in French. Emphasis will be on improving reading speed and proficiency and on developing skills for textual analysis involving a variety of forms and genres. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE214.

FRE333 - La France: Themes Varies (3 cr.)

An introduction to French culture and literature from the earliest times to the present. (May be taken more than once different content). (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE214.

FRE334 - La Francophonie: Themes Varies (3 cr.)

A survey of interdisciplinary issues in the French-speaking world exploring political and monetary institutions, literary, and socio-cultural aesthetics. Focused on such regions as the Maghreb, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Antilles, Europe, Southeast Asia, and North America rather than France and Quebec. (May be taken more than once with different content). (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE214.

FRE335 - Le Quebec (3 cr.)

An overview of the history, culture, and literature of Quebec, involving issues in contemporary art, politics, and the French language in Canada. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts. Prerequisite: FRE214.

FRE341 - French Literature (in English) (3 cr.)

Works of French literature, selected from the Middle Ages to the 21st Century, viewed through both French cultural and international perspectives. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, any literature course.

FRE346 - French Canadian Cultures (3 cr.)

An intensive study of the various French-Canadian cultures with special emphasis on Quebec through an examination of literature in translation and other artistic and aesthetic expressions. Taught in English. Students with sufficient knowledge of French may complete assignments in French. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

FRE348 - French Civilization (in English) (3 cr.)

An introduction to France through its history, culture, and aspects of its literature. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

FRE399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

FRE441 - Etudes Francaises (3 cr.)

The examination of selected topics in advanced French studies. Topics may include historical periods, literary genres; or social, literary or intellectual movements. May be taken more than once with different content. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: FRE322; FRE333 or FRE334 or FRE335 or equivalent competency.

FRE448 - Etudes Francophones (3 cr.)

An examination of selected topics involving film, literary, socio-cultural, and intellectual movements from the diverse cultures that comprise the French-speaking world. (May be taken more than once with different content). (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: FRE322, FRE333, FRE334, FRE335, or equivalent competency.

FRE470 - French and Francophone Interdisciplinary Studies (3 cr.)

An examination of selected topics in French and Francophone Studies, viewed through an interdisciplinary perspective. (May be taken more than once with different content). (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: FRE322; FRE333 or FRE334 or FRE335.

FRE496 - French Foreign Language Methodology (3 cr.)

This course, conducted in a seminar setting, is designed to provide future foreign language teachers with communicative and proficiency-based pedagogical strategies pertaining to middle and high school foreign language classrooms. Although intended primarily for students completing adolescence education programs in French (or the BA/MST Adolescence Education program) French majors and minors meeting the prerequisite requirements may enroll. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: FRE316, FRE319, and two of the following: FRE333, FRE334, FRE335; or 12 credits of upper-division French courses, or by advisement.

FRE497 - French Practicum (3 cr.)

For advanced students in French who will work under faculty supervision. In addition to conducting conversation sessions, students will gain experience in planning classroom activities, preparing materials for classroom use and working with various methodologies. A contract specifying the student's responsibilities will be filed with the department chairperson. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: by faculty invitation only; ACTFL rating of intermediate-high oral skills, minimum; 3.3 GPA (B+ average) in FRE courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

FRE498 - Internship (3 cr.)

For advanced students of French with background in education or business. Involves faculty-supervised field experiences, both on- and off-campus. Contract specifying student's responsibilities, developed in consultation with the student, supervisor, and appropriate faculty advisor(s) will be filed with the department chairperson. (Fall - Spring).

FRE499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

FRE596 - French Methodology Practicum (3 cr.)

Students will learn communicative and proficiency-based pedagogical strategies in a seminar setting and by conducting conversation sessions as part of regular beginning-level French courses under the close supervision of a faculty member. This course is designed for students in the MST program in French and French teachers seeking experience with new methodologies. Advanced undergraduates may enroll by faculty invitation only. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: advanced proficiencies in speaking, listening, reading and writing.

FRE599 - Graduate Independent Study Course in French (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

FRS101 - Freshman Seminar (2 to 3 cr.)

(Fall & Spring). Liberal arts.

FRX100 - Freshmen Experience (1 cr.)

(Fall). Liberal arts.

FRX101 - First Year Student Transition Seminar (1 cr.)

Seminars are available for groups of fifteen students who will work intensively with specially selected faculty mentors and resident assistants. They will meet as a class for one hour each week and spend time exploring out-of-class academic and cultural activities as well, such as concerts, plays, exhibits and lectures. Other topics to be examined include personal growth, global civil issues, academic policies, decision making, developing study skills, developing scholarly perspective and appreciating cultural diversity. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

FRX105 - FACT Facilitating Academic College Transitions (1 cr.)

Through guest speakers, lecture, guided activities, self exploration, and assignments, students will become familiar with major/career exploration processes, decision making processes, available majors/minors, college policies and procedures, degree requirements, the Curriculum Advising and Program Planning (CAPP) report, advisement procedures, registration procedures/practices, communication channels, and administrative services available to assist in the ultimate declaration of a major. (Fall).

FRX401 - Freshman Experience Teaching Apprenticeship (1 cr.)

Available to upper-level students who are selected to facilitate a freshman experience seminar under the supervision of the faculty member coordinating the program. Students will receive advanced/ ongoing training in seminar leadership skills. Students meet a minimum of one contact hour per week with the FRX seminar and an additional minimum of three hours per week in development of a syllabus, planning, organizing, meetings with seminar members individually, attending events required by the seminar, and grading the written work and other performance of freshmen in the seminar. Teaching apprentices will also meet with the faculty supervisor to facilitate the smooth operation of the FRX seminars. May only be taken by permission of the supervisor. Pass/fail grade assigned by the supervisor.

FRX496 - Instructional Practicum (1 cr.)

Assist instructor in planning, preparation, class discussions, tutoring, and/or group projects/presentations. Assist incoming students with acquiring skills and information necessary for successful integration into our campus community. Each student and instructor will complete a contract specifying the student's duties. Students will receive a grade of pass or fail for the course. May be repeated once. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: Grade of B or better in course in which student will work; upper-level class standing or POI.

GEG120 - Introduction to Physical Geography (3 cr.)

The study of natural processes of the earth-environment system and its component subsystems of the atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere. Special focus on real or locational differentiations of naturally occurring phenomena and the physical processes operating to produce such patterns. Technology employed by physical geographers given due attention. The impact of human activities on the natural environment and its processes stressed. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

GEG121 - Human Geography (3 cr.)

Explores the concepts and potential of human geography in the world today. Topics include globalization, agriculture and rural societies, urbanization and placemaking, geographies of economic development, politics of territory and place and environmentalism in the world today. (Fall, Spring & Summer). Liberal arts.

GEG133 - Historical Geography of the U.S. (3 cr.)

The origin and evolution of American culture, society, and cultural landscapes. Spatial organization of the United States from Colonial Days to present. Selected topics and regions analyzed in terms of geographic change through time. Primary topics include natural resource perception and assessment, settlement, population, economic activities, transportation, and urbanization. (Fall).

GEG199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

GEG224 - World Regional Geography (3 cr.)

Introduction to regional geography concepts with emphasis on common and specific issues of non-Western regions in an era of contemporary globalization, including the study of diverse features of history, institutions, economy, society and culture of non-Western civilization. Liberal arts. (Spring).

GEG290 - Global Positioning Systems and Digital Mapping (3 cr.)

Focuses on the use of Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in the field and digital image analysis, especially the interpretation of topographic maps, digital orthophotos, and related applications in Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Strenuous winter or summer field trips are required, so students should be in adequate physical condition. A personal GPS unit is desirable, but not required. (Winter). Liberal arts.

GEG299 - Independent (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GEG301 - Global Planning Principles (3 cr.)

Examination of the global planning principles for environmental, rural and urban development. Critical study of the interrelations among global, national and local planning strategies. (Spring, Winter & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

GEG303 - Environmental Conservation (3 cr.)

Philosophy and principles of the wise use of natural resources (soil, water, forest, rangeland, wildlife, minerals, energy, recreation resources) including their nature, significance and distribution patterns. Natural planning concepts emphasized. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: any introductory course in geography, environmental science, biology, or anthropology.

GEG304 - Economic Geography (3 cr.)

The study of geographical perspectives of the world economy, exploring the economic factors affecting population, production and distribution, locational decisions, human-environment interactions, exchange and consumption of wealth in the global context. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: any 100-level course in GEG or ECO, or ENV201 or POI.

GEG307 - Urban Geography and Planning (3 cr.)

Investigates the geographical dimensions of urbanization and potential of geography for planning. Topics include patterns of global urbanization, city spaces and urban structures, neighborhoods and place identity, as well as urban planning concepts and skills. (Spring). Liberal arts.

GEG308 - Political Geography (3 cr.)

Examines the geographic components of political activity in a global context. Many territorial factors, such as internal and external political organization, boundaries, cultural problems, strategic theory and the Law of the Sea are discussed. Liberal arts.

GEG310 - Geography of the U.S. in Global Perspective (3 cr.)

Cultural, demographic, historical, political, economic, and physical attributes of the United States interpreted from a geographic perspective. An interpretive-descriptive account of distinctive regions created by the interplay of said attributes. America's status and role in global affairs emphasized throughout the course. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

GEG312 - Geography of Russia in Global Perspective (3 cr.)

Cultural, demographic, historical, political, economic, and physical attributes of Russia interpreted from a geographic and transnational perspective. Russia's status, role, and influence in global affairs and a comparative view of critical contemporary issues. The defining characteristics of Russian culture and life compared to those of other major realms of the world are emphasized throughout the course. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: completion of Social Science requirement in General Education.

GEG314 - Geography of Europe (3 cr.)

Europe and its constituent countries and regions are studied geographically. The environmental, economic, social, cultural, political, and past geographies of Europe are identified and analyzed as they combine to create a variety of landscapes. Most of this course emphasizes contemporary Europe, but there is also considerable content devoted to Europe's past geographies. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Any introductory course in Geography or History.

GEG316 - Geography of Canada (3 cr.)

The interplay of historical, political, economic, cultural and environmental factors that make Canada what it is today. Regional identities within Canada are emphasized. The importance of the American influence on Canada, in a geographical context, is also stressed. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts.

GEG317 - Geography of South America (3 cr.)

Physical and cultural geographical survey of South America. The historical background of settlement, social and economic foundations, urbanization and contemporary issues of development are covered. Individual countries of South America examined. (Fall). Liberal arts.

GEG319 - Geography of New York State (3 cr.)

Natural environment and historical development of the State are studied with emphasis placed upon the cultural, economic, resource, recreational, urban, transportational and political patterns that have emerged. (Spring). Liberal arts.

GEG320 - Climatology (3 cr.)

Elements and controls of climate (solar radiation, temperature, wind and pressure systems, moisture and precipitation, air masses and fronts, atmospheric disturbances). World pattern of climate stressed (regional analysis). Field trips. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEG120.

GEG331 - Recreation and Tourism Geography (3 cr.)

Geography of recreation and tourism; examples of uses, abuses and conservation of recreational resources. Nature and distribution of recreation resources. Special emphasis on national parks and other amenity resources. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: any introductory course in geography, environmental science, biology, or anthropology.

GEG332 - Environmental Justice (3 cr.)

Globalization has produced distinct environmental issues and movements throughout the world. This course will compare the global environmental notions and movements that have developed in the North and South as well as within the U.S. It will explore the political ecology of environmental issues and the way in which race, class, and gender have shaped environmentalism within the United States. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG121 or ENV101 or POI.

GEG335 - Geography of Southeast Asia (3 cr.)

The region of Southeast Asia and its countries are studied as a geographical system. The environmental components, including landforms, climates, biography and water sources, and the human geographical elements of the region, including the historical economic, cultural, and political geographies are examined to understand the region's landscapes and changes. The primary focus is on the contemporary patterns of the area, but evolutionary processes of change are also studied. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or POI.

GEG340 - Computer Application in Geography (3 cr.)

Introduction to how technology has changed techniques and methods in geography. Emphasis on spreadsheets and computer graphics, geographic report preparation, image acquisition and use (scanning, digitizing, the internet and World Wide Web), location finding and route planning, field mapping and global positioning systems (GPS), computer mapping, digital mapping, and geographic information systems (GIS). The preparation of geographic reports using these skills will be emphasized. This course is a requirement for geography majors, but will also be valuable for other majors such as geology and environment science. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: basic computer literacy.

GEG345 - The Adirondacks: An Historical Geography (3 cr.)

Evolution of geographic patterns of human endeavors from initial exploration through mid-twentieth century. Settlement, population, transportation, economic activities, ethnicity and cultural landscapes emphasized. Field trips to Great Camps, former mining and mill towns, abandoned farms, mines, cemeteries, resort hotels and the Adirondack Museum at Blue Mountain Lake. (Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior standing

GEG350 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Mapping (3 cr.)

Introduction to geographic information systems (GIS), map design, and ArcView GIS software licensed by Environmental Systems Research Institute. Students will prepare maps and store, retrieve, and analyze spatial data. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisite: GEG120 or GEL101 or POI.

GEG350R - Geographic Information System/Mapping Recitation (0 cr.)

Students registering for GEG350 must register for the corresponding GEG350R recitation section.

GEG360 - Global Field Study (3 to 6 cr.)

This course includes both classroom meetings and field-based study in a foreign country to examine the relations between the global-system and local communities. Topics include globalization, cross-cultural understanding, economic development, environmental issues and political power. Students will learn to critically evaluate responsible citizenship within a global community. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or POI.

GEG370 - Exploring sub-Saharan Africa (3 cr.)

An in-depth geographic study of Africa south of the Sahara Desert. Surveys physical geography, natural resources, history, cultures, demography, political geography, economic activities and current issues of African states south of the Sahara. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

GEG399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

GEG431 - Recreational Land Use Planning (3 cr.)

Planning process; basics and specifics of recreational land use planning. Recreational land use plan will be prepared for sites in Northeastern New York. Field trips. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG303; GEG331 or ENV310.

GEG432 - Environmental Governance (3 cr.)

The course focuses on the social, economic, legal and political structures that shape our interactions with the environment today. It highlights the interrelations with environmental governance at global, national and local levels. Students will learn how to integrate public participation to address the challenges of environmental governance. Approved AWR. (Every other spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG332 or SOC367.

GEG450 - Geography: Themes and Concepts (3 cr.)

The development, major concepts, and approaches to the study of geography are the main foci for this capstone course. Students will also develop their research and writing skills in geography, and will present their work with both oral and written presentations. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing, LIB101 or LIB102 or LIB105 (or corequisite), GEG120, GEG121, and GEG123 or GEG124.

GEG485 - Sustainable Communities (3 cr.)

The class will examine geospatial networks and planning for sustainable communities through case study research. Students will conduct research on sustainability topics such as food systems, mixed land-use design, green jobs, parks and green space, and bicycles and walkability. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEG121 or ENV201 and junior standing.

GEG498 - Practicum in Geography (3 to 12 cr.)

Practical advanced field work under academic supervision. Work with professional groups and agencies such as: Soil Conservation Service, local government and Adirondack Park Agency. Individually arranged between student and faculty sponsor. (Spring & Fall). Prerequisites: advanced standing, POI.

GEG499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

GEG545 - The Adirondacks: An Historical Geography (3 cr.)

Evolution of geographic patterns of human endeavors from initial exploration through mid-twentieth century. Settlement, population, transportation, economic activities, ethnicity, and cultural landscapes emphasized. Field trips to Great Camps; the Adirondack Museum at Blue Mountain Lake; former mill towns, mining camps, and renowned resort-hotel sites; abandoned iron mines; ghost towns; cemeteries; and selected religious sites (Roman Catholic Church/Shrine and historic Beth Joseph Synagogue. (Summer).

GEG599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

GEL101 - Physical Geology (4 cr.)

The study of the composition and structure of Earth's dynamic systems, the interactions between system components and the forces and processes that drive them. The evolution of the Earth, the life it supports, and its surface landscapes are explained. The practices within the context of the scientific method. The interactions between natural Earth processes and human activities and their relationship to modern environmental issues and concerns are examined. Lecture and laboratory. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

GEL101L - Physical Geology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring, Summer & Fall).

GEL102 - Evolution of the Earth (4 cr.)

The study of the geologic history of the earth and its life. Lecture, laboratory and field work. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEL101.

GEL102L - Evolution of the Earth Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

GEL199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring & Fall).

GEL273 - HAZWOPER: Hazardous Waste Operations & Emergency Response (2 cr.)

This course meets the requirements of the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) for hazardous materials operations and emergency response program which are required by both EPA and OSHA. The course leads to a 40-hour HAZWOPER certificate. This certification is a job requirement for many entry-level positions in the area of environmental consulting potentially filled by our programs in both geology and environmental science. (Winter/Summer). Prerequisite: senior standing.

GEL299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GEL305 - Energy and Mineral Resources (3 cr.)

Introduction to energy and mineral resources: coal, oil and natural gas, nuclear, ore and industrial minerals, and alternative sources of power including solar and geothermal energy. Environmental impact of exploration, pollution and global changes associated with developing and using different resources. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEL101.

GEL306 - Atmospheric Processes (3 cr.)

An introduction to atmospheric processes including energy transfer and interactions, condensation and precipitation, atmospheric circulation, climate and climatic change. Emphasis will be placed upon how the atmosphere impacts various world ecosystems. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENV101 or GEL101.

GEL307 - Geochemistry (3 cr.)

Origin of the elements and chemical differentiation of the Earth. Isotope geochemistry and geochronology including both radiogenic and stable isotope systems. Applications of geochemistry to the solution of global environmental problems such as radioactive waste disposal. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CHE112 and GEL101.

GEL310 - Mineralogy/Optical Mineralogy (4 cr.)

Introduction to the major concepts of mineralogy and optical mineralogy. Topics include mineral systems, hand specimen and optical identification of minerals, crystallography, crystal chemistry and X-ray diffraction analysis. Laboratory exercises include identification of major minerals in hand specimen and with the petrographic and binocular microscopes. (Fall). Liberal arts. Corequisite: CHE101 or CHE111. Prerequisite: GEL101.

GEL310L - Mineralogy Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

GEL323 - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology (4 cr.)

An in-depth study of igneous and metamorphic rocks including petrographic examination of characteristic rock textures and mineralogy. Discussion of each rock group includes their mineralogy, chemistry and processes of formation as related to plate tectonics. Laboratory exercises emphasize identification of rock types in hand specimen, in thin section and in the field. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEL310.

GEL323L - Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

GEL324 - Sedimentology (4 cr.)

Origins, transportation, deposition and classification of sediments. Weathering, elastic textures, evaporite and redbed chemistry, clay mineralogy, carbonate textures and composition, depositional environments, and post-depositional features and the physics of sediment transport, cohesion and flow phenomena. Mechanical, physical and X-ray analysis of sediments and sedimentary structures. Approved AWR. (Spring & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEL310.

GEL324L - Sedimentology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring & Fall).

GEL335 - Extinction (3 cr.)

Discussion of the Biodiversity Crisis and the Concept of the Minimum Viable Population in light of both human induced and natural biological and physical causes for extinction. Survey of the process of extinction ranging from recent extinctions of individual species to mass extinction events in the fossil record. Examines the controversies over the importance of these forcing mechanisms on a global scale and as models for human induced disturbance of the biosphere. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: an introductory course in Biology, Environmental Science, or Geology.

GEL341 - Geomorphic Processes (4 cr.)

The study of landforms, landscapes and their relationship to surface and internal Earth processes, underlying geological structures and the history of geological changes. Lecture/Lab. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEL101.

GEL343 - Hydrology (4 cr.)

Studies the hydrologic cycle and the physical basis of surface hydrology, infiltration, precipitation, snow hydrology, evaporation and stream hydrology. Develops basic principles in fluid mechanics and energy gradients related to infiltration and stream flow. Lecture and laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GEL101 and (PHY101 or PHY111 or CHE101 or CHE111).

GEL343L - Hydrology Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring & Fall).

GEL346 - Environmental Geotechnology (4 cr.)

Investigates the interrelationships between Earth processes, ecosystems and human society and the application of geological principles to environmental problems. Topics include natural geological hazards, such as earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, and floods, and an introduction to geotechnical and hydraulic engineering and environmental issues related to human use and exploitation of Earth resources, such as global climate change, soil and water contamination and land-use planning. Lecture/Lab. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEL101.

GEL391 - Physical Oceanography and Limnology (3 cr.)

An introduction to the chemical and physical processes that influence oceans and lakes. Course topics include currents, waves, tides, coastal processes, temperature structure, light, and sound processes in oceans and lakes. Course topics will be used to analyze the transport and fate of water pollutants, development of ecological settings, and the role of lakes and oceans in the climate system. Course concepts will be actively applied to Lake Champlain. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: GEL101 and (CHE101 or CHE111 or PHY103 or PHY111).

GEL399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

GEL406 - Climate Change Science (3 cr.)

An introduction to the science of global climate change. Course topics will include radiative transfer and the Earth's energy balance, influence of Earth system components on the climate system (atmosphere, ocean, biosphere, cryosphere), natural and human drivers of climate change, the detection and prediction of long-term climate trends, and the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: MAT221 or MAT224 or MAT228 or POI.

GEL440 - Geology Seminar (3 cr.)

Seminar discussions on selected topics or contemporary issues in geology. Emphasizes techniques for effective communication through reports, research papers, abstracts, scientific proposals and written and oral presentations for professional and lay audiences. (Spring). Approved AWR. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101, senior standing in Geology or senior standing in Environmental Science or POI, LIB101 (prerequisite or corequisite).

GEL441 - Hydrogeology (3 cr.)

Studies the physical basis of groundwater flow. Develops basic principles of fluid mechanics and flow through porous media. Determination of hydraulic properties of aquifers. Studies water quality and transport processes. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: (GEL341 or GEL343 or GEL346) and (PHY101 or PHY111) and (MAT221 or MAT224).

GEL451 - Field Geology and Structures (4 cr.)

Study of rock deformation in the field and laboratory including the development and classification of folds, faults, and microstructures. Field laboratory exercises include trips to Vermont and the Adirondacks to map and analyze geologic structures. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GEL310 (may be taken concurrently).

GEL451L - Structural Gel I Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

GEL495 - Research (Undergraduate) (1 to 6 cr.)

Laboratory or field research project arranged between the student and sponsoring faculty member. (Spring, Summer & Fall). Liberal arts.

GEL499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer & Fall).

GEL580 - Special Topics in Earth Science Education (1 to 3 cr.)

Selected topics in Earth Science are explored in depth with an emphasis on imparting new skills to adolescence-level teachers and teacher candidates in inquiry-based learning. Formats vary and may include seminars, workshops, courses or special projects. Topics may include selected investigations in paleontology, astronomy and planetary science, hydrogeology and environmental geology, mineralogy or structural geology. (Spring). Prerequisites: GEL 102 and a 300 level Geology course or POI.

GER111 - Elementary German I (0 to 3 cr.)

Beginning study of German with emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and the cultures of the German-speaking world. Open to students without previous knowledge of German or to those who have had no more than two years of German in high school. (Fall). Liberal arts.

GER112 - Elementary German II (0 to 3 cr.)

Continuation of GER111. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GER111, or 85 or higher on the Regents Exam, or placement by exam.

GER199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GER213 - Intermediate German (3 cr.)

Extended practice in speaking, writing, and grammatical analysis, with readings of fiction, drama, poetry, and history to develop a more extensive vocabulary. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GER112, or placement by exam.

GER299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GER315 - Advanced Conversation in German (3 cr.)

Expansion and improvement of oral expression through readings and discussions on issues in the German-speaking world. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: GER213, or placement by exam

GER319 - German Civilization (3 cr.)

Political, historical, cultural, and intellectual development of Germany from the earliest times to the present. Taught in English. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

GER370 - German Literature (in English) (3 cr.)

Analysis and interpretation of literary and philosophical works--in English translation--by authors from Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Focus on literary, cultural, philosophical, and historical themes. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, sophomore standing.

GER399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GER499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GLS101 - Introduction to Global Studies (3 cr.)

An interdisciplinary survey of 21st century global problems and opportunities. The course will address broad themes such as the origins and impacts of globalization, global problems such as conflict and terrorism, global public health and environmental degradation, governance and the challenges of economic growth, equity and sustainable development. These themes and issues will be explored within the context of introductory lessons on the Americas, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. (Fall). Liberal arts.

GLS490 - Senior Seminar in Global Studies (3 cr.)

This is the capstone course for the Global Studies majors. The selected themes will vary from year to year. The course will contain an introduction to the philosophical foundations of social sciences, research methodologies, intensive practice in refining writing skills and an opportunity to use these skills and others to analyze complex global problems and processes. Students will demonstrate their command of the issues through the development of an advanced senior project. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: senior standing in Global Studies major, or POI.

GWS101 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies (3 cr.)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the field of gender and women's studies. Topics include gender socialization, feminism, intersections of gender with race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, body image, reproductive rights, globalization, militarization, war and peace, men and masculinities, violence against women and struggles for gender equality and social justice. (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

GWS104 - Sexuality, Power and Relationships (1 cr.)

Analysis of healthy and unhealthy relationships in general with special attention to college life. Study of basic theories about sexual assault and gendered violence. Role plays and simulations to raise awareness and build confidence and practical skills for violence prevention and intervention on campus. Introduction to key resources for violence prevention and intervention on campus and in the community. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

GWS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GWS200 - Topics in Gender and Women's Studies (1 to 3 cr.)

Special topics, which may vary with offering, on women and gender. Topics may be biographical (Stanton & Anthony), thematic (women and the Constitution), methodological (material culture), or experiential (Women's Self Defense). (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts.

GWS204 - Women of Color in U.S. Society (3 cr.)

Historical and contemporary issues affecting African-, Asian-, Latina- and Native American women in the U.S. Special attention to the ways in which racism and sexism work together to challenge women's lives and to the ways in which women of color resist oppression and celebrate their many identities. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts.

GWS240 - Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Film (3 cr.)

An introduction to the representation of gender and sexuality in films of Spain and Spanish speaking Latin America. Liberal arts. (Fall).

GWS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GWS300 - Advanced Topics in Gender and Women's Studies (1 to 7 cr.)

The course will provide faculty and students with opportunities to explore topics, issues, or themes in women's studies that are not emphasized in standard course offerings. Examples: "Women in the Bible," "Gender and Science," "Gender in the Elementary Classroom," "Women Pulitzer Prize Winners," "Gender and Sexuality." (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 (plus other prerequisites to be determined by course content).

GWS301 - Global Gender Issues (3 cr.)

A cross-cultural study of gender issues affecting the lives of women and men around the globe. Critical examination of the specific historical, political, and socioeconomic conditions that shape people's identities and experiences and struggles for gender equality and social justice. Analysis of patterns of continuity and change and similarities and differences among women and men. Topics include women's human rights, human trafficking, gendered aspects of globalization, gender and religion, gender and development, gendered dimensions of environmental issues and sustainability and gender, war and peace. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: upper level standing and one of the following: PSY101, SOC101, HIS101, HIS102, ANT102, GWS101, or POI

GWS302 - Feminist Theory (3 cr.)

An in-depth study of the development and expansion of feminist theory. Critical examination of multiple definitions of feminism, debates in feminist scholarship, and conflicts within the feminist movement. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: restricted to gender and women's studies majors and minors.

GWS310 - Women in Afghanistan: Tradition, Politics, and Religion (3 cr.)

This course is intended to provide an introduction for students into Afghan women's perspectives on their lives and the future of their country. The course will provide students with a better understanding of the challenges Afghan women are facing and will help students explore the self-generated transformation of women's roles in Afghan society. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: GWS101 or ANT102 or SOC101 or HIS132 or POI.

GWS315 - Women and the Law (3 cr.)

Law as it relates to women in the U.S. The ways women and the feminist movement have affected the law, in addition to the influences the law has in each of our lives. Examines such issues as employment opportunity, educational access, domestic violence, reproductive rights, child custody and support, divorce, sexual assault, sexual harassment and pornography. How laws are made and changed, how legal arguments are constructed, and how social movements and individuals can influence our laws. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS 101 and/or upper-division standing.

GWS319 - Women and Popular Culture (3 cr.)

Study of popular cultural artifacts, events, and practices about and by women as they both mirror and transform ideas about women. Emphasis on feminist and cultural studies strategies to interpret cultural products (such as toys, advertisements, TV shows, movies, magazines, athletics, the internet, etc.) as they reflect and affect women. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts . Prerequisites: GWS101 or SOC101 or HIS101 or HIS102 or ANT102 or CMM118 or POI.

GWS340 - Gender and Religion (3 cr.)

Investigation of the impact of religious beliefs on gender issues and their manifestation in human social and political experience. Critical examination of the early emergence of the interplay between gender role ideologies and religious mythology from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. Analysis of such contemporary religious traditions as Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism and Buddhism. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or one of the following: PSY101, SOC101, HIS101, ANT102 or POI.

GWS345 - Gendered Violence and Peer Education (3 cr.)

Advanced training to prepare students to work as peer educators on campus and in the broader community with a particular emphasis on educating the community about gendered violence and ways to address and prevent it. During the course students will serve as peer educators for GWS104 Sexuality, Power, and Relationships. Liberal Arts. (Every Semester). Prerequisites: GWS104, GWS major or minor status, and POI.

GWS346 - Feminist Theater (3 cr.)

Exploration of theater as a forum for women's voices in community. Reading, critical analysis, and performance of existing ensemble of feminist texts and creation and performance of original work. (Annually). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or one of the following: GWS301, PSY101, SOC101, THE106, THE110, MUS115.

GWS348 - Gender and Human Rights (3 cr.)

An examination of human rights discourses, laws, and activism in a global perspective that includes the Unites States. Analysis of how human rights are gendered through readings from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives on femininity, masculinity, and sexuality. Study of how nation-states, the United Nations, human rights organizations, and grassroots activists respond to human rights violations. Focus on social and economic rights (work, family, and healthcare), political rights (voting, property ownership, and civil liberties) and such topics as female genital cutting, infanticide, trafficking, reproduction, HIV/AIDS, genocide, torture, refugees, and the treatment of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender (GLBT) people. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or GWS301 or one of the following: PSY101, SOC101, HIS101, ANT102, or POI.

GWS350 - Gender and Science (3 cr.)

A feminist examination of the lives of women scientists and their under-representation in science, math, and technology. Emphasis on intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality and politics in historical and contemporary scientific practices. Analysis of the impact of women's marginalization and the exclusion of gender issues on the quality and use of scientific research. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or one of the following; GWS301, PSY101, SOC101, HIS102, ANT102, BIO100, BIO102, BIO103, AST102, CHE103, ENV101, MAT101 or POI.

GWS360 - Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) Studies (3 cr.)

An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer lives, social movements, and issues in the United States and globally, including historical overview, debates about causes of sexuality and sexual orientation, impact of legal and social institutions, and the arts in LGBTQ communities. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: one of the following: GWS101, ANT102, HIS101, HIS102, PSY101, SOC101, NUR313, SWK305, or POI.

GWS375 - Gender in Education: Global Perspectives (3 cr.)

Exploration of theories and experiences of gender construction in educational landscapes. Analysis of intersecting dynamics of race, gender, class and religion. Focus on personal, group and policy narratives and multiple perspectives on contemporary issues related to gender and education within and across cultures and contexts. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or one of the following: GWS301, EDU118, EDU120, EDU130, PSY101, HIS101, ANT102, SOC101 or POI.

GWS380 - Men and Masculinities (3 cr.)

A study of the interdisciplinary literature on men and masculinities. Critical examination of masculinity as a social construct and of the diverse experiences of boys and men in different domains and relationships. Analysis of dominant and alternative conceptions and displays of masculinity across cultures and contexts. (Fall/Winter). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or one of the following PSY101, SOC101, HIS101, ANT102, or POI.

GWS385 - Women, Gender, and Sexualities in India (3 cr.)

An interdisciplinary introduction to women and gender issues in India with reference to historical and regional contexts. Emphasis on intersections of gender, sexuality, religion, place, caste and class in contemporary society. Feminist analysis of social and discursive practices involving concepts of modernity, nation and development in multiple contexts, including film, youth culture, non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and conflict zones. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: GWS101 or SOC101 or HIS102 or ANT102 or POI.

GWS386 - Transnational Queer Film (3 cr.)

Examination of films dealing with sexuality, sexual orientation and gay, lesbian, bisexual and transsexual (GLBT) identities and struggles. Comparative study of queer discourses representations and GLBT struggles for rights and recognition around the world. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or one of the following; GWS301, PSY101, SOC101, HIS102, ANT102, or POI.

GWS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

GWS425 - Gender and Crisis: Feminist Perspectives on Trauma and Healing (3 cr.)

Examination of feminist therapy as it applies to the effects of trauma on individual and communities. Study of the characteristics of a crisis or a traumatic event as well as of crisis responders. Integration of multiple approaches including the role of "silence" as a reaction to traumatic events. This course relies heavily on class interactions, team work and vignettes. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101 or one of the following: GWS301, PSY101, SOC101, HIS101, ANT102, or POI.

GWS455 - Feminist Studies: Integration and Application (3 cr.)

Integration of knowledge and experiences acquired during coursework in gender and women's studies. In-depth analysis of feminist theory, research, struggles for gender justice, and the historical and sociopolitical context within which they unfold. Design and implementation of a feminist research or activist project. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: gender and women's studies major or gender and women's studies minor, GWS302.

GWS480 - Perspectives on Feminist Travel (3 cr.)

Advanced study of gender and women's issues and movements outside the United States. Preparation for feminist travel through readings about gender, feminisms, the politics of travel and particular destinations. Feminist travel experiences typically consist of participation in a conference relevant to Women's Studies and a structured study trip, which examines the interplay among gender, culture, and politics in a particular country or region and in comparative perspective. Liberal arts. (Winter/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: GWS101 or GWS301 or PSY101 or SOC101 or HIS102 or ANT102 or POI.

GWS496 - Teaching Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

In depth study of interdisciplinary themes and pedagogical styles in women's studies as a teaching assistant. Supervised practice in oral presentation, discussion facilitation, individual tutoring, and supportive critical analysis of student work. May be repeated once for credit. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: GWS101, POI.

GWS497 - Women's Studies Internship Seminar (3 cr.)

Students will critically evaluate their internship experiences in the context of feminist scholarship. Issues will include the place of women in society, opportunities for and impediments to change, intersections of gender, race, and class, the ethics of applied research and activism. To be taken concurrently with WMS498. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisites: WMS101, WMS201, POI.

GWS498 - Internship (2 to 9 cr.)

Students and instructor will arrange placements in organizations providing services to or advocacy for women: health care, equal rights, rape crisis, battered women shelters, etc. Interns will provide assistance to the agency using their academic training in women's studies as a resource. Must be taken concurrently with WMS497. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisites: WMS101, WMS201, POI.

GWS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

GWS599 - Independent Study (1 to 12 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

HDF111 - Introduction to Human Development and Family Relations (3 cr.)

Exploration of professional preparation, work activities, and consumer populations in the fields of human development and family relations, including child care management, adolescence, and adult development and aging. (Fall & Spring). Prerequisite: 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF211 - Child Development (4 cr.)

An introduction to the development of children from conception to adolescence incorporating theories of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development. Utilizes a laboratory experience to learn to observe without judging and to apply theories from text/class to children. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101, SOC101, 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF212 - Observation in Child Development (1 cr.)

An observation experience in a structured preschool setting. Required of majors who receive transfer credit for a child development course which lacks laboratory component. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: transfer HDF student status, credited for course in child development without an observation component, 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF261 - Introduction to Human Services (3 cr.)

Theoretical concepts, analytic tools and social processes pertaining to human service organizations. Understanding how organizations constrain or facilitate direct practice. Focus on learning human services mode of discourse through writing. (Fall/Spring). Approved AWR. Prerequisites: ENG101, SOC101, PSY101, LIB105; HDF major; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF301 - Planning Programs for Infants and Toddlers (4 cr.)

Integrating knowledge with skills to design, implement, and evaluate programs for infants and toddlers. Focusing on learning environments, appropriate learning experiences and methods of developmental stimulation. The role of the caregiver and relevant issues such as early intervention, health and safety standards and parent involvement will be examined. Supervised practicum experience will be required. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HDF211; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF309 - Understanding Death, Dying, and Bereavement in Human Development (3 cr.)

Overview of attitudes toward death, dying, and bereavement in our society and others. The reality and effects of death throughout the lifespan. Comparison of interdisciplinary influences on our understanding. The role of the human service professional in working with individuals and families affected by death, dying, and the bereavement process. (Fall). Prerequisites: PSY101, SOC101.

HDF311 - Family in Contemporary Society (3 cr.)

Studies the American family in an historical, sociological, and cultural context, with exploration of the latest trends in mating, family constellations, family arrangements, issues, and problems. Includes an interactive experience through the Domestic Violence program as well as a field experience serving low income families. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101, PSY101, 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF312 - Families in Global Perspective (3 cr.)

This course will expand students' knowledge and understanding of the primary socializer-the family-in cultures across the globe. We will look at differences in gender roles, marriage, parenting, taking care of the elderly, and other issues relevant to families. Students will engage in comparative studies of not only the U.S., but with other cultures. For example, how is globalization changing the dynamics of families in developing countries? Because students will be primarily assigned to one culture, they have the ability to become immersed in that culture rather than just having a cursory look at multiple cultures. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101; SOC101; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF314 - Mental Health Issues in Human Services (3 cr.)

Overview of mental health issues, including the meaning of common classifications, policy issues as well as the effect of the community response on the individual with mental disorder. The role of the human service professional in working with individuals and families affected by mental disorders. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101, SOC101, 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF332 - Socialization of Children in the Community (3 cr.)

Explores an aspect of human development in which children are socialized by their families, peers, school, and community. Utilizes the Ecological Systems Approach of Urie Bronfenbrenner. The student will learn to apply the theory to the community through the use of speakers and field trips. There will be an emphasis on scholarly research and critical analysis of readings and an understanding of multicultural differences in socialization. A community experience of serving low income consumers will be required.(Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HDF211, SOC101, 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF334 - Theoretical Foundations of Child Care (3 cr.)

This course explores the historical, theoretical, and philosophical foundations of early childhood programs. It also examines specific curriculum models and instructional strategies with an emphasis on inclusion within developmentally appropriate practice. Current issues and research in the field of early childhood education will be investigated. (Fall). Prerequisite: HDF211 (may be taken concurrently), 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF381 - Perspectives on Parenting (3 cr.)

Parenting techniques as viewed from various theoretical and philosophical perspectives. The effects of such techniques on the child's emotional, social, cognitive and personality development. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF385 - Curriculum Development for Preschoolers (4 cr.)

Integrating knowledge with skills to design, implement, and evaluate programs for children, ages three to five years old. Focus will be on supporting active learning, following developmentally appropriate practices, including children with special needs, and involving families. Supervised practicum experience will be required. (Fall). Prerequisites: HDF211 and 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF401 - Administering a Child Care Facility (3 cr.)

Principles and theories of developing and administering child care facilities, including needs assessment, operational planning and procedures, and administration. Supervised field placement required. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HDF211 and 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF403 - Field Work in Human Development and Family Relations (12 cr.)

Supervised full-time field experience for Human Development and Family Relations majors; a minimum of 14 weeks of full-time participation in selected agencies/programs which deliver human services to the community. Corequisite: HDF404. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF404 - Seminar in Human Development and Family Relations (3 cr.)

Studies the major concepts and professional issues related to the delivery of human services. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HDF403. Prerequisites: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF405 - Field Work in Child Care Management (12 cr.)

Supervised full-time filed experience for Human Development & Family Relations majors in the Child Care Management option; a minimum of 14 weeks of full-time participation in licensed day care facilities or agencies offering services to young children and their families. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HDF406. Prerequisite: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF406 - Seminar in Child Care Management (3 cr.)

Studies the major concepts and professional issues related to the delivery and management of child care and day care facilities. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HDF405. Prerequisites: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF407 - Field Work in Adult Development and Aging (12 cr.)

Supervised full-time field experience for Human Development and Family Relations majors in the Adult Development and Aging option; a minimum of 14 weeks of full-time participation in agencies offering services to the elderly. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HDF408. Prerequisites: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF408 - Seminar in Adult Development and Aging (3 cr.)

Studies the major concepts and professional issues related to the delivery of human services to the elderly. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HDF407. Prerequisites: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA..

HDF409 - Field Work in Adolescence (12 cr.)

Supervised full-time field experience for Human Development Relations majors in the Adolescence option; a minimum of 14 weeks of full-time participation in agencies offering services to adolescents and their families. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HDF410. Prerequisites: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF410 - Seminar in Adolescence (3 cr.)

Studies the major concepts and professional issues related to the delivery of human services to adolescents. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HDF409. Prerequisites: senior standing; HDF major; completion of professional courses; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF411 - Applied Child Care Administration (3 cr.)

Applied principles and theories of administering child care programs and facilities including fiscal and personnel management, marketing and publicity, and program evaluation. Supervised field placement required. (Spring). Prerequisites: HDF401; 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF420 - Adult Development and Aging (4 cr.)

Explores the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial aspects of the period in human development known as aging. Discusses functional and dysfunctional elements of aging with examination of such topics as health care, retirement, family support, long term planning, losses, status, and death. Utilizes a field component in which to apply theories. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HDF211, 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF421 - Adolescence and Society (3 cr.)

Introduce and familiarize students with the period of human development known as adolescence. It enables not only an understanding of the physical, cognitive, and psychosocial components of development, but how adolescents are reciprocally socialized by their interactions with their families, peers, school, and community. Scholarly research on aspects of interest to the student, and development of critical thinking skills will be emphasized as well as awareness of multicultural differences. A community experience in the middle school will facilitate application of theory to the field. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HDF211, 2.5 cumulative GPA.

HDF422 - Field Experience in Adolescence (1 cr.)

Continuation of field experience begun in the previous semester. It expands an understanding of the physical, cognitive and psychosocial components of development in adolescence. Prerequisites: HDF421, 2.3 cumulative GPA, POI

HED199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HED299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HED310 - Foundations of Personal Health (3 cr.)

This course will provide basic health information and surveys health issues in society. It considers health within the context of human development and is designed to acquaint students with understandings, attitudes, and practices that contribute to healthy lifestyles. It considers universal health concerns and addresses issues unique to diverse populations. Emphasis is on personal responsibility for health as a cornerstone of society. Further, it encourages students to recognize health as a dynamic field and fosters critical thinking essential to health. This course also fulfills the state requirements for substance abuse, child abuse, and safe schools. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

HED311 - Health in Contemporary Society (3 cr.)

A comparison of the factors that affect the well-being of the people of the world. Emphasis on the diversity of health achievement, influence of demographic trends, resource management, poverty, social change, public policy and international cooperation. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HED399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HED430 - Critical Health Problems (3 cr.)

Exploration of society's critical and current health issues. Theories and factual data relevant to identified domestic and global health problems. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HED310.

HED460 - Death Education (3 cr.)

A study of the nature of death, dying, and bereavement. Emphasis on cultural difference in attitudes and practices. Legal and ethical issues are considered, and the role of the family and professional care providers explored. (Summer).

HED487 - Child Abuse and Neglect (3 cr.)

A study of the broad ramifications including case finding, intervention and therapeutic measures, epidemiology, prevention and legal aspects of community programs. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

HED499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HED530 - Critical Health Problems (3 cr.)

Exploration of society's critical and current health issues. Theories and factual data relevant to identified domestic and global health problems. (Fall/Spring).

HED587 - Child Abuse and Neglect (3 cr.)

Child abuse and neglect ramifications to include case finding, intervention and therapeutic measures, epidemiology, prevention and legal aspects of community programs. (Fall/Spring).

HED599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS101 - United States Civilization to 1877 (3 cr.)

Development of the American civilization we know today. Political, economic, social and cultural life of the American people from the first European settlements through Reconstruction. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS102 - United States Civilization Since 1877 (3 cr.)

This course examines such topics as Reconstruction, industrialization and urbanization in the late nineteenth century, creation of the American empire, intermittent reform movements, social and cultural movements, and wars and economic cycles in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

HIS121 - European Civilization to 1815 (3 cr.)

Social, political, economic and cultural events from the late Medieval period to the fall of Napoleon. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS122 - European Civilization Since 1815 (3 cr.)

This course examines the social, political, economic and cultural events from the fall of Napoleon to the present. Recent historical currents and traditions from European affairs, especially those which characterize modern life. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS132 - Modern Global History (3 cr.)

This course draws from the tradition of global, regional, and comparative history and exposes students to history from the macro-level. The course examines the social, cultural, political, and economic processes that connect and divide humanity starting roughly at 1300. The course takes significant account of European colonization of the Americas, the industrial revolution, and the expansion of European empire. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS161 - Colonial Latin America, 1492-1825 (3 cr.)

Colonial period of Latin America: existing Amerindian societies, the European Conquest, breakdown of conquest society, the emergence of colonial society, the Bourbon attempt to transform colonial society, and breakup of the Spanish and Portuguese empires. (Fall).Liberal arts.

HIS162 - Middle and Modern Latin America (3 cr.)

In tracing the rise and development of two distinct societies in Latin America--those of the Middle Period and Modern Era--the course examines three longstanding, intertwining conflicts that dominated the struggle over direction in the historical evolution of these nations after independence: 1) the beneficiaries of political power and economic resources (hierarchy vs. egalitarianism); 2) the geographic scale upon which those social interests were best served (regional vs. national); 3) the cultural expressions (reflecting values, attitudes, and behavior) to embody, interpret, and affirm the larger society and the common good. (Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS171 - History of Canada to the 1860s (3 cr.)

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting Canadian history to the 1860s. (Fall). Liberal arts.

HIS172 - History of Canada from the 1860s (3 cr.)

Surveys the social, cultural, economic and political factors affecting Canadian history from the 1860s to the present. (Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS173 - History of the French in North America (3 cr.)

This course examines the history of French speakers in North America from the colonial period to the contemporary era. It offers a continental perspective that encompasses Quebec, the Northeastern United States, Louisiana, and Northwestern Canada. The course will consider how historical events have shaped and given expression to the various forms of contemporary Francophone culture in North America. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS181 - East Asian Civilization (3 cr.)

Survey of East Asian history and culture. Topics include Confucianism, Buddhism, the Japanese Samurai, the Mongol empire, the war in Vietnam and the Rise of the Pacific Rim. Examines Chinese emperors inside the Forbidden City and commoners in the villages and markets of the East Asian countryside. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

HIS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS285 - Historical Practices (3 cr.)

A broad introduction to the discipline of history, focusing on its principle concepts, problems, and questions, including: the perspectives of time and space in human experience; the individual and history; historical phenomenon (i.e., revolution, conquest, golden age); and historical causes and their relation to other disciplines. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts. Prerequisites: history majors or minors (others see chairperson for permission); sophomore standing.

HIS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS300 - Topics in History (1 to 3 cr.)

Various topics are treated historically by examination of primary and secondary materials. Examples may include a focus on biography, on a special theme, on comparative history, or on methodological approaches. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.Prerequisite: any 100 level HIS course or POI.

HIS303 - History of the American Woman (3 cr.)

A survey of the history of American women focusing on the significance of gender identity in determining women's experiences. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

HIS306 - History of New York State (3 cr.)

Political, social and economic development of New York from early settlement to modern times. Show how New York became the Empire State, and the part it has played in the nation's development. Local history receives emphasis. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of American history.

HIS307 - U.S. Foreign Policy 1776-Present (3 cr.)

The development of U.S. foreign policy from the Revolution to the present. Topics include nationalism, wars and interventionism expansionism, superpower competition, and the interrelationship between foreign and domestic affairs. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of U.S. history.

HIS308 - Cold War-Vietnam (3 cr.)

The development of U.S. foreign policy since World War II. Topics include the Cold War, Korean and Vietnam wars, military interventionism, corporate expansionism, the nuclear arms race, and the domestic context of foreign policy. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of history.

HIS309 - History of the American Family (3 cr.)

Changes in the structure and size of families; changing functions of the family, changing roles and relationships within the family; the family as a reflection of broader trends in society; new methodologies and approaches to social history. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

HIS310 - The Colonial Period: Roots of American Society (3 cr.)

Political, social, economic and intellectual life of the American colonial period. Puritanism, Indian-white relations, slavery and other social strains. The colonial period's relationships to the American Revolution. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS311 - America's Revolutionary Era, 1763-1815 (3 cr.)

Compares the American Revolution with a variety of present day revolutionary movements in such aspects as 1) the social, cultural and political origins of colonial rebellions, 2) the problems of fighting a war of liberation while attempting to unify and govern a pluralistic, contentious population, and 3) the consolidation of governmental power and creation of nationalism. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

HIS314 - Civil War and Reconstruction (3 cr.)

Causes and events leading to secession; ideology of republican party; military campaigns; impact of the war on American thought; emancipation; conservative and radical reconstruction; aspirations of blacks; failure of reconstruction. (Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS315 - Corporate Impact on America, 1877-1933 (3 cr.)

Examines the effects of industrial capitalism and the corporation on American society, economy and politics. Topics will include incorporation, corporate principles in politics and society, business interests in foreign policy, and the workers' and farmers' response to corporate capitalism. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS316 - U.S. Immigration and Ethnic History (3 cr.)

This course presents a chronological/thematic overview of immigration in the United States from European colonization to the early twenty-first century. In addition to learning about major migration movements, students will examine the causes and effects of migration on individuals and communities. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102.

HIS317 - Modern American, 1933-Present (3 cr.)

The New Deal, its interruption by World War II, together with its partial resumption after the war by the Fair Deal, New Frontier and Great Society. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in U.S. history.

HIS319 - U.S. Environmental History (3 cr.)

This course studies the history of the role and place of nature in American culture. The central goal of the course is to explore the changing conceptions of nature in the United States in order to understand ways in which the natural environment have been an influence in the history of the nation. Includes a case study of the Adirondacks. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in history.

HIS320 - History of U.S. Youth Culture (3 cr.)

A cultural history of the American teenager, focusing on the post-WWII era and examining how style and culture play central roles in both youth identity and youth marketing in the United States. Extensive discussion on popular music; films, such as Public Enemy and Blackboard Jungle; and the relationship between popular media and national trends and ideas of juvenile delinquency. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in U.S. history.

HIS323 - Race and Ethnicity in American Culture (3 cr.)

Examines the ways in which notions of race and ethnicity play critical roles in the production of American culture, focusing on African American and immigrant cultural traditions. Topics could include the 19th century minstrel stage; the Harlem Renaissance; "Amos-n-Andy"; films such as Birth of a Nation and Bulworth; the assimilation of Jewish and Mexican immigrant groups; the zoot suit riots; Japanese fashion and theatre traditions; World War II propaganda films; Beat literature and comedy; and the rise of the hip hop nation. (Every Year or Third Semester). Liberal arts.

HIS324 - Germany, 1870 to the Present (3 cr.)

Development of newly created German Empire. Modern German leadership and the impact of two world wars upon the Germans. Resulting effects on international relations. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in European history.

HIS326 - History of Modern Britain 1600 - Present (3 cr.)

This course will present the history of the United Kingdom as a group of different nations that retained unique social identities in spite of political and economic union. Political, social, economic and global aspects will be studied in parallel to understand both the development of Great Britain as an imperial and industrial power and the decline of that power in the twentieth century. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

HIS330 - The Cultural History of U.S. Exploration (3 cr.)

Study of the social and cultural history of modern U.S. exploration in various physical environments. Topics include: cultural and political uses of exploration; the social practice of engineering expeditions; the consequences and social repercussions of exploration. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three credits of U.S. history.

HIS331 - Gender and U.S. Popular Culture (3 cr.)

The social construction of gender in modern America through the lens of popular culture: the way TV shows, films, advertisements, magazines, video games, and music depict and define "men" and "women." Topics include: understanding gender in a historical, cultural context; examining femininity and masculinity as cultural inventions; using popular culture to resist gender norms. (Spring). Prerequisite: U.S. History General Education course (3AH or 4USC).

HIS335 - Social History of Early Modern Europe (3 cr.)

Survey of major changes and issues in European society from 1450-1750. Topics include: material culture, family and community structure, social conflict, religious beliefs, rural and urban popular culture and the experiences of particular groups such as the subordinate classes, women and peasants. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS121.

HIS338 - Europe, 1914-1939 (3 cr.)

Analysis of European history from 1914 to the eve of World War II. Political developments, post-war adjustments and revolution; the Depression and the growth of Fascism. Social and economic factors stressed. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in European history.

HIS339 - European History, 1939 to Present (3 cr.)

World War II, the political developments following it, as they concern Europe, the Cold War, the continents division by the superpowers; and its reassertion as an economic and cultural force in world affairs. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in European history.

HIS342 - History of Ecology and Environmentalism (3 cr.)

Study of the history of ecological science and conservation from the eighteenth century to the present, focusing on the interchange between science, politics, and public policy, primarily in America. Topics include: foundations of ecological thought, history of the discipline of ecology, conservation, and environmentalism. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in history; sophomore standing.

HIS344 - Adirondack Environmental History (3 cr.)

Study of the history of interactions between humans and the environment in the Adirondack Mountains and Lake Champlain from the sixteenth century to the present. Topics include human uses of material nature; human ideas and culture of nature; the political and economic management of nature; race, class, gender, and environmental justice. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: sophomore standing; U.S. history (3 cr.) or environmental science (3 cr.).

HIS347 - Iroquois World to 1800 (3 cr.)

A survey of cultural, social and political life among the Iroquois from 1450 to 1800 with particular attention to Iroquois interactions with neighboring Native American societies and European colonists in an exceptionally turbulent era. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: one course in either U.S., Canadian or European history.

HIS354 - Peasants: Society and Rebellion (3 cr.)

Study of peasants in the developing world from the late eighteenth century to the present. Topics include peasant farming and family life, interaction and conflict with the modern world, pre-modern forms of insurrection, banditry and modern guerrilla warfare, as well as peasant rebellions in support of communist revolutions and resistance against those governments. (Fall). Liberal arts.

HIS355 - Gender and Migration in the World (3 cr.)

What are the "gender rules" that affect migration? How do different communities cope with the need to migrate and the demands of family structure? Compares gender-based migration strategies in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries around the world, evaluates reasons for success or failure and assesses the interaction of gender and ethnic identity. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisite: three credits of history.

HIS356 - History of Global Frontiers (3 cr.)

Families in covered wagons and Zulu warriors may be iconic images of frontiers, but how did the frontiers emerge in the first place? While studying frontier encounters around the world and across time, this course examines how historians have shaped the idea of 'frontier' to explain the meeting of cultures, with a focus on comparison as a method of historical analysis. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and HIS101 or HIS121 or HIS132 or ANT102; sophomore standing.

HIS362 - Modern Mexico (3 cr.)

Mexican history: its movement through problems of creating a nation state; the North American and French Interventions: the dictatorship of the Porfiriato; Revolution of 1910; the evolution of the modern Mexican state and society after 1920. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of history or three credits of Latin American studies.

HIS3625 - Latin American Revolutions (3 cr.)

Examines revolutionary movements in Latin America. Particular emphasis on the twentieth century and on social conditions, political systems, economic development, and foreign relations. Examines prevailing debates on economic, political, social, and cultural dynamics of revolutions. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: one of the following: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS132 or HIS161 or HIS162 or LAS111 or PSC321.

HIS367 - Gender and Race in the History of Medicine in the United States (3 cr.)

Explores the importance of the categories of gender and race to the development of medical practice in the United States and to the shape our current medical system has taken, especially in regard to options Americans have in selecting healers, options Americans have in becoming accredited healers, and the development of the American hospital system. We will also look at the historical and current experience of women and minorities in the American health care system. (Spring ). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HIS101 or HIS102 or POI.

HIS369 - Topics: Exploring Jewish History (3 cr.)

Exploration of some of the aspects of Jewish history, seeking patterns, cultural values and specific historical settings that reveal how Jews have lived, by choice or coercion, within the context of other societies. Topics will vary in content and focus with each offering (e.g., "The Jew in the Western World," "Jews in the 20th Century," "The Holocaust," "Racism, Anti-Semitism and Western Values," "Zionism, Israel and the Middle East," etc.). May be repeated once for credit with a different topic. Liberal Arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: INT101 or HIS121 or HIS122 or POI.

HIS370 - History of Canadian Women (3 cr.)

Position and role of women in Canadian history from 1500 to the present involving class discussion, lectures and student presentations. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS171 or HIS172.

HIS372 - North America and the World (3 cr.)

This seminar uses a comparative focus to explore the history of Canada, the United States and Mexico in the second half of the twentieth century. Students will investigate the ways these countries have shared a common trajectory, and also upon the ways in which they have differed. Important economic, political, sociocultural and environmental issues will be examined, as well as the impact of globalization. (Every Other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS161 or HIS162 or HIS171 or HIS172 or POI.

HIS373 - 20th Century Canada (3 cr.)

Reading seminar in development of modern Canada from 1896 federal election through the Trudeau years. Although emphasis changes annually, two or more of the following themes are treated: constitutional development; World War I; Canadian-American relations; industrialization-urban Canada, the Commonwealth; Canada and the Cold War; peacekeeping in the Third World. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS172.

HIS375 - Borderland and Migration History: Canada and the United States (3 cr.)

A study of the migration streams between Canada and the United States from the colonial period to the present. Canada-U.S. migrations are examined in a global context, addressing social, political, economic, and cultural issues. (Every other year) Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172.

HIS377 - Women and Autobiography (3 cr.)

Explores the uses of women's autobiography in the discipline of women's history. Reading consists of autobiographies of women from a variety of 20th Century global contexts, e.g., South Africa, Zanzibar, Guatemala, China, India, and the American South, and of reviews and criticism of these autobiographies. While learning about some fascinating women, students critically explore autobiographies as a source of insight on issues such as empowerment, oppression, legal rights, motives, self portrayal and multiple visions of liberation. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and any 100-level history or English course.

HIS378 - History of Migration in Britain and the British Empires (3 cr.)

From the fifteenth century to the twentieth the people of the British Isles spread from two small European islands to populate colonies and nations on five continents. This course covers migration within and between those territories, from internal migration, the colonization of Ireland and disastrous early attempts at New World colonies through the establishment of the Raj community in India and the reverse migration of British colonists and colonials during the decolonization that followed the Second World War. (every second or third year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS121 or HIS122 or ANT102.

HIS379 - Quebec in the United States: Franco-American History and Culture (3 cr.)

This course examines the history and culture of French-Canadian descendants in the United States. It will explore issues of gender and class, the social significance of language, the effects of assimilation, and the challenges faced by contemporary Franco-Americans. (Every other Fall). Liberal Arts. Prerequisite: CAS111 or HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172.

HIS381 - Women in East Asian History (3 cr.)

Study of women in East Asian from the first millennium BC to the present. Topics include Confucianism, palace women, comfort women, prostitutes and geisha, women in peasant villages and urban factories, modernization and feminist voices, and women's lives in modern communist and capitalist countries. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in history; sophomore standing.

HIS384 - Religion in the Modern World (3 cr.)

Explores the complex position of religion in modern western societies, as both a source of conflict and an agent of change. Primary emphasis is on the political uses of religion, rather than on the defining tenets of any particular religious tradition. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing; HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS121 or HIS122 or HIS132.

HIS385 - Advanced Historical Practices (3 cr.)

Within an interactive seminar format that stimulates writing and speaking, students develop the analytical and interpretive skills learned in HIS285 in order to read and evaluate primary and secondary source materials, Seminar topics are cross-cultural historical themes, such as imperialism, slavery, capitalism, fascism, etc. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: ENG101, HIS285, six 300/400 level credits in history, junior standing, or POI.

HIS386 - Japan and China in the World Wars (3 cr.)

Examines the world wars within the context of regional conflict in East Asia. Topics include the Japanese invasion of China, the emergence of General Tojo, "Comfort Women," the "Rape of Nanjing," Hiroshima, and the rise of Chinese Communists. Discusses global issues including colonization and industrialization of the Pacific Rim, Pan-Asianism, and Asian alliances with Allied and Axis powers. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

HIS389 - People's Republic of China (3 cr.)

The revolutionary transformation of China since 1949; selected topics in culture and civilization. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

HIS391 - Slavery in the Americas, 1492 - 1889 (3 cr.)

Examines slavery across the Americas. Case studies in Brazil, the United States, and the Caribbean. Special emphasis on race and its relationship to slavery. Examines prevailing debates on economic, political, cultural, social dynamics of slavery. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: one of the following: HIS101, 132, 161, 162, 121, 122, or LAS111, or AAS103.

HIS394 - U.S. Historic Sites (3 cr.)

An investigation into the nation's major historic sites with particular meaning. While assessing their relationship to major historical issues--including race, class, gender and imperialism--the course examines such sites as Jamestown, Williamsburg, Little Big Horn, Gettysburg, Pearl Harbor and Ellis Island. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits of U.S. history.

HIS395 - Introduction to Historic Preservation (3 cr.)

The development and styles of America's built environment, the growth of the historic preservation movement, the philosophies of preservation, contemporary preservation work, on-site activities, and opportunities in the field. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing.

HIS396 - Social Studies Teaching Methods (3 cr.)

This course examines the focus, methods, and debates of the social sciences and strategies for teaching these topics in social studies. The course is designed to help prepare pre-service teachers to teach adolescent learners effectively in the social studies classroom. Prospective social studies teachers will learn to describe educational goals, learning objectives, and student outcomes and then to match them to instructional materials, teaching processes, assessment practices, and the adolescent learning process. Students of this course will gain practical experience in developing and teaching effective social studies lessons. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: HIS285.

HIS397 - History Museums in the United States (3 cr.)

Traces the social and cultural development of U.S. history museums from the "cabinets of curiosities," to patriotic houses and re-created villages, to today's diverse organizations. Examples include Colonial Williamsburg, Seneca Falls, New York's Tenement Museum, New Bedford's Whaling Museum, and Elvis's Graceland. Topics encompass the changing definition of historic, the conflicting uses of the past, and controversies over inclusion, representation, and contemporary politics. (Every Fourth or Fifth Semester). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HIS101 or HIS102 or POI.

HIS398 - Strangers in the Land: Canadian and U.S. Responses to Immigrant Populations (3 cr.)

This course will compare and contrast community reactions to immigrant populations in the United States and Canada from the mid-1800's to the present. Immigrations to Canada and the USA will be viewed in a global context, addressing social, political, economic, and cultural issues. (Every Other Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102 or HIS171 or HIS172 or HIS173.

HIS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS401 - Topics in Area Histories (3 cr.)

Using an analytical approach and seminar structure, special topics are chosen by the instructors in their area of specialty for indepth study. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three credits in topic area.

HIS414 - Religion and Popular Culture in the United States (3 cr.)

Examines the history of religious representations in the United States modern popular culture, including the ways followers of major organized religions have utilized pop culture; students will also identify and critically examine religious themes in mainstream pop culture texts. (Spring or Fall, every other year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS101, HIS102, HIS121, HIS122, HIS132, HIS161, or HIS162.

HIS425 - History of Scotland from Independence to Devolution (3 cr.)

Connects ideas of Scottishness to the myth and reality of the Scottish past. Covers Scottish history from the 13th century Wars of Independence through the creation of the Devolved Scottish Parliament in 1999. Throughout there is an emphasis on distinctive Scottish identity in contrast to and in concert with England and Britain. (Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS121 or HIS122 and ENG101 or satisfaction of Written Expression requirement or equivalent.

HIS426 - Christians and Jews (3 cr.)

Explores the complex relationship between Christians and Jews throughout history. Looks beyond instances of conflict and coexistence to how being Jewish and being Christian are kinds of experience that evolved in tandem with one another, and take root in specific contexts, in which power, politics, economics and other factors are decisive. Liberal arts. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: sophomore standing and any three credits of history.

HIS430 - American Indian History (3 cr.)

Examines major themes, events, and trends in North American Indian history. Focuses on the historical experiences of Native Americans and their struggles to retain their cultures while adapting to the challenges posed by catastrophic population decline, expansion and conquest by colonizing powers, and the "Indian policies" adopted by the United States. Liberal arts. (Every Other Fall). Prerequisites: HIS101 or HIS102 or ANT102.

HIS485 - Senior Project: Topic (3 cr.)

Working in a seminar setting with a faculty mentor, the student will design and complete a major historical project (e.g., original research paper, archival collection, exhibit, etc.). (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS385, twelve 300-400 level credits in history; senior standing; or POI.

HIS486 - Senior Seminar in Social Studies Pedagogy (3 cr.)

This capstone research seminar experience provides students with an opportunity to conduct primary and secondary research in social studies, develop and articulate original arguments, and transform this research into a pedagogical project suitable for teaching in an adolescent education social studies class. Prerequisites: HIS285, HIS385 and HIS396.

HIS490 - Honors Project (3 cr.)

Building the foundations of an in-depth investigation of a significant historical problem: review and assessment of appropriate secondary literature, identification and study of relevant primary sources. Topic to be determined under supervision of Honors Project Faculty Sponsor and faculty committee. (Fall). Prerequisites: overall GPA of 3.5 in history courses; cumulative GPA of 3.2; HIS385; and departmental approval of topic.

HIS491 - Honors Project II (3 cr.)

Completing an in-depth investigation of a significant historical problem begun in HIS490, producing a substantial work of original scholarship, and presenting the results to a public audience. Topic to be determined under supervision of Honors Project Faculty Sponsor and faculty committee. Public defense of project at its conclusion. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: overall GPA of 3.5 in history courses; cumulative GPA of 3.2; HIS385; departmental approval of topic; and either concurrent enrollment in HIS490 or successful completion of HIS490.

HIS498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

Under the direct guidance of an on-site supervisor, the intern undertakes a professionally related project that prepares him/her for the particular skills and work needed in that profession. Opportunities include specialized work at a library archive or local history collection, a historic house museum or history museum, a historic site or preservation organization, or a similar work placement. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: HIS285; and nine additional HIS credits; and 3.0 overall GPA; and junior or senior standing; and Campus-Designated Learning Contract.

HIS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HIS515 - Topics in American History (3 cr.)

Using an analytical approach and seminar structure, special collections of readings focusing on a common theme are chosen by the instructors in their area specialty for in-depth study. Students prepare a research paper in the specialty. (Fall/Spring).Prerequisites: 6 hours in United States history.

HIS599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HON100 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON101 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON102 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON103 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON104 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON105 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON106 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON107 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON108 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON109 - Topics: Foreign Language (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON110 - Topics: Literature or Philosophy/Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON111 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON112 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON113 - Topics: Literuate, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON114 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON115 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON116 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON117 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON118 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON119 - Topics: Literature, Philosophy, Humanities Liberal arts. (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON120 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON121 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON122 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON123 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON124 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON125 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON126 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON127 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON128 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON129 - Topics: American History (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON130 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON131 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON132 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON133 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON134 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON135 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON136 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON137 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON138 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON139 - Topics: Social Sciences (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON140 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON141 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON142 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON143 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON144 - Topics: Calculus I (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON145 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON146 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON147 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON148 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON149 - Topics: Math (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON150 - Topics: The Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON151 - Topics: The Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON152 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON153 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON154 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON155 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON156 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON157 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON158 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON159 - Topics: Arts (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON160 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON161 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON162 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON163 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON164 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON165 - Topics: Other World Civ (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON166 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON167 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON168 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON169 - Topics: Other World Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON170 - Topics: Natural Sci w/o Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON171 - Topics: Natural Sciences without Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON172 - Topics: Natural Sciences without Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON173 - Topics: Natural Sciences w/o Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON174 - Topics: Natural Sci w/o Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON175 - Topics: Natural Sciences without Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON176 - Topics: Natural Sciences without Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON177 - Topics: Natural Sciences without Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON178 - Topics: Natural Science with Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON179 - Topics: Natural Science with Lab (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON180 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON181 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON182 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON183 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON184 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON185 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON186 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON187 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON188 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON189 - Topics: Western Civilization (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON190 - Honors Tutorials (1 to 3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON191 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (1 to 3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON192 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (1 to 3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON193 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON194 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (1 to 3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON195 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (1 to 3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON196 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON197 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON198 - Topics: Honors Tutorials (1 to 3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON300 - Topics: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON301 - Topics: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON302 - Topics: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON303 - Topics: Global Issues (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON304 - Topics: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON305 - Topics: Global Issues (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON306 - Topics: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON307 - Topics: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON308 - Topics: Global Issues (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON309 - Topics: Global Issues (3 to 4 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON310 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON311 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON312 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON313 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON314 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON315 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON316 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON317 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON318 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON319 - Individual, Society, and Responsibility (3 cr.)

Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON320 - Art, Literature, and Interpretation (3 cr.)

General Honors Seminars in Art, Literature and Interpretation will enhance appreciation for the fine arts, literatures, and narratives articulating the human condition. Students will learn to interpret various kinds of artistic expression in terms of their styles, genres, histories or aesthetic qualities, and they will develop both theoretical and critical perspectives for engaging art and literature. Either discipline specific or interdisciplinary methodologies will be applied to the study of meaning and the effects of artistic expression. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON321 - Art, Literature, and Interpretation (3 cr.)

General Honors Seminars in Art, Literature and Interpretation will enhance appreciation for the fine arts, literatures, and narratives articulating the human condition. Students will learn to interpret various kinds of artistic expression in terms of their styles, genres, histories or aesthetic qualities, and they will develop both theoretical and critical perspectives for engaging art and literature. Either discipline specific or interdisciplinary methodologies will be applied to the study of meaning and the effects of artistic expression. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Liberal arts.

HON401 - Topics: Seminar in Gender & Women's Studies (3 cr.)

The objectives of the course vary depending on the particular subject matter of the course. In each seminar students are expected to engage in critical thinking, intensive writing, debate, and discussion. These seminars will provide students with a challenging exposure to gender and women's studies issues. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior class standing.

HON402 - Topics: Seminar in Philosophy (3 cr.)

The objectives of the course vary depending on the particular subject matter of the course. In each seminar students are expected to engage in critical thinking, intensive writing, debate, and discussion. These seminars will provide students with a challenging exposure to philosophy issues. (Occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior class standing.

HON496 - Instructional Practicum I (1 to 3 cr.)

This course is designed for Honors Program students who will work under the supervision of and with a member of the college faculty while she/he is teaching in the Honors Program. A contract specifying the responsibilities of the student, number of contact hours and method(s) of evaluation must be filed with the Honors Program Director prior to registration. Students will be expected to attend all scheduled meetings of Honor Seminar instructors and the Honors Program director. The course may be repeated once as Instructional Practicum II with the permission of the Honors Program director. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: upper-division standing, completion of General Honors requirement and POI

HON499 - Advanced Honors Project (1 to 15 cr.)

This course is designed for Honors Program students who are undertaking an Advanced Honors Project of his/her own design. Students must submit a detailed Advanced Honors Project Proposal to the Honors Council. The student must secure the agreement of a faculty mentor to supervise the project. The proposal must include a statement signed by the student's faculty mentor approving the project. The project must be approved by the Honors Council prior to registration for credit. The student must make a public presentation of the results of the project. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: upper-division standing, completion of General Honors requirement (except in extraordinary circumstances, as determined by the Honors Program director)

HRT199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HRT201 - Special Topics in Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management (1 to 3 cr.)

Student is introduced to special topics relating to hotel, restaurant, and tourism management. (occasional).

HRT202 - History, Resources, and Policies of Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management (3 cr.)

An overview of the historical perspectives of the hospitality industry, a review of the literature and data base resources in the hospitality industry, and an introduction to the HRTM program including college, SBE, and departmental policies, procedures, and requirements. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: HRT251. Prerequisite: HRTM major or approval of HRTM Department Chair.

HRT251 - Principles of Tourism (3 cr.)

The course examines the history and the theories behind the development of the modern tourism industry. Additionally, the course reviews the socio-cultural, environmental, and economic aspects of the tourism industry as well as the role of government and tourism organizations in the modern industry. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Corequisite: HRT202.

HRT281 - Sanitation and Safety in the Hospitality Industry (1 cr.)

Scientific basis for sanitation procedures and regulations that influence managerial decisions in hospitality operations. Current environmental safety issues. (occasional).

HRT299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HRT310 - Organization and Management of Human Resources in the Hospitality Industry (3 cr.)

Principles of Human Resource Management in Hospitality Organizations. Includes issues of organizational structure, job design, staffing, motivation, and assessment. (Fall/Spring). Liberal Arts. Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT321 - Hospitality Marketing (3 cr.)

A study of the uniqueness of hospitality marketing through the application of marketing theories and tools used to market the hospitality industry. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101, MKE 290, HRT202, HRT251, and junior standing.

HRT354 - International Hospitality (3 cr.)

Examines the hospitality industry from a perspective beyond the purely American view and toward a more complete worldwide understanding. Explores the current issues and challenges created by the global marketplace. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT360 - Food Beverage and Labor Cost Control (3 cr.)

Financial and managerial methods of the hospitality industry for maintaining effective controls on costs and operating expenses. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT361 - Foodservice Planning and Purchasing (3 cr.)

Conceptualize, design and layout equipment for a foodservice facility. Purchasing methods, production, storage and handling of foods used by food service establishments. (occasional). Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT362 - Food Service Operations Management I (5 cr.)

Fundamental principles of food preparation with emphasis on managing the cooking process in a commercial or institutional environment and the presentation of appealing foods. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT362L - Food Service Operations Management I Lab (0 cr.)

HRT364 - Beverage Management (3 cr.)

An introduction to alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverage production, geographic origins, sales and legal issues. The management of beverage dispensing outlets to maximize profitability. (occasional). Prerequisites: HRT360, HRT majors only, 21 years old.

HRT373 - Applied Food and Beverage Management (3 cr.)

The applications of theories and principles to food, beverage, catering, and related sectors of the hospitality industry. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: HRT202, HRT251, and junior standing.

HRT383 - Lodging Operations Management I (3 cr.)

The study of operations and interactions of departments within the rooms division of a hotel with particular emphasis on front desk functions. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT384 - Hospitality Financial Management (3 cr.)

Financial practices and systems used in the hospitality industry. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ACC201, HRT202, HRT360.

HRT385 - Risk Management (1 cr.)

An investigation of potential exposure to financial loss due to legal and natural liability in the lodging, foodservice and travel industry. An understanding of the importance of limiting risk in preserving the economic life of the operation. (occasional). Prerequisites: HRT383.

HRT397 - Physical Systems Management (3 cr.)

The problems of management and operation of physical structures associated with foodservice, lodging or institutional enterprises. (occasional). Prerequisite: HRT202, HRT383.

HRT399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

HRT442 - Topics in Hospitality Management (1 to 3 cr.)

Selected hospitality management topics of particular current interest. The course may explore an area taken from another hospitality management course in greater detail and depth, or it may concentrate on an area of hospitality management not generally covered by existing courses. Can be repeated when titles vary. (occasional). Liberal arts.

HRT453 - Convention and Meeting Planning (3 cr.)

An introduction and overview of the meeting and convention market segment and the management of that from the perspective of the on-site or corporate meeting planner. An analysis of the specific product lines that make up meeting and conventions and the market trends and issues that impact each product. (occasional). Prerequisites: HRT202 and HRT251.

HRT454 - Resort Management (3 cr.)

Investigate development of resort properties as tourism and business destinations. Examine management issues including planning, development, operation, and design of recreational amenities. Explore the financing and capital requirements of resort amenities. (occasional). Prerequisites: HRT202 and HRT251.

HRT456 - Current Issues and Trends in Tourism (3 cr.)

Selected current issues, topics and trends of relevance to the hospitality/tourism industry. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: HRT251.

HRT462 - Hospitality Law (3 cr.)

Examination of the laws and regulations that affect hospitality management. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT464 - Food Service Operations Management II (5 cr.)

Application of the principles of food preparation, production and service. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: HRT360, HRT362, HRT321.

HRT483 - Lodging Operations Management II (3 cr.)

The study of operations and interactions of departments within the rooms divisions of a hotel with particular emphasis on housekeeping, maintenance and security. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT495 - Leadership in the Hospitality Industry (3 cr.)

Assess the characteristics and traits that differentiate a leader from a manager and their effects on the hospitality organization. The role of leadership in corporate success. (Fall/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: last semester senior standing.

HRT496 - Teaching Practicum (1 to 4 cr.)

The student will be allowed to significantly participate in the delivery of a course in HRTM under close faculty supervision. Specific duties may include assistance in lesson planning, supervision of students, especially in a laboratory setting, as well as training, mentoring, and tutoring students in the class. Additionally, the student may assist in the ordering of products for a laboratory, the preparation of products for a laboratory, as well as the set up, management, and closing of laboratories and classrooms. The student will obtain actual management experience from this course. (occasional). May be repeated for a maximum of 8 credits.

HRT497 - HRT Field Experience (0 to 1 cr.)

Four-hundred hours of hospitality industry related work experience that provides an opportunity to use classroom theory with the practical application in the industry is required. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: HRT202.

HRT499 - Independent Study (1 to 6 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

INT101 - Introduction to Judaism (3 cr.)

Overview of Jewish history, calendar of holy days; theology; liturgy; sacred texts; Zionism, anti-Semitism; religious movements; women in Judaism; relationship with Christianity and Islam; contemporary issues. (Spring). Liberal arts.

INT104 - Introduction to the World's Religions (3 cr.)

An introductory inquiry into the structures of five of the world's major religions: Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in their understanding of the relationship of the human and the divine. This course is an examination of both Eastern and Western religious traditions as a means of cultivating a critical and historical perspective on the related elements of myth, symbol, and ritual. In our study of religion, we seek to understand and appreciate how religious expression functions as an integral component of diverse human experiences. (Fall). Liberal arts.

INT107 - Cross-Cultural Conversation (1 cr.)

This workshop course, coordinated by an ESL instructor, is designed for informal conversation practice and cultural exchange between native speakers of English and ESL students. Native speakers, who serve as small group conversation mentors, gain experience working with students from a variety of cultural backgrounds and languages. ESL students are able to practice conversational English and thus improve their speaking, listening and pronunciation skills in a natural, informal setting. Course may be repeated up to three (3) times. (Fall). Liberal arts.

INT120 - Individual Academic & Social Expression (3 cr.)

Exploration of the self in the context of social relationships, university life, and life skill development. Emphasis upon social expression topics such as identity and self-image, maintaining healthy relationships, cultural diversity, conflict styles and resolution, technology and relationships, socio-emotional intelligence, and individual accountability in the social and professional spheres. Integrates academic planning topics such as understanding university disciplines, navigating academic policies, choosing a direction, and developing as a future professional. (Fall). Liberal arts.

INT130 - Literature of Former French Colonies (Fall) (3 cr.)

An introduction to poetry and drama selected from primarily Francophone non-English-speaking cultures. Liberal arts.

INT190 - Introduction to Legal Studies (3 cr.)

This course shall serve as the gateway course for all students interested in pursuing the Minor in Legal Studies. Topics covered include duties and responsibilities of attorneys and paralegals, civil and criminal litigation, the court system and alternative dispute resolution, and legal writing and critical thinking. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

INT199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

INT202 - Walking and Human Experience (3 cr.)

Analysis of literary, artistic and philosophical representations of walking, and of physical and social constraints (such as ideologies of gender, class, race, ability) on walking. Examination of walking in human history as developing bipedalism, as a mode of transportation, as necessity for sustenance, as exploration and cartography, as contemplative activity, as psychological relief, as social stigma, as forced march. (once or twice per year). Liberal arts.

INT204 - Academic Communication I (1 cr.)

Provide support in major or general education classes to English Language Learners who transfer to Plattsburgh State from US colleges. Academic expectations, communications, and study skills will be considered within the context of students' academic courses. Students will meet with a mentor as well as the instructor to practice skills and with a tutor, if needed, for specific courses. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101 or POI.

INT205 - Academic Communication II (1 cr.)

Provide support in various General Education or major subject classes in which English Language Learners may have difficulty. Academic expectations, communications, and study skills will be addressed within the context of students' academic courses. Students will meet each week with the instructor, with a student mentor to practice skills and communication strategies, and, as needed, with a subject matter tutor in the Learning Center. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101 or POI.

INT221 - Sports Pep Band (1 cr.)

Live music has always been a crucial part of sporting events. By engaging in ensemble playing in a public forum, students will increase their musical knowledge, proficiency, and create and foster a high level of "school spirit" and student body engagement. (Fall/Spring).

INT225 - Gospel Choir (0 to 2 cr.)

This course introduces singers to a wide range of repertoire of the African-American tradition including spirituals, anthems and traditional gospel music. Selections are presented to students both from an oral tradition and from printed scores. Emphasis is placed on developing ensemble performance skills and increasing musical understanding. Students participate in at least two major performances per semester. In addition, opportunities exist for students to participate as an accompanist through performance with various musical instruments. Liturgical Dance and Dance Stepping is also available for interested students. Those students who enroll in either dance shall receive 2-credits per semester. May be repeated for a maximum of 12 credits.(Fall/Spring) Prerequisites: by audition; MUS233 Voice Class highly recommended.

INT299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

INT303 - Examining Diversity Through Film (3 cr.)

This course will provide students an opportunity to examine dimensions of diversity in the U.S. Diversity themes of race/ethnicity, gender, class, sexual orientation, and disability will be explored through critical analysis of films and readings, and actively processed through group dialogue, reflective writing, and small group presentations. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and completion of General Education requirement in either the Social Sciences (3SS,4SS, or 5SS) category or the Humanities (3LPH, 4HUM, or 5HUM) category.

INT305 - Food Security and Emergency Interventions (3 cr.)

An investigative study of socio-agrarian, socio-economic and socio-environmental issues and approaches to the matter of Food Security and Emergency Food Security Interventions, including the paradox of there being more than enough food to feed the world but hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition persist. The course will also address the interplay between land distribution, gender, structural and political change, and the social economy of natural resource conservation and rural development. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: ENG101 or HIS132 or SOC101 or LAS111 or PSC120 or POI.

INT306 - Global Political Economy (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the broad structures and processes of the contemporary global political economy (GPE). The course analyzes the dynamic intersection of global economics and politics examining the historical and current relationships between states, markets and groups within societies. The course includes an introduction to the basic theoretical paradigms in (GPE), including the liberal, economic nationalist, structuralist, and feminist perspectives and uses these frameworks to explore how asymmetric power between rich and poor countries affect the process and outcomes of globalization in specific regions of the world. (Fall). Liberal arts.

INT314 - Interpreting Popular Culture (3 cr.)

Interdisciplinary analysis of specific popular culture productions, and of the ways in which producers, advertisers, consumers, regulators, scholars, critics, fans, adaptors, parodists "use" such artifacts to deploy, challenge, perpetuate, celebrate and/or subvert dominant values, beliefs, assumption, and stereotypes. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and GWS101, or SOC101, or CMM118, or ENG195, or ANT102, or POI.

INT315 - Religious Interactions in Contemporary U.S. Society (3 cr.)

In the highly diversified population of the U.S., people with different religions and beliefs interact in our neighborhoods, cities, workplaces, schools and states. We will look at what effect these interactions have on the daily lives of the individual, the family and the community. This course provides an introduction to the impact of religious diversity on the individual and the organizations with which he or she interacts. We will explore the interactions of religion, culture, politics, education and science and the complexities of these relationships and how they influence each other. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

INT316 - Impact of Terrorism, War, Crisis, and Disasters on Health (3 cr.)

This course will examine the global issues of terrorism, bioterrorism, war, and disasters in terms of health effects on vulnerable populations, with an emphasis on human rights. Root causes of disasters, war, and terrorism will be discussed. Health effects of bioterrorism and the threat of terrorism will be explored. Major emphasis will be on primary prevention and ethical responsibility for these issues across nations. (Winter/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: one of the following: ACC201, BUS203, CHE101, CMM311, GWS302, HDF311, LAS111, FNI211, PHI102, PHI104,SOC101, PSY101, ANT102, BIO101, BIO102, PSC100, GLS101, PHY101, PSC100, PSC120, INT303, SWK300, or POI.

INT325 - Romance, Sex, Love, and Marriage (3 cr.)

This course will enable students to examine various perspectives on romance, sex, love, and marriage. Through discussion developed through the use of scholarship and pertinent supplementary resources (film, music) an understanding of intimate relationships will develop. Attention will also be given to the impact of consumer culture, stress, sexual violence, and paranoia on relationships. The course will examine the social and cultural contexts of romance, sex, love, and marriage, while promoting critical thinking concerning gender, socio-economic class, race, heterosexism, privilege, and the dynamics of emotion and socialization. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and junior standing; or consent of instructor.

INT357 - Science, Parapsychology, and the Paranormal (3 cr.)

This course will focus on the use of critical thinking to evaluate the validity of extraordinary claims and beliefs by combining theories from the social and natural sciences (e.g., scientific and research methods, and principles of psychology, biology, and physics). Topics will be discussed within the framework of the following: (a) scientific analysis of controversial topics and beliefs in parapsychology and the paranormal, (b) reviewing contemporary experimental research designs and methodology, (c) the cognitive biases and basic learning principles that cause people to believe extraordinary claims and beliefs, and (d) an introduction to principles in psychology, biology, and physics as it applies to the analysis of topics and beliefs in parapsychology and the paranormal. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: PSY101 or SOC101 or POI.

INT365 - Poverty, Disease and the Environment (3 cr.)

This course examines the interrelationships between poverty, disease and the environment. Explores the health and environmental effects of global and national economic policies promoted by the wealthy countries and global multilaterals. Analyzes how poverty, disease and a degraded environment are often outcomes of economic policy. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ECO101 or ENV101 or ENV201 or PSC101 or GEG121.

INT390 - Interdisciplinary Topics (1 to 3 cr.)

Topics of current interest approached from an interdisciplinary perspective. May be repeated for a maximum of six credits with different titles. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

INT399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

INT401 - Southern Mexico Independent Research Project (4 cr.)

Each student will design and complete an independent research project based on their individual interests and academic background. Students will draw on Program faculty and local experts specific to their topics for guidance and assistance. Enrollment limited to students participating in Southern Mexico Program. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SPA214; SOC304/LAS304; SOC334/LAS334

INT402 - Integrative Writing (1 to 3 cr.)

Developed with a faculty advisor, Integrative Writing provides students the opportunity to integrate their college experiences in individualized studies. The course can range from a portfolio and reflective writing, to assigned readings and term papers. Liberal arts. (Fall and Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101; completion of AWR course.

INT496 - Teaching Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Pedagogical functions performed under supervision in an interdisciplinary course or learning community or the college Learning Center. Activities might include tutoring, group mentoring, conferencing, or other duties consistent with ability, experience, and university policy. May be repeated for up to six credits. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisites: sophomore standing or POI.

INT499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

ITA111 - Elementary Italian I (0 or 3 cr.)

Beginning study of Italian with emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and the culture of Italy. Open to students without previous knowledge of Italian or to those who have had no more than two years of Italian in high school. Liberal arts.

ITA112 - Elementary Italian II (0 or 3 cr.)

Continuation of ITA111. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ITA111, or 85 or higher on the Regents Exam, or placement by exam

ITA299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

JOU110 - Introduction to Journalism (3 cr.)

Introduction of journalism as a major and a career, an examination of important media and non-media influences on the news, and case studies of major media events. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

JOU199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

JOU203 - Computer Basics for Journalists (1 cr.)

An introduction to computer essentials, efficiency techniques for email and word processing, spreadsheets, databases, presentation software, and advanced Web searches. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

JOU204 - U.S. Media History (3 cr.)

History of newspapers, magazines and multimedia in the United States. Students learn what issues recur in media history; trace the evolution of media presentation; and analyze the impact of social, political, economic and technological change. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

JOU206 - Introduction to News Writing (3 cr.)

Writing news and news-features with an emphasis on multi-sourced, balanced, and objective reporting. Introduction to deadline writing, journalism ethics and law. Attention to correct grammar, style rules and word usage, and spelling. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

JOU207 - Introduction to Magazine Writing (3 cr.)

Introduction to the craft, art and marketing of magazine writing. Introduction to query letters and story pitches. Broad overview of the magazine industry, past and present. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

JOU208 - Photojournalism (3 cr.)

An introduction to visual reporting, photojournalism, and photography with an emphasis on Photoshop. Practice in deadline composition using a manually operable digital or 35-mm film camera. (Every third semester). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Journalism major or an art: photography minor, or POI.

JOU209 - Grammar for Journalists (3 cr.)

The study of English grammar, punctuation, the grammatical principles behind writing effective sentences and a grammatical terminology that will be applied consistently throughout the journalism curriculum. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: C (2.0) or better in ENG100 or Placement in ENG101 by examination.

JOU210 - Media and Democracy (3 cr.)

A critical study of the role of news media in leading Western democracies, in defending basic human rights such as freedom of speech, upholding individual responsibilities, restraining government and business, and shaping public perceptions of the world. A historical overview of that role in the United States, Canada, France and Britain since the 18th century, focusing on differences in political culture, the role of the media in national and international conflict, the differences between privately-owned and state-controlled media, and the pressures to redefine the role of the media in the 21st century. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

JOU240 - Audio-Video Production for Journalism and Public Relations (3 cr.)

This hands-on course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic theory and practice of audio and video production in journalism and public relations. This course will introduce the student to the basics of capturing and editing audio and video for the Web, including writing for audio and video, operation of audio recorders and video camcorders, and digital editing of audio and video. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: JOU206. Restricted to journalism and public relations majors, or journalism minors; unless student has chair's approval.

JOU299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

JOU302 - International Communication (3 cr.)

Survey of global concerns of the free flow of communication and national sovereignty: political, economic, legal and technological factors. Study of cross-cultural mass communication including structure, content, values and impact on society. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM118, CMM288 or POI.

JOU305 - Unlocking Hidden Stories in the Local Community: Historical Research for PR and Journalism (3 cr.)

Introduces students in Journalism and Public Relations to historical research with primary sources. The types of historical resources investigated in this course include government and archival records commonly available in most communities. Students will learn how to use these sources to recreate historically the lives of individuals and communities. Liberal arts. (Every Other Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

JOU307 - Journalism: Opinion and Review (3 cr.)

Study of the content and style of opinion in American newspapers and magazines. Instruction in editorial, column and critical review writing. Principal attention to the critical review. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

JOU308 - Reporting and News Writing (3 cr.)

Close analysis of the principles of news gathering and the writing of news and news features. Practical experience in gathering and writing news. AWR for journalism: newspaper majors. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101, JOU206 or POI.

JOU309 - Magazine Article Writing (3 cr.)

Close analysis of the craft and art of writing magazine articles. Practical experience in studying magazine markets; finding article ideas; and researching, writing, and selling articles. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: JOU206 or POI.

JOU310 - Sports Reporting (3 cr.)

An introduction to the fundamentals of sports writing, with a focus on practical, hands-on work and an eye toward developing rich, thoughtful journalism out of basic "shoe-leather" coverage. (Spring). Prerequisite: JOU206 or POI.

JOU316 - Digital Publishing (3 cr.)

Development of production skills using InDesign and Photoshop to lay out pages and manipulate images. Production of fliers, brochures, newsletters and other digital literature, with an emphasis on writing in creating content for publication. Exposure to design principles relevant to digital composition. Liberal arts.(Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

JOU317 - Web Design and Production (3 cr.)

Introduces students to Web page design, HTML and CSS. Teaches students to design basic, static websites in CSS and HTML with and without Web page authoring software such as Dreamweaver. Designs will focus on static, fixed-width pages intended for desktop and laptop viewing. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).Prerequisite: ENG101 or POI.

JOU318 - Design and Layout (3 cr.)

Students learn the form, content and treatment of page design, and compose pages that communicate effectively. Liberal arts. (Spring). JOU316 or POI.

JOU320 - Literary Journalism (3 cr.)

An exploration of literary journalism as practiced by Tom Wolfe, John McPhee, Gay Talese, and others. The course also will study how the elements of "New Journalism" have been used or abused by contemporary practitioners. Writing assignments will focus on the techniques of description, scene-setting, narrative voice, and dialogue. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: JOU206, ENG195, or POI.

JOU322 - Mass Media Propaganda 1900-1945 (3 cr.)

An indepth examination of the use of political mass persuasion in the Twentieth Century, from World War I to the dawn of the Cold War. Theoretical constructs are integrated into a basically historical framework. Students who have taken JOU/MSM319 may not take JOU/MSM322 for credit. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM118.

JOU323 - Mass Media Propaganda 1946 - Present (3 cr.)

The role of mass persuasion in political contexts during the second half of the Twentieth Century. Topics range from the Cold War to the Balkan Civil War and beyond. Students who have taken JOU319/CMM319 are not allowed to take JOU323/CMM323 for credit. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM118.

JOU324 - Travel Writing (3 cr.)

Students write and edit travel articles about places, including their people, landscape, weather, history, politics, culture, and folklore. By developing narration skills and critiquing published travel stories, students learn the different types of travel stories. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101 and at least sophomore standing.

JOU325 - Journalism Masterpieces (3 cr.)

Students read, analyze and discuss award-winning journalism from newspapers, magazines and books that are well-reported and well-written, and then examine how they can model this in their own journalistic pursuits. (Every Other Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101.

JOU326 - Outdoor Writing (3 cr.)

Introduces students to non-fiction outdoor writing on a wide variety of topics such as the importance of wilderness, interaction with wildlife, outdoor travel and sports, and the ethics of bloodsports. With a focus on journalism, students will write about their reactions to and experiences in wilderness and outdoors activities. Liberal arts. (Every Other Fall). Prerequisites: JOU206, JOU207 or POI.

JOU330 - Criticism of News Media (3 cr.)

Refer to CMM330 course description. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM118, junior standing.

JOU348 - Mass Communication Ethics (3 cr.)

Refer to CMM348 course description. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM118.

JOU360 - Interactive Journalism (3 cr.)

This course combines technical training in Adobe Flash, an industry standard for delivering multimedia content to the World Wide Web, with instruction in journalism and digital storytelling. Students will learn to plan online multimedia projects; to think as professional communicators in gathering information; to capture still images, audio, and video; and to publish materials they collect in Flash packages designed for the Web. (Fall). Prerequisites: JOU317 or CMM242 or CMM312 or POI.

JOU381 - Topics in Journalism (1 to 3 cr.)

Special topics in journalism which vary with each offering. Topics include writing specialized articles, such as the multipart series and sports stories; learning specialized skills, such as computer-assisted reporting and investigative reporting techniques; and studying specialized areas, such as minorities and the news media, and news room management. May be repeated for credit with different topics. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: vary with topic.

JOU399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

JOU401 - Editing (3 cr.)

Preparation of copy for publication. Fundamentals of editing at a micro and macro level, including copy-editing, headline and caption writing, and handling wire copy. Emphasis given to newsroom decision-making; coaching writers; making sound ethical and legal decisions; and using correct style, grammar, usage, punctuation and spelling. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: JOU308 or POI.

JOU402 - Editorial Newspaper Practicum (1 to 2 cr.)

Practical experience in the weekly composition of Cardinal Points, including reporting, writing, editing, photography and layout. May be taken for one credit (writers) or two credits (editors and managers). May be repeated for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: one credit: JOU206 or POI; two credits: JOU308, JOU316, JOU318, and JOU401; or POI.

JOU403 - Online Magazine Practicum (1 to 2 cr.)

Hands-on experience producing All Points North, a student-produced online magazine that takes a fresh look at the North Country's people, places, and culture. In addition to reporting, writing, editing, and design, students will be responsible for creating story packages that fully employ the multimedia capabilities of the Web. May be repeated for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 for one credit (JOU403B); POI for two credits (JOU403A). For both JOU403A and JOU403B, must be JOU major, ENG: Writing Arts major (0238), or have POI.

JOU406 - Non-Editorial Newspaper Practicum (1 to 2 cr.)

Practical business and advertising experience in the weekly composition of Cardinal Points. May be repeated for credit. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

JOU408 - Journalism Senior Seminar (0 cr.)

Passing exams on grammar and style and submitting an adequate portfolio are graduation requirements for journalism majors. May be repeated. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: senior standing or POI.

JOU409 - Environmental and Science Writing (3 cr.)

Media coverage of controversial scientific and environmental topics, such as global warming, loss of habitat, disease, and bioethics. Course will emphasize writing and organizational skills and translation of scientific material into lay language. AWR for journalism: magazine majors. (every other fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101 and at least junior standing, or POI.

JOU410 - Advanced Reporting (3 cr.)

Teaches new reporting about public issues that goes beyond events and provides meaningful context to stories through the use of investigative reporting, computer-assisted reporting, and interpretative writing. (Every Other Year). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: JOU308 or POI.

JOU411 - Print Magazine Journalism (1 to 2 cr.)

Hands-on experience producing All Points North, a student-produced print magazine that takes a fresh look at the North Country's people, places and culture. In addition to reporting, writing, editing and designing, students will learn about the essential elements of a successful magazine. May be repeated for credit up to a total of 6 credits. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: JOU411A (2 credits): POI; JOU411B (1 credit): JOU206 and JOU309 or POI.

JOU412 - Non-Editorial Magazine Practicum (1 to 2 cr.)

Practical business and advertising experience in the sales and designing of advertisements for All Points North magazine. May be repeated for credit. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

JOU421 - Broadcast Journalism (3 cr.)

A hands-on study of gathering, writing, editing and presenting news for broadcast media. Emphasis is placed on writing style, news gathering, presentation and performance. Approved AWR. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM229 and ENG101.

JOU455 - Media Law (3 cr.)

Refer to CMM455 course description. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: CMM226 or CMM288; junior standing.

JOU496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Supervised tutoring or classroom instructional assistance for journalism courses. A contract specifying each student's duties, approved by the journalism department chair, will be filed in the department office. May be repeated.(Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

JOU497 - Professional Experience (1 to 12 cr.)

Field experience as a practicing journalist producing copy suitable in professional settings such as newspapers, magazines, public relations offices, and radio and television stations. Work produced in class will be published online on a Journalism web page available to the public. May be repeated for credit, up to a maximum of 18 credits. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

JOU498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

Field experience as practicing journalist in professional settings such as newspapers, magazines, public relations offices, and radio and television stations. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing and approval of placement by field supervisor, faculty sponsor and department chairperson.

JOU499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

JOU599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAS110 - Topics in Inter-American Affairs (3 cr.)

As the curriculum core of the North Country High School Model Organization of American States, this course will examine the broad range of problems and issues currently facing the nations and peoples of the Americas. It will involve interdisciplinary, participatory, cooperative learning for high school and college students, including representing a country at a simulated model assembly on campus at the end of May or 1st of June. May be taken twice as different countries are represented. (Spring). Liberal arts.

LAS111 - Introduction to Latin America (3 cr.)

A survey of Latin America from the perspectives of its past, its present and its external relations, including history, geography, social structure and groupings, politics, economy and artistic culture. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

LAS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAS304 - Sustainable Communities and Cultural Studies in Southern Mexico (4 cr.)

Students will consider philosophies, theories, and aspects of development and community, especially from indigenous perspectives. Includes meetings with nongovernmental organizations and community activists, as well as fieldtrips to communities and project sites. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Oaxaca Study Abroad Program. Course is bilingual, English-Spanish. (Fall). Liberal arts. Corequisite: SPA213 or higher. Prerequisite: SPA112 or equivalent.

LAS334 - Ethnography in Southern Mexico (4 cr.)

Classroom instruction in ethnographic techniques combined with extended field trip throughout the rural region of Southern Mexico, including Chiapas and Oaxaca, visiting a variety of environments (cloud forest, rain forest, Pacific coast mangrove regions, coffee-growing highlands), communities and indigenous peoples. Independent residence in rural indigenous community for ethnographic research. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Southern Mexico Program. SOC334 and LAS334 are bilingual, English and Spanish. SPA334 fieldwork and written work are in Spanish. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites for LAS334 and SOC334: SPA214, SOC304/LAS304. Prerequisites for SPA334: SPA315, SOC304/LAS304, or POI.

LAS344 - Seminar (3 cr.)

A multidisciplinary review of 20th century Latin America, with focus on inter-American relations and on one selected country, the capstone course for all LAS majors and minors. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, junior standing or POI.

LAS345 - Latinos/as in the United States (3 cr.)

This course enhances students' understanding of the diverse populations originating in Latin America and residing in the U.S. in relation to global economic changes, the immigration process, assimilation patterns, ethnic mobilization, and their needs in the areas of education, health, and social services. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: LAS111 or POI.

LAS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAS401 - Southern Mexico Independent Research Project (4 cr.)

Each student will design and complete an independent research project based on their individual interests and academic background. Students will draw on Program faculty and local experts specific to their topics for guidance and assistance. Enrollment limited to students participating in Southern Mexico Program. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SPA214; SOC304 or LAS304; SOC334 or LAS334.

LAS402 - Mexican Field Experience in Professional Settings (4 cr.)

This course, part of the minor, LAS for the Professions, places students with a school or agency in Southern Mexico, according to their majors, where they will observe the professional practice of Mexican health care, social work, or education workers. A weekly seminar supports the experience and, as appropriate, students may live with an indigenous family. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SPA214, LAS304, LAS334.

LAS444 - Advanced Seminar (3 cr.)

A multidisciplinary review of the twentieth-century problems and preoccupations of Latin America, the course is the capstone of the Latin American Studies curriculum and brings into final focus the political, social, cultural, economic and historical realities of the region. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, 15 hours of Latin American Studies or equivalent or POI.

LAS459 - Field Study - Organization of American States (1 to 4 cr.)

Preparation includes learning the foreign policy of a Latin American-Caribbean nation and the structure/operation of the OAS, creating resolutions, verbal argumentation, reading and abstracting documents, questioning diplomatic representatives. May be repeated. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: six credits of LAS content courses or POI.

LAS498 - Internship (3 to 15 cr.)

Advanced field work under academic supervision. The course is open to any student in the SUNY study abroad programs in Chile. Participation in the work of the Chilean Congress, the presidency, government agencies, businesses, schools, clinics, service agencies, newspapers and embassies. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: intermediate-level Spanish and by written application once enrolled in the Latin American Southern Cone Programs.

LAS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAT199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAT299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAT399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LAT499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LIB105 - Introduction to Information and Technology Literacy (0 to 1 cr.)

Focuses on the access, retrieval, evaluation, and management of information including a basic introduction to research databases and strategies, computer use, technology issues, and common academic software. Introduces ethical, legal and socioeconomic issues surrounding information and technology. Provides experience in applying research and evaluative skills to develop information and technology literacy in support of academic, professional, and personal needs. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

LIB199 - Independent Study (1 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LIB200 - Critical Research Skills (0 to 1 cr.)

Focuses on the access, retrieval, and evaluation of information. Students will gain experience analyzing research needs, understanding the information landscape, determining the authority of sources, selecting appropriate research tools, and using information legally and ethically. The course concepts support students' academic, professional and personal information needs. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

LIN199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LIN221 - Introduction to General Linguistics (3 cr.)

A survey-style course providing an introduction to the essential vocabulary, concepts and problem-solving methods belonging to various major fields of linguistic science. (Fall & Spring). Liberal arts.

LIN299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LIN350 - Language Structure and Properties (3 cr.)

The analysis of language as a whole and of its properties and functional components, and the examination of aspects of language relating to personal identity. Liberal arts. (Spring).

LIN399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LIN430 - Theoretical Linguistics (3 cr.)

Principles and concepts of theoretical linguistics and general semantics. Phoneme, morpheme, syntax theory; basic transformational processes and applications, deep and surface structure. Concepts in psycho-and sociolinguistics. Linguistics universals and language development issues. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: upper-division standing or POI (LIN 221 recommended).

LIN499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

LIN530 - Theoretical Linguistics (3 cr.)

Principles and concepts of theoretical linguistics and General Semantics. Phoneme, morpheme, syntax theory; basic transformational processes and applications, deep and surface structure. Concepts in psycho- and sociolinguistics. Linguistics universals and language development issues. Prerequisites: POI.

LIN599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MAT101 - Elementary College Mathematics (3 cr.)

Designed to strengthen student's background in elementary algebra and to prepare them for further work in mathematics. Topics include a review of arithmetic concepts using elementary algebra, algebraic expressions, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, absolute value, systems of equations, and functions (linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic). Students will not receive credit for MAT101 if they received credit for a precalculus or calculus course. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

MAT102 - Precalculus (0 to 3 cr.)

Algebra and an introduction to functions and their graphs. Intended for students needing to prepare for calculus. Real and complex number systems, the elementary functions (linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic) equations and inequalities, the algebra of functions and the graphs of functions. Students will not receive credit for MAT102 if they received credit for a calculus course. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Corequisite: May be taken concurrently with MAT104. Prerequisite: MAT101 or the equivalent.

MAT104 - Trigonometry (1 cr.)

Introduction to trigonometry intended for students needing to prepare for calculus. Topics include right triangle trigonometry, radian measure of angles, the wrapping function and circular development of trigonometric functions, graphs of trigonometric functions, basic identities and fundamental properties of the trigonometric functions, solutions to trigonometric equations, and inverse trigonometric functions. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Corequisite: May be taken concurrently with MAT102, MAT221, MAT222 or MAT224. Prerequisite: MAT101 or equivalent (Mathematics Competency Requirement).

MAT110 - Modern Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers I (3 cr.)

A two-semester sequence for elementary education majors with a mathematics concentration, designed to provide an understanding of the mathematical ideas presented in elementary school. Coursework will focus on topics from the five NCTM and NYS content strands: Number sense and operations, Algebra, Geometry, Measurement, and Statistics and Probability. Additional emphasis will be given to the NCTM and NYS process strands. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: mathematics competency requirement.

MAT111 - Modern Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers II (3 cr.)

A two-semester sequence for elementary education majors with a mathematics concentration, designed to provide an understanding of the mathematical ideas presented in elementary school. Coursework will focus on topics from the five NCTM and NYS content strands: Number sense and operations, Algebra, Geometry, Measurement, and Statistics and Probability. Additional emphasis will be given to the NCTM and NYS process strands. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MAT110.

MAT113 - Fundamental Mathematics for Elementary School Teachers (3 cr.)

A one-semester course for non-mathematics concentration childhood education majors designed to provide an understanding of the mathematical ideas presented in elementary school. Coursework will focus on topics from the five NCTM and NYS content strands: number sense and operations, algebra, geometry, measurement, and probability and statistics. Additional emphasis will be given to the NCTM and NYS process strands. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: fulfillment of the mathematics competency requirement; for non-mathematic childhood education majors.

MAT131 - Quantitative Reasoning in Basic Math (3 cr.)

Problem solving using nontrivial real-world problems grounded in fundamental math. Practice in making sense of a given problem, abstracting essential mathematical concepts and developing strategies to arrive at a solution, distinct from rote memory and mimicking previously done problems. Figuring out how to solve the problem is the focus. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT101 or equivalent.

MAT133 - Mathematics in Context (3 cr.)

An introductory level course for non-science majors, focusing on simple mathematical models in contexts of general interest. The course emphasizes the use of mathematics to analyze issues of interest to an informed member of society. There is emphasis on active learning. Students should expect to read and write about the applications of mathematics, and to solve non-routine problems in mathematics. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: completion of mathematics competency requirement.

MAT153 - College Geometry (3 cr.)

A study of Euclidean geometry, and an introduction to Non-Euclidean geometries. The emphasis is on both hands on investigations and the deductive method. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Completion of the Math Competency Requirement.

MAT161 - Introductory Statistics (3 cr.)

Introduction to the fundamentals of statistics. Emphasis is on understanding and application of statistical reasoning. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Completion of Math Competency Requirement.

MAT199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MAT202 - Linear Algebra I (3 cr.)

Introductory, applications-oriented course for students majoring in mathematics, computer science, engineering, economics or science. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces and vector geometry. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT224 or HON144, or equivalent knowledge.

MAT221 - Calculus for the Life, Management, & Social Sciences I (3 cr.)

An introduction to calculus for students of the life, management and social sciences. Topics include: functions, limits, differentiation, applications of derivatives, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus. May be taken concurrently with MAT104. A student will not receive credit for more than one of MAT221, MAT224, and MAT228. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: MAT102 or Calculus Readiness Test.

MAT222 - Calculus for the Life, Management, & Social Sciences II (3 cr.)

A continuation of MAT221. Topics include: techniques and applications of integration, functions of several variables, partial derivatives, total differentials and applications, double integrals and elementary differential equations. May be taken concurrently with MAT104. Cannot be taken in addition to MAT225 for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MAT104 (may be concurrent) and MAT221.

MAT224 - Calculus I (4 cr.)

Basic concepts and techniques of single variable calculus including algebraic and trigonometric functions, limits, continuity, differentiation, applications of differentiation, antidifferentiation and the definite integral. May be taken concurrently with MAT104. Students will not receive credit for more than one of MAT221, MAT224, and MAT228. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Corequisite: MAT104. Prerequisites: MAT102 or Calculus Readiness Test.

MAT225 - Calculus II (4 cr.)

A continuation of MAT224. Includes applications of the definite integral, inverse functions, logarithmic and exponential functions, separable differential equations and their applications, techniques of integration, sequences and infinite series.(Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT224 or HON144.

MAT228 - Applied Calculus (4 cr.)

An introduction to calculus for science students. Topics include: functions, limits, differentiation, applications of derivatives, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, integration, the fundamental theorem of calculus, modeling. Additional possible topics are differential equations, and series. Students will not receive credit for more than one of MAT221, MAT224, and MAT228. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Corequisite: MAT104 must be taken before or concurrently with MAT228. Prerequisite: MAT102 or Calculus Readiness Test. Restricted to the following majors: Ecology, Environmental Science BA, Environmental Science BS, Environmental Science BA Study Option in Environmental Planning and Management, Geology BS, Geology BA, Geology BA Study Option in Earth Science, Geology BA Study Option in Environmental Geology, and Geology/Adolescence Education BA/MST.

MAT231 - Sets, Functions and Relations (3 cr.)

Provides students with the knowledge to make the transition from entry level mathematics to more advanced levels of the subject. Extensive practice with creating and writing proofs is provided. The material studied in this course is widely used in upper-level courses. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MAT225.

MAT299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MAT301 - Introduction to Abstract Algebra (3 cr.)

A systematic development of algebraic structure. Methods of proof are emphasized, and proofs of fundamental results in algebra are discussed. Topics include groups, rings and fields. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MAT231.

MAT302 - Linear Algebra II (3 cr.)

Rigorous treatment of basic concepts, results and techniques of linear algebra for mathematics major and students who intend to continue their studies in the mathematical sciences. Topics include vector spaces over a field, linear transformations, inner product spaces, eigenvalues and canonical forms. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT202, MAT231 or equivalent knowledge.

MAT326 - Calculus III (0 to 4 cr.)

A continuation of MAT224 and 225. Topics include vectors in the plane, geometry of three dimensional space, vector functions in three space, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, Green's and Stokes' Theorems. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT225 or equivalent

MAT353 - Geometry (3 cr.)

A rigorous treatment of the foundations of Euclidean geometry and an introduction to hyperbolic geometry with emphasis on proofs. The history and philosophical implications of the discovery of non-Euclidean geometry are studied. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MAT231.

MAT361 - Probability and Statistics (3 cr.)

Introduction to probability and statistics. Topics include the elementary theory of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, sampling distributions, and estimation and hypothesis testing. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT326 or POI.

MAT362 - Statistical Inference (3 cr.)

Gives the student with a background in probability an introduction to statistical inference. Topics include the theory and application of parameter estimation and hypothesis testing. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT361

MAT365 - Probability Models (3 cr.)

Introduction to the theory of stochastic processes and the use of stochastic processes in modeling phenomena in such fields as engineering, management sciences, and the physical and social sciences. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisite: MAT361.

MAT397 - Core Mathematics Problem Seminar (3 cr.)

Required of all mathematics majors. Designed to round out and strengthen the student's knowledge of core mathematics and prepare the student for advanced work in mathematics. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, MAT301, MAT302, MAT326.

MAT399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MAT401 - Topics in Abstract Algebra (3 cr.)

Advanced topics in abstract algebra chosen to broaden, deepen, and help assimilate the knowledge acquired in linear and abstract algebra and prepare the student for further study in mathematics. (Fall of even-numbered years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT301, MAT302.

MAT411 - Mathematics Teaching Methods for Adolescence Education (4 cr.)

A course designed to familiarize the adolescence major with the content and processes of the New York State and National Council of Teachers of Mathematics standards. Students will gain knowledge of diverse teaching strategies and methods as well as assessment techniques. Additional emphasis will be given to classroom management, planning, grading, and incorporation of technology into the classroom, with multiple opportunities for less and unit plan presentations. Liberal arts. (Fall). Prerequisites: MAT301, MAT302, MAT326, MAT353, MAT361.

MAT423 - Complex Analysis (3 cr.)

Introduction to the basic theory of functions of a complex variable, including differentiation, integration, the Cauchy Theory and some of its applications. (Spring of odd-numbered years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT326.

MAT426 - Differential Equations (3 cr.)

An introduction to differential equations, their solution methods, and their applications. Topics include linear differential equations, series solutions, systems of differential equations, Laplace transforms, and applications to the physical sciences. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT326.

MAT428 - Foundations of Calculus (3 cr.)

This course revisits the theorems of Calculus I and II on limits and continuity, derivatives and integrals, and infinite series. The theorems will be studied in detail, and many will be proved. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT397.

MAT429 - Advanced Calculus (3 cr.)

A modern conceptual treatment of multivariable calculus. The course centers around the inverse function theorem, Green's theorem, and is presented via linear algebra. For students of mathematics and science. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT428.

MAT431 - Seminar in Set Theory (3 cr.)

Topics in Set Theory chosen to reflect the interests and abilities of the participants. Course may be repeated with departmental approval. (when staffing and demand permit). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Variable, depending on content.

MAT441 - Topology I (3 cr.)

The study of general topological spaces and their elementary point-set invariants. Topics include metric space topologies, basis and subbasis, continuous functions, connectedness, compactness and separation, applications to elementary analysis. (Fall of odd-numbered years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT202, MAT231, MAT301.

MAT460 - Topics in Applied Probability/Financial Mathematics (3 cr.)

Application of probability to topics in financial mathematics. Liberal arts. (Spring Even Years). Prerequisite: MAT326.

MAT472 - Dynamical Systems (3 cr.)

Physical systems are often modeled using systems of ordinary differential equations. We study the construction of these mathematical models, along with various techniques for analyzing their solutions. Liberal arts. (Spring of Even Years). Corequisite: MAT426 (may either be taken before or concurrently with this course). Prerequisites: MAT302 and MAT326.

MAT484 - Introduction to Combinatorics (3 cr.)

An introductory look at some of the more important topics in finite mathematics including methods of enumeration and graph theory. Many specific notions are defined and classical problems introduced so that general techniques may be applied to them. (Spring of even-numbered years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT202

MAT496 - Applied Instructional Practicum I (1 to 2 cr.)

Provides an opportunity for the student to assist in the instruction of a mathematics course under the supervision of the course instructor. A contract, approved by the chairperson, specifying the duties of the student will be filed in the departmental office. This course may be repeated as II, III or IV with the permission of the chairperson. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: by invitation only; GPA of 3.0 in mathematics or a grade of B or better in MAT397.

MAT499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MAT599 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MET199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MET299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MET399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MET499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MGM199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MGM280 - Principles of Management (3 cr.)

This course focuses on organizational and behavioral theories on the macro and micro levels applicable to all organizations: profit and nonprofit, manufacturing and services, and domestic and International. This course introduces students to the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling along with managerial skills and tools. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101, ECO101 or ECO110 or ECO111.

MGM299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MGM310 - Human Resource Management (3 cr.)

Theories, policies and procedures of human resource management and their practical implications. An overview of human resource functions such as strategic human resource planning, equal employment opportunity, job analysis, recruitment, selection, performance appraisal, compensation, training and employee development, employee rights, benefits, health and safety, and management-labor relations. Topics also include global human resource management and diversity management. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MGM280.

MGM311 - Organizational Behavior (3 cr.)

This course focuses on theories and practices related to the management of human behaviors in organizations, including individual, group, and organizational levels of analysis. Topics cover perception, learning, motivation, communication, leadership, ethics, careers, groups and interpersonal relationships, and organizational development and change. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MGM280.

MGM313 - Ethics in Business Management (3 cr.)

Introduces students to ethical issues and dilemmas in business management. Challenges facing management in confronting ethical dilemmas in organizations, operating home and abroad, will be examined and debated. Topics include: the moral philosophy governing managerial decision-making; the debate over profit-maximization and corporate social responsibility; ethical dimensions of diversity and affirmative action; ethical issues in the workplace with an emphasis on sexual harassment, office romance, privacy, health, and safety; downsizing, employee rights, information technology; and career issues related to women in management. This course will also explore ethical issues related to globalization such as child labor; environmental issues, sweatshops; bribery cross-cultural negotiations and conflict resolutions, as well as cross-cultural issues related to ethical differences across nations. (Fall). Liberal arts.

MGM314 - Labor Relations (3 cr.)

Topics in management-employee relations, such as the evolution of the collective bargaining relationship, legislative and regulatory influences on labor-management relations, and procedures for collective bargaining and contract implementation. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MGM280.

MGM315 - International Business Management (3 cr.)

Problems and policies of business enterprises within the international rather than the domestic context. Managerial decision making processes that characterize the interplay of diverse international environments and functional areas of business. Emphasis on the operations of multinational corporations. Student participation is achieved through case analyses and research on a foreign market. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: MGM280, MKE290.

MGM316 - Multinational Management (3 cr.)

Management of economic enterprises in foreign environments. Anthropological and psychological materials concerning the impact of culture on management functions. Foreign nations are studied through cases and research. (Fall/Spring).Prerequisite: MGM280.

MGM318 - Health Care Management (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to the concepts of total quality management, continuous quality improvement, organizational learning and quality policy management in health care settings. The goal is to give learners a foundation in the concepts of TQM including leadership, information requirements, quality planning, employee involvement, continuous process improvement tools, problem solving techniques and customer/client relationships. Topics to be covered include: building TQ systems--methods and tools; TQM for organizational leverage; hospital accreditation; and TQM and change management horizons--the impact of innovations. (Fall/Spring).

MGM350 - Introduction to Mathematical Modeling in Business (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of Operations Research. In particular, the course focuses on mathematical programming and optimization techniques, which develop and use mathematical models to solve complex business problems and support managerial decision making. The course will cover basic deterministic methods of operations research (linear programming, network flows, integer programming, transportation, assignment, and transshipment problems, project management (CPM/PERT), data envelopment analysis (DEA), multicriteria decision models) and their applications to resource allocation problems in business. The emphasis is on mathematical formulation of real world business problems, interpretation of computer solutions, and sensitivity analysis of optimal solutions. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ECO260, MAT221, MIS275 or MGM275, MGM280.

MGM399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MGM415 - Organization Theory (3 cr.)

This course covers organizational theories including organization-structure, design and effectiveness, authority and control, power and politics, culture, organizational learning, ethics, managerial decision making, and interaction with external and global environments. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: MGM280.

MGM434 - Gender and Management: Issues and Strategies (3 cr.)

This course covers issues and problems related to male and female advancement in the workplace as they relate to such topics as equitable treatments, barriers to advancement, careers, communication and interpersonal relationships, power and leadership, conflict, and ethics. Development of strategies for the advancement of women in the workplace will be emphasized. (Spring). Prerequisites: MGM280, MGM310.

MGM444 - Selected Topics in Management (1 to 4 cr.)

Selected management topics of particular current interest. The course may explore an area taken from another management course in greater detail and depth, or it may concentrate on an area of management not generally covered by existing courses. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: varies with topic.

MGM445 - Principles of Operations Management (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the design, management and control of manufacturing and service operations, which transform inputs into goods and services. The course presents a view of the primary activities of the operations function in organizations. Students will examine the major operations management decisions and the basic tradeoffs associated with them. They will also learn to identify and quantify operating characteristics of different manufacturing and service systems and apply a variety of techniques and quantitative methods used by operations managers to optimize the performance of their operations. Topics include product and service design, capacity planning, process selection and design, facility location and layout, supply chain management, forecasting, operations planning and control, inventory management and MRP, quality management, statistical process control, process analysis and improvement. (Spring). Prerequisite: ACC202, MIS275 or MGM275, ECO260, MGM280.

MGM490 - Strategic Management (3 cr.)

This course covers business unit and corporate strategies in organizations. Topics include internal and external environment, industry attractiveness, strategic planning processes, competitive forces, competitive advantages, strategy formulation and implementation, and portfolio analysis. Covers both domestic and international organizations, and integrates various functional areas of management, marketing, accounting, finance, economics and other related disciplines such as professional writing (for example business case analysis). (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MGM280, MIS275 or MGM275, MKE290, FIN355, BUS388, BUS489 (may be taken concurrently), and last semester senior standing.

MGM499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MIS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MIS275 - Business Applications and Information Systems (3 cr.)

This course will provide the student with an in-depth understanding and working knowledge of the most popular business software with special emphasis on MS Office. Through a variety of hands-on exercises and minicases, students will utilize Excel spreadsheets and Access databases to explore information technology impacts on the core business disciplines (accounting, marketing, human resource management, operations management, and finance). We will provide the student with an understanding of information systems terminology, the ethics of information collection and use, and the ability to determine what information should be presented to various levels of management. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

MIS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MIS302 - Data Communications (3 cr.)

This course introduces business students to the subject of computer networks and the use of computer networks in business applications. The course starts with the fundamentals of data communications and networking and includes topics such as client-server networks, network hardware and software, the Internet, distributed computing, and key issues in network management. In addition the course covers some legacy networks but focuses primarily on modern high-speed networks used in business communications. (Fall). Prerequisite: MIS275.

MIS303 - Introduction to Business Application Programming (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental programming theories and concepts necessary to create software applications that address the information needs of an organization. Introduces business students to the design, implementation, and testing of programs. Topics include class definition, methods, data types, control structures, and file-based and interactive input/output. Provides an overview of industry-proven software-development principles, and outlines the contribution that business professionals make to the program-development process. (Fall). Prerequisite: MIS275.

MIS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MIS401 - Systems Analysis & Design (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the systems development process. Students with information technology skills will learn to analyze and design information systems. The topics include structured and object oriented analysis and design, modern modeling methodologies and tools. The students will work on systems analysis and design projects. (Spring). Prerequisite: MIS303.

MIS402 - Database Management (3 cr.)

This course will introduce students to the fundamentals of database management. The topics will include the study of data environments, the evolution of database technology, database concepts and uses, different levels and types of data models and modeling tools, database design and query processing, structured and object design approaches, and the use of CASE tools and the Data Base Management Systems. Students will participate in database design projects. Other topics address emerging database trends and opportunities. (Fall). Prerequisite: MIS303.

MIS403 - Business Intelligence (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to topics in Business Intelligence and Decision Support Systems. The students will study the tools and techniques needed to build interactive, computer-based systems used to support managerial decision making. The topics will include business intelligence, decision making models and DSS, data warehousing, data mining and artificial intelligence technologies for decision support. (Fall or Spring). Prerequisites: MIS275.

MIS404 - Information Systems Project Management (3 cr.)

This course provides advanced students an opportunity to engage in the development of a significant information system. The student will work in a high performance team and learn and use skills that include project management, management of the information systems function and the systems development skills learned in prior courses. (Spring). Prerequisites: MIS303 or MGM303.

MIS405 - Enterprise Information Systems (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes the theory and practice of information technology implementation in an organization. The student will be exposed to a wide variety of approaches, including multi-tiered client-server systems, enterprise computing, electronic commerce systems, concurrency control and crash recovery, online transaction processing, and security and privacy issues for management. These topics will be covered in the context of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems like SAP wherever possible. (Spring). Prerequisites: MIS275 or MGM275.

MIS410 - Electronic Business and Web Site Design (3 cr.)

This course is designed to familiarize you with current and emerging electronic business models and technologies. This is a course for students who are interested in web programming, database management, and systems design. The course combines fundamental ideas and concepts of e-business with hands-on exercises based on Internet technologies. The topics include e-business revenue models, Internet and Web technology infrastructure, web site management, search engines, payment systems, and security. The specific technologies that we will learn and implement through hands-on exercises are HTML, PHP, and MySQL. By the end of the course, you should understand concepts of e-business and acquire essential technical skills of building functional web sites. (Spring). Prerequisite: MIS275 or POI.

MIS412 - E-Healthcare: Models and Processes (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental models, theories, and concepts in e-health care information systems that address the information needs for the health care industry. Recognizing the emerging trends of e-health care paradigm and practices, the course will introduce students to the topics including e-health records, e-public health information systems, e-medicine, e-diagnosis support systems, e-health intelligence, security, and strategies. The course provides an overview of current and emerging e-health solutions and their potential capabilities to improve health care outcomes. (Spring). Prerequisites: MIS275, NUR341.

MIS418 - Foundations of Cybercrime and Cyber Security (3 cr.)

This course provides students with the fundamental skills to analyze methods criminals use to commit crimes in cyberspace, and to develop mitigation strategies to protect the organization from cybercrime. The course covers various technologies and methods needed to detect, investigate and prevent cybercrime. Moreover, students will learn how companies and law enforcement agencies are responding to the dangers these crimes present. Concepts learned in this course will be directly applicable to careers in information assurance and cyber security. (Spring). Prerequisites: MIS275, MIS302, and MIS440.

MIS419 - Information Assurance and Network Control (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental models, theories, and concepts in information assurance and cyber security that address the organizational needs to securely protect information assets from harm. Recognizing the emerging trends of information assurance and security, the course will introduce students to topics including information security priority, configuration management, contingency planning, and information assurance architecture, policies, and strategies. The course provides a holistic overview of latest topics in information assurance and potential managerial and technical controls to improve the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data and information. (Fall). Prerequisites: MIS275, MIS302.

MIS420 - Data Privacy and Security (3 cr.)

This course provides an introduction to the field of data privacy and security. The issues related to data/information privacy and security will look at both from an individual and an organizational perspective. Fundamental models, theories, and concepts in data/information privacy and security along with historical, current and emerging trends, techniques and tools in the field will be introduced. This course will provide an overview of not only the technical aspects, but also the organizational and legal issues relevant to the field. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: MIS275, MIS302, MIS440.

MIS440 - Management Information Systems (3 cr.)

Modern organizations regard information as a critical resource that needs to be managed effectively. Managers must understand the important role of information systems in improving business operation and the management decision-making process. The approach to information systems in this course is from a managerial/business perspective. While some of the course addresses the technical side of information systems, the emphasis is put on the strategic role of information technology in solving business problems, gaining competitive advantage. supporting business operations and managerial decision making, and the use of Internet for electronic commerce and enterprise collaboration. The topics covered in this course include the strategic role of information systems, evolution of information systems software, managing data resources, telecommunications and networks, electronic commerce and electronic business, redesigning the organization with information systems, systems lifecycle approach, prototyping, CASE tools, decision support systems, information systems security and control, security and the Internet and privacy issues. (Spring). Prerequisites: MGM280, MGM275 or MIS275.

MIS444 - Selected Topics in Management Information Systems (1 to 4 cr.)

Selected management topics of a particular current interest. The course may explore an area taken from another management course in greater detail and depth, or it may concentrate on an area of management not generally covered by existing courses. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites: MGM275 or MIS275 or POI.

MIS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MKE290 - Principles of Marketing (3 cr.)

Basic problems in marketing management and the marketing mix elements of product, price and promotion and distribution are presented in the context of a dynamic global environment. The impact of the legal, political, social, ethical, technological, economic, and competitive factors upon marketing activities are discussed. Includes Marketing Plan project. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101; ECO101 or ECO110 or ECO111.

MKE321 - Principles of Advertising (3 cr.)

Advertising from the advertiser's perspective. Explores advertising strategy, media strategy, creative ad development, advertising research and budgeting. Includes advertising campaign project. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE322 - Sales Force Management (3 cr.)

Application of management theories to the sales force, with particular emphasis on sales force organization, selection, recruitment, training, motivation, compensation, supervision and performance evaluation. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE323 - Retail Store Management (3 cr.)

Introduction to technical and theoretical practices of retail management for both physical "bricks and mortar" stores and Internet retail operations. Overview of organizational structure, merchandising practices and procedures, promotional activities, store planning and control. (Fall). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE324 - Public Relations in the Promotion Mix (3 cr.)

Students will learn about Integrated Marketing Communications and how public relations fits into the Promotion Mix, about dealing with the various publics of an organization, and about the legal and ethical dimensions of PR. Students will also learn the basics of print, broadcast, Internet, and social media public relations and they will gain hands-on experience in preparing a PR campaign for a "client." (Every 3rd semester). Prerequisites: ENG101 and MKE290.

MKE325 - Marketing Channels Strategy (3 cr.)

Operation of channels of distribution from the manufacturer's point of view. Physical distribution system and business logistics process. Transportation, storage, order processing, location analysis and operation of functional middlemen. (Spring). Prerequisites: MKE290.

MKE326 - International Marketing (3 cr.)

Environmental factors and adaptation of marketing strategy components marketers should consider in entering foreign markets. Includes hands-on project. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE328 - Services Marketing (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to principles, concepts, theories, analytical procedures, techniques, and models addressing the distinctions between the marketing of goods and the marketing of services. Three different perspectives of services marketing are addressed: consumers' expectations and perceptions; businesses' service delivery operations, channels of distribution, and marketing; and the integration of the consumer and business perspectives with special emphasis on relationship marketing. Strategies and tactics designed to increase marketing effectiveness and operational efficiency within this important sector of the economy are also addressed. (Spring).

MKE334 - Entrepreneurship and Intrapreneurship (3 cr.)

Principles of entrepreneurship are examined from two perspectives: the new start-up firm, and intrapreneurship in established companies. Students will learn to develop a business plan for a new business idea. Topics include legal forms of business ownership, identifying new venture opportunities, projecting financial requirements and alternative sources of financing, developing a marketing strategy, organizing and managing the business, and more. (Fall). Prerequisites: ACC202, MGM280, MKE290.

MKE335 - Marketing Research (3 cr.)

The various elements of the marketing research process are examined, including problem definition, the determination of information required to address the issue, research designs, measurement instruments, data collection methods, data analysis and the research report. Includes hands-on research project. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ECO260, MKE290.

MKE336 - Small Business Management (3 cr.)

This course is oriented toward providing students with principles and theoretical background to manage a small business effectively. The functional areas of management, marketing, accounting and finance are examined to provide insight in how to operate the business on a daily basis. Students will have the opportunity to participate in problem-solving, field projects, or case analyses related to problems of small businesses. (Spring). Prerequisites: ACC202, MGM280, MKE290.

MKE338 - Canadian Entrepreneurship & Innovation (3 cr.)

This course will focus on the entrepreneurial environment in Canada, the factors and programs that contribute to, or are obstacles to, innovation and to the successful development of Canadian entrepreneurial products and organizations. Students will learn about Canada's leading entrepreneurs, their entrepreneurial qualities, and their innovative products, services, and organizations. (Every 3rd Semester).

MKE380 - Creativity Process in Marketing (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the major theories and models of creativity, traits of creative people, and exercises to help students realize their creative potential by applying creativity techniques to general and marketing problems. A hands-on team creativity project and class presentations are included. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE385 - New Product Development (3 cr.)

This course introduces the principles of the new product development process in the context of a firm's overall marketing strategy. The new product development process includes the identification of opportunities, idea generation, concept evaluation, design, testing, and launching of new products. (Every Fourth Semester, Spring). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE399 - Independent Study (1 to 12 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall & Spring).

MKE401 - Interactive Marketing and E-Commerce (3 cr.)

This course focuses on E-commerce and interactive marketing methods of advertising, selling, distribution, and customer relationship management. All interactive media, with particular emphasis on the Internet, Worldwide Web, and other electronic technological advancements, will be introduced. Students will learn how interactive marketing differs from traditional marketing and how interactive marketing and E-commerce fits into an organization's marketing promotional mix and marketing strategy in both business-to-customer or business-to-business contexts. The course makes use of lectures, readings, guest speakers, and a student project. (Every 3rd semester, Fall) Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE402 - Procurement (3 cr.)

This course covers the steps in the procurement process, from cost benefit analysis and goal formulation, to sourcing options, developing evaluation criteria, metrics, supplier selection, negotiation, and supply laws and ethics. The course also discusses global supply, public supply, capital goods, services, supplier relations, and strategy in purchasing/supply management. (Every 3rd semester, Spring). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE410 - Franchising in the US and Canada (3 cr.)

Students learn about the evolution of franchising, different types of franchising, franchisor and franchisee obligations, government regulations and legal issues related to the franchise agreement, and are exposed to a comparative view of franchising in the US, Canada, and other parts of the world. (Spring). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE421 - Consumer Behavior (3 cr.)

Determinants of human behavior that impinge on the individual's role as a consumer. Course covers models of consumer behavior, the decision making process, and the various social and psychological factors influencing these processes. (Fall). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE422 - Business to Business Marketing (3 cr.)

Concepts of marketing strategy applied to business-to-business marketing situations in the context of a dynamic global environment. Topics include marketing planning, market segmentation, buyer behavior and the marketing mix elements. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MKE290.

MKE442 - Selected Marketing Topics (3 cr.)

Seminar course offered occasionally covering advanced marketing topics of particular temporal interest. (Occasionally). Prerequisite: MKE290.

MKE443 - Selected Topics in Entrepreneurship (3 cr.)

Seminar offered occasionally on advanced entrepreneurship topics of current interest and importance. The course explores entrepreneurship in greater depth and allows for the exploration of an area taken from another entrepreneurship course in greater detail or it may concentrate on an area of entrepreneurship not generally covered in existing courses: Issues of Family Businesses, New Product Development, and Marketing for Small Business. (Every Other Year). Prerequisites: MKE290 and MGM280 or POI.

MKE480 - Marketing Strategy (3 cr.)

Proper selection of market targets and development of most profitable marketing program. Developed within the program are specific pricing, distribution, product and promotional programs. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: MKE290, MKE335.

MKE499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MLC192 - Introduction to World Literature in Translation (3 cr.)

An introduction to poetry, fiction, and drama selected from primarily non-English-speaking cultures. (Fall/Winter). Liberal arts.

MLC199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MLC220 - Latin American and Spanish Literature (in English) (3 cr.)

Study of Latin American and Spanish literary works in translation, examining representative texts, authors, genres or themes to promote better understanding of these cultures, both in the past and present. Liberal arts. (Summer). Prerequisites: another literary course in English or Spanish, or POI.

MLC245 - Latin American Culture Through Films (3 cr.)

Study of films as they represent Latin American social, cultural and political practices and concepts. We will analyze images in films from various countries or in terms of common themes. Taught in English. (Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

MLC250 - Gender and Sexuality in Hispanic Film (3 cr.)

An introduction to the representation of gender and sexuality in films of Spain and Spanish speaking Latin America. Liberal arts. (Fall).

MLC260 - Topics in Latin American Art (3 cr.)

Examination of the impact of historical events on sculpture, architecture, ceramics and painting in different periods of Latin American history. Liberal arts. (Once Per Year).

MLC299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MLC340 - European Films (3 cr.)

A series of films centered around a topic or topics which may include: relationships between the sexes; race relationships; war, social and political agenda; literature and film; etc. Films would be chosen from various countries. Literature, essays and articles will accompany the films. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: junior standing

MLC399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MLC499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Summer).

MLS501 - Holistic Leadership: Seminar in Theoretical Foundations (3 cr.)

A focused survey of foundational theory and research in leadership. Special emphasis is placed on the development of leadership as it relates to personal behavior, the psychodynamics of personal development, learning styles, communication, and cultural and psycho-social patterns. This course focuses on the application of personal development theories to one's self to build increased competencies in self-assessment and monitoring, personal reflection and journaling, learning approaches, and application of theories to one's personal leadership development process. (Fall/Spring/Summer).

MLS510 - Studies in Leadership Communication (3 cr.)

Intended for individuals in professional, business or government positions desiring to improve their knowledge and skills necessary in leadership roles. Specific emphasis is given to concepts and problems of leadership at various levels and in a wide variety of situations. (Fall).

MLS511 - Systems, Change and the Dynamics of Complexity (3 cr.)

This course is designed to help us develop our own pictures and understandings of systems by learning to critically question the assumptions and paradigms of both our own organization and leadership views and those whose work we will read. Students will be introduced to the fundamental questions and theoretical approaches in the study of complex systems. We will consider the relationship between theory and practice as we develop a critical discourse, challenge knowledge claims, and move toward the design and administration of complex systems with multiple feedback effects, long time delays, and nonlinear responses to our decisions. Students will learn to visualize organizations in terms of the structures and policies that create complex dynamics and regulate performance. (Spring/Summer).

MLS515 - Leadership Analysis, Thinking and Planning (3 cr.)

This course is an interactive seminar in which students design a personal leadership portfolio and developmental plan. Students analyze different leadership styles and actions and their own leadership strengths and career aspirations. Coursework focuses on in-class and outside of class action learning and developmental agendas, culminating in a leadership profile and leadership development action plan. (Spring).

MLS537 - Leading and Learning in Groups (3 cr.)

This course is an applied workshop focusing on developing competencies in creating learning environments for groups to enhance group effectiveness. These competencies include facilitation, communication, learning activity design and implementation, and best case practices. Students will be exposed to learning theories, the socio-dynamics of team formation and learaning communities. Specific communication and facilitation techniques will be learned and employed in developing and delivering learning modules in and outside the classroom. (Spring/Summer).

MLS538 - Brokering Alliances and Networks (3 cr.)

Students will actively participate in learning several methods for forming sustainable public sector, corporate or small business, non-profit organizational and community based relationships. Each student will develop and test a strategic alliance and network action plan for an individual and organization. The course includes research into desired objectives and outcomes, recent literature on performance based needs, and market/consumer/client-service issues. This is an interactive course designed to provide meaningful application of theory to the day-to-day practice of stakeholder and mutually beneficial relationship management in a regulatory and organizationally networked environment. This class is conducted as a seminar-workshop intended as a hands-on, experiential learning experience. The students will be exposed to collaborative alliance development and networking methodologies and techniques that can be used to form meaningful relationships between organizations across organizational sectors and among individuals. The course is research intensive, interactive, and based on a team approach to working and learning through the application of models to real situations. (Winter).

MLS544 - Selected Topics in Administration and Leadership (1 to 6 cr.)

Selected topics which will cover Administration and Leadership topics of current interest of developing theory. These courses could be interdisciplinary and integrate topics from a variety of disciplines. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisites will vary according to the topic.

MLS552 - Program Evaluation and Grant Writing (3 cr.)

This course engages students in a review of public administration, non-profit and private agency issues and agendas for the purpose of understanding varying contexts for program evaluation and grant writing. Students conduct research and analysis of different approaches and techniques for program evaluation and design a best practice program evaluation process and evaluative tools using case studies. (Summer).

MLS580 - Seminar in Public Policy (3 cr.)

Focus will be on policy, theory, policy making and policy analysis, different rationales for government action generally; how different types of policy are made; and a detailed look at the problems facing those who try to assess the worth of public policy. (Spring). Prerequisites: must be matriculated in the MS-Leadership program.

MLS581 - Ethics in Leadership (3 cr.)

This course will provide students with an historic perspective on ethics based in varying philosophies, curtural and social contexts. The most prominent guidelines and theories for making ethical judgments will be explored in the course. Students will also examine ethics codes for various professions and the emerging legal issues governing ethics in American society. Students will consider the importance of creating a social context that emphasizes ethical values and behavior. The course will also focus on the types of practical issues requiring ethical sensitivity in a diverse and changing social structure using case studies and ethical issues exploration. (Fall).

MLS585 - Research Methods and Writing (3 cr.)

This class provides an overview of research methods and engages students in the process of formulating a research problem, conducting literature reviews, and designing a research project. Students will explore different types of research; the varying processes of conducting research based on the type of research question and the research methods; the criteria for good research; and ethical concerns in doing research using human subjects. Students will identify the primary method to be used for their thesis. (Spring).

MLS590 - Master Thesis (3 cr.)

This course is the capstone work for students who are completing their master's degree in Leadership. Students have several thesis options from which to choose to complete the course/program requirements: Self-Assessment Action Research Portfolio Thesis, Analysis and Assessment Research Thesis, Best Practices Professional Project Applied Research Thesis, Case Study Applied Research Thesis, Original Research Thesis. The course provides thesis completion guidance and feedback on progress towards the thesis. (Summer). Prerequisite: MLS585.

MLS591 - Applied Leadership Internship (3 cr.)

This course is intended to provide students with experience in applying leadership theory to a real work environment. Each student must select an appropriate site for the internship and identify an on-site supervisor. Students work with a faculty sponsor and the on-site supervisor to both design a learning and action plan and select work experiences that will support that plan. Students spend 120-150 hours at the internship site and provide periodic and/or summary reports on the outcomes of their experience. The course is appropriate for students with little or no managerial level work experience. (Winter/Spring/Summer/Fall).

MLS592 - Applied Leadership Observational Study (3 cr.)

This course provides a framework for students who have some managerial level work experience and/or are currently employed to study the contexts and conditions that influence leadership decisions and actions in a real work environment. Each student will indentify one or more leaders who demonstrate competencies and actions that are aspirational to the student and are willing to participate in the study. In collaboration with a faculty sponsor, the student will design a structured process for observation, discussion and inquiry for one-on-one interaction with the leader(s). Students spend time weekly observing in the organizational setting and/or meeting with leaders, maintain a detailed journal of these observations, discussions and inquiries, and submit a summary analysis of their learning. (Winter/Spring/Summer/Fall).

MTS101 - Introduction to ROTC & U.S. Army (1 cr.)

Discussion of the customs, traditions, branches, organization, as well as the many changes in the roles and mission of the Army of the 21st century. Includes a non-credit lab. (Fall). Corequisite: MTS103.

MTS102 - Introduction to Military Skills & Followership (1 cr.)

Development of basic skills of an Army officer, including navigation, communication, and problem solving. Dimensions of leadership values, attributes, skills, and actions are explored. (Spring). Corequisite: MTS103. Prerequisite: MTS101.

MTS103 - Army Physical Fitness Training Lab I (1 cr.)

A vigorously conducted workout designed to improve muscular strength/endurance, cardiovascular fitness, improve body composition and flexibility. Students will receive instruction and be evaluated through application, demonstration and individual progress. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: MTS101 in the fall and MTS102 in the spring.

MTS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MTS201 - Leadership & Team Development (2 cr.)

Learning and application of ethics-based leadership skills that develop individual abilities and contribute to effective team building. Development of oral presentation, writing, and coordination of group efforts. (Fall). Corequisite: MTS203. Prerequisite: MTS102.

MTS202 - Individual and Team Development (2 cr.)

Techniques for training/counseling others as an aspect of continued leadership development. Includes risk and safety management assessments and planning for individual and team safety. (Spring). Corequisite: MTS203. Prerequisite: MTS201.

MTS203 - Army Physical Fitness Training Lab II (1 cr.)

Supervised practical experience for Military Studies students. Students will participate in, plan and instruct vigorously conducted workouts on a weekly basis that are designed to build muscular strength/endurance, cardiovascular fitness, improve body composition and flexibility. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: MTS201 in the fall and MTS202 in the spring.

MTS299 - Independent Study (1 to 4 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

MTS301 - Leadership & Training in Small Organizations (3 cr.)

Series of opportunities to lead small groups, receive personal assessments, and lead in complex situations. Plan and conduct training to develop leadership skills. (Fall). Corequisite: MTS303. Prerequisite: MTS202.

MTS302 - Leadership in Changing Environments (3 cr.)

Presentation of intense situational leadership challenges to build awareness and skills in leading tactical operations up to platoon level. Review of aspects of combat, stability, and support operations. Examine importance of ethical decisions in a positive climate that enhances team performance. (Spring). Corequisite: MTS303. Prerequisite: MTS301

MTS303 - Army Physical Fitness Training Lab III (1 cr.)

Supervised practical experience for Military Studies students. Students will plan, rehearse, execute, monitor and evaluate vigorously conducted workouts on a weekly basis that are designed to build muscular strength/endurance, cardiovascular fitness, improve body composition and flexibility. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: MTS201 in the fall and MTS202 in the spring.

MTS304 - Military History: United States Army 1607-Present (3 cr.)

The development of the U.S. Army from the colonial period to the present. Topics include battle analysis, innovations in military doctrine/technology, and leadership dimensions in battle. The course will also emphasize strategic, operational, and tactical synchronization throughout the nation's wars. (Fall, Spring, Winter).

MTS305 - Military History: World War I (3 cr.)

This course will examine the origins, tactics, operations and strategies that made this the first modern war. Military and civilian leadership will be examined and the use of modern technology on the battlefield. The peace process that ended the war and its consequences will be thoroughly explored. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MTS306 - Military History: World War II (3 cr.)

This course will examine the Second World War. Its origins, the tactics/strategies that the allied and axis nations used to prosecute the war and the results of these decisions will be investigated. The decisions of the military and civilian leadership will be analyzed as well as the subsequent outcomes of these actions that still influence us today. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MTS307 - Military History: The Cold War - Korea to Vietnam (3 cr.)

This course will examine the origins of the involvement of the United States in Korea and Vietnam Wars. Military and civilian leadership will be examined in light of their successes and failures. Tactical, operational and strategic use of American forces in combat will be analyzed. Application of the lessons learned and the historical significance will be examined. (Spring). Liberal arts.

MTS308 - Military History: Afghanistan and Iraq Wars (3 cr.)

This course will examine the origins of America's most recent conflicts. The tactics and strategy used in both areas of operation will be dissected. Military as well as civilian leadership will be examined in relation to its prosecution. The end state of both campaigns will be investigated, as well as future implications of these wars. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MTS310 - Military History: French and Indian Wars (3 cr.)

This course will examine the military conflict between the Native Americans, the European nations of England and France and their colonies in the 17th and 18th century in North America. The policies, strategies, operations and tactics of the wars, campaigns and battles will be studied, as well as the peace treaties. (Fall/Spring).

MTS399 - Independent Study (1 to 4 cr.)

Project indivudually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall, Spring).

MTS401 - Leadership Challenges & Goal Setting (3 cr.)

Plan, conduct, and evaluate activities. Assess organizational cohesion under stress and develop strategies for improvement. Develop confidence in skills to lead people and manage resources. (Fall). Corequisite: MTS403. Prerequisite: MTS302

MTS402 - Leadership in a Complex World (3 cr.)

Exploration of the dynamics of leading in the complex situations of current military operations in the contemporary operating environment. Examination of differences in customs and courtesies, military law, principles of war, and rules of engagement in the face of international terrorism. Exploration of aspects of interacting with non-government organizations, civilians on the battlefield, and host nation support. (Spring). Corequisite: MTS403. Prerequisite: MTS401

MTS403 - Army Physical Fitness Training Lab 4 (1 cr.)

Practical experience for Military Studies students in leadership and supervision. Students will supervise the planning/execution and monitor and evaluate workouts/fitness test on a weekly basis that are designed to build muscular strength/endurance, cardiovascular fitness, improve body composition and flexibility. (Fall/Spring). Corequisites: MTS401 in the fall and MTS402 in the spring.

MTS405 - Military History: Battles and Campaigns (3 cr.)

This course will examine the battles and campaigns in American military history that have proved to be decisive. The strategy/tactics developed by the civilian/military leadership will be explored. Operational/tactical innovations and challenges will be examined in respect to the battle/campaign. (Fall/Spring).

MTS406 - Military History: American Military Leaders (3 cr.)

This course will examine the military commanders who have led Americans from the colonial period to today. Their unique styles of leadership, approach to training and employment of "citizen soldiers" on countless battlefields will be discussed. Their successes as well as failures will be presented for review and consideration. (Fall/Spring).

MTS407 - Military History: Case Studies in Military History (3 cr.)

This course will examine military operations through various case studies of actions since the beginning of World War II. Vignettes will show students the impact of decisiveness, flexibility, and the principles of war as well as the problems inherent in special situations such as airborne, air assault, river crossings and fighting in urban areas. (Fall/Spring).

MTS408 - Military History: United States Air Force (3 cr.)

This course will examine the battles and campaigns that the United States Air Force has participated in. Operational and tactical innovations and changes in technology will be looked at on how they influenced their operations throughout the 20th century to today. (Fall/Spring).

MTS409 - Military History: United States Navy (3 cr.)

This course will examine the battles and campaigns that the United States Navy has participated in. Operational and tactical innovations and challenges will be looked at on how they influenced the battle/campaign. (Fall/Spring).

MTS410 - Military History: United States Marine Corps (3 cr.)

This course will examine the battles and campaigns that the United States Marine Corps has participated in. Operational and tactical innovations and challenges of new technology will be looked at as well as how this elite force has been used in peace and war. (Fall/Spring).

MTS499 - Independent Study (0 to 4 cr.)

Project indivudually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall, Spring).

MUS100 - Introductory Music Symposium (0 or 1 cr.)

An overview of the B.A. in Music and Music Concentration (Education) at SUNY Plattsburgh and a broader look at the field of music. Students will be introduced to the music program through a series of presentations by music faculty and guest lecturers. Topics include areas of expertise such as performance, composition, arranging, music technology, Alexander Technique, the business of music, music recording, music therapy, music management and working with non-profit organizations. Pass/Fail. Course required of Music Majors and Music Concentration (Education) students. (Fall). Liberal arts.

MUS101 - Introduction to the Alexander Technique (1 to 2 cr.)

The Alexander Technique is a method for improved ease and freedom of movement, balance, support and coordination. Group and individual instruction in the principles and practice of the Alexander Technique. Designed to give students a practical introduction to the Technique with a view to applying it to both everyday tasks (e.g., walking, sitting, bending), back care, as well as more specialized activities within the disciplines of music, theatre and sports (e.g., playing a musical instrument, singing, theatre voice work, and running). (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MUS110 - Music Appreciation (3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the elements, periods, genres, masterworks, and personalities in Western art music from the Renaissance to the present. Attention is given to how music is reflective of its historical, social, and cultural context. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

MUS111 - World Music (3 cr.)

This course examines a variety of world cultures, predominantly non-Western, and music styles associated with those cultures. Discussion will be based on a theory of "ethnic" vs. "folk" music; separate discussions will focus on art music of various cultures. Emphasis will be on how features of the history, institutions, society and culture influence the musical elements of the various music cultures studied. Rather than aspiring to comprehensive world coverage, this course will focus on several regional or national music cultures (such as those of Africa, the Middle East, or Japan), allowing more indepth consideration of music in the societies studied. Topics include musical making from a cultural perspective, elements of music, music as symbolic action, and the ethnographic context of music. Traditional folk, tribal and religious values will be discussed as pertinent to each culture. Discussion of the various social and cultural settings of these regions will be an important component of the course. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts.

MUS112 - Jazz History (3 cr.)

Survey of jazz, from its roots in Africa through 19th century minstrelsy to late 20th century fusion of electronics, rock, and traditional elements. Rudiments of music such as notation, improvisation, rhythm, melody, harmony. Development of listening skills, identification of instruments, discussion of the various styles of jazz and the American society in which it has developed. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

MUS113 - Music in Canadian Cultures (3 cr.)

Overview of music making in Canada from the seventeenth century to the present. Discussion of the cultural roles of these types of music in Canadian life. Examination of representative classical, folk, and popular works. Survey of basic elements of music, significant listening component. (Every Other Summer). Liberal arts.

MUS114 - American Pop: North and South (3 cr.)

Survey of the music that developed in the Americas in the twentieth century as a result of the syncretism of European and African culture. The course will cover music from North America, the Caribbean, and South America. Among the styles covered in the course are rhythm and blues, rock and roll, country western, hip-hop, salsa, and various musical genres from the Caribbean and South America. Development of listening skills, identification of instruments, discussion of the various styles and social settings of American, Afro-Caribbean, and South American music. (Annually). Liberal arts.

MUS115 - Musical Theatre (3 cr.)

A survey of representative works in the American musical theater, with emphasis on the interaction of musical and dramatic values. Musicals will be considered in relation to other performance traditions, and as a reflection of social and cultural trends and attitudes. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MUS116 - Latin American and Caribbean Music (3 cr.)

This course examines a variety of Latin American and Caribbean music styles. The manner in which the African/European musical syncretism developed within a particular country will be emphasized in the course. Various traditional African tribal and religious values will be discussed when pertinent. Among the styles covered will be the Cuban son and rumba, the merengue of the Dominican Republic, Brazilian samba, Jamaican reggae, the soca and calypso of Trinidad, the tango of Argentina, and various styles of Mexican music. Latin and Caribbean music as it developed in North America as well as lesser-known but important styles such as the Haitian konpa-direct and the plena and bomba from Puerto Rico will also be addressed in this course. Discussion of the various social and cultural settings of Latin American and Caribbean countries will be an important component of the course. (Once/Twice Per Year). Liberals arts.

MUS120 - Fundamental Musicianship (0 to 3 cr.)

A course in music fundamentals with emphasis on music reading and notation. Introduction to sightsinging, ear training, and keyboard skills. Option for proficiency exam (0 credits). (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

MUS126 - Aural Skills I (0 to 1 cr.)

An aural approach to the study of materials of music studied in Music Theory I, including scales, intervals, chord quality, melody, rhythm, harmonic function and form. Development of performance skills including ear training, sight singing, keyboard harmony, elementary conducting patterns, and rhythmic reading. Includes self study in aural skills using ear training computer software. Course is taken concurrently with Music Theory I. (Fall). Corequisite: MUS130. Prerequisite: MUS120.

MUS130 - Music Theory I (3 cr.)

The study of species counterpoint in two and three parts. These exercises in elementary composition form the foundation for future studies in the diatonic harmonic system. Introduction to music analysis. Lecture with Aural Skills I taken concurrently. Liberal arts. (Fall). Co-requisite: MUS126. Prerequisite: MUS120.

MUS131 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility, and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS132 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS131. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI.

MUS141 - Applied String Instruments (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing ensemble (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. May take multiple sections concurrently. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS142 - Applied String Instruments (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing ensemble (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. May take multiple sections concurrently. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS151 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing ensemble (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS152 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS151. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS161 - Applied Woodwind Instruments (title varies) (0 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing ensemble (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS162 - Applied Woodwind Instruments (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS161. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI

MUS171 - Applied Brass Instruments (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing ensemble (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS172 - Applied Brass Instruments (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS171. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS181 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing ensemble (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. May take multiple sections concurrently. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS182 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Individualized instruction to develop musicianship, technical facility and knowledge of the standard repertoire. All students enrolled in instrumental or vocal instruction are required to: participate in a performing ensemble (with advisement from a music faculty member); attend periodic Music Performance Classes; perform as a soloist once each semester; serve as a concert volunteer once each semester; and attend five performances presented or sponsored by the Music Department. May take multiple sections concurrently. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS191 - Applied Composition (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Individual study of the techniques and materials of composing and arranging. Continuation of the projects and processes introduced in MUS323. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS192 - Applied Composition (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS191. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MUS226 - Aural Skills II (1 cr.)

A continuation of Aural Skills I, incorporating materials from Music Theory II, including further work in scales, intervals, chord quality, melody, rhythm, harmonic function and form. Further development of performance skills including ear training, sight singing, keyboard harmony, elementary conducting patterns, and rhythmic reading. Includes self study in aural skills using ear training computer software. Course is taken concurrently with Music Theory II. (Spring). Corequisite: MUS220. Prerequisite: MUS130.

MUS230 - Music Theory II (3 cr.)

Introduction to the diatonic harmonic system, including seventh chords, composition in four voices and the study of smaller musical forms. Lecture with Aural Skills II taken concurrently. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Co-requisite: MUS226. Prerequisite: MUS130.

MUS231 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS131. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS232 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS131. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS233 - Voice Class (3 cr.)

Group instruction in singing, designed to develop historical and technical knowledge of the instrument, elementary performance techniques, elementary ensemble performance, reading ability, and critical listening skills. Designed for all students. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MUS241 - Applied String Instruments (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS141. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS242 - Applied String Instruments (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS141. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS251 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS151. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS252 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS151. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS261 - Applied Woodwind Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS161. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS262 - Applied Woodwind Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS161. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS271 - Applied Brass Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS171. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS272 - Applied Brass Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS171. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS281 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS181. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS282 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS181. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS283 - Piano Class (0 to 3 cr.)

Group instruction in piano, designed to develop historical and technical knowledge of the instrument, elementary performance techniques, elementary ensemble performance and reading ability. Designed for all students. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MUS291 - Applied Composition (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS191. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS292 - Applied Composition (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS191. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS293 - Guitar Class (3 cr.)

Group instruction in guitar, designed to develop historical and technical knowledge of the instrument, elementary performance techniques, elementary ensemble performance and reading ability. Designed for all students. Student must supply own guitar. Liberal arts.

MUS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MUS301 - History of Western Music: Antiquity - 1750 (3 cr.)

Study of style, form, genre, compositional techniques, representative composers and repertoire from Antiquity through the Baroque period. Attention is given to the relation of music to the culture and social institition of each era. Extra-class listening laboratory time assigned. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: any MUS110-116 and MUS220; or POI.

MUS302 - History of Western Music: 1750 - Present (3 cr.)

Study of style, form, genre, compositional techniques, representative composers, and repertoire from the Classic and Romantic periods through the Modern era. Attention is given to the relation of music to the culture and social institution of each period. Extra-class listening laboratory time assigned. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: any of MUS110-116 and MUS220; or POI.

MUS305 - Introduction to Music Technology (3 cr.)

A theoretical and hands-on introduction to music technology. Principles of digital audio and MIDI programming will be presented in a music technology studio environment. Various hardware platforms and software applications will be explored and a number of projects assigned. (Spring). Prerequisites: MUS120 or POI.

MUS310 - Topics in Music (3 cr.)

Selected topics in music for research and in-depth classroom discussion, service learning and/or interdisciplinary thinking by students. Topics change with each offering and will focus on such topics as major periods and genres of music (including extensive listening and score study), aesthetics, music technology and its applications, writing about music, music and literature, and music and film, among others. Multiple writing assignments with revisions throughout the semester. (Fall). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisites: MUS220, and either MUS301 or MUS302, or POI.

MUS326 - Aural Skills III (1 cr.)

Introduction to the diatonic harmonic system, including seventh chords, composition in four voices and the study of smaller musical forms. Lecture with Aural Skills II taken concurrently. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Co-requisite: MUS330. Prerequisite: MUS226.

MUS330 - Music Theory III (3 cr.)

Completion of the study of the tonal system, including uses of chromatic harmony in phrase construction and larger forms. Analysis of sonata-allegro, rondo, and variation forms. Lecture with Aural Skills III taken concurrently. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Co-requisite: MUS326. Prerequisite: MUS230.

MUS331 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS131. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS332 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS131. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS335 - Lyric Scenes Workshop (3 cr.)

Emphasis on preparation of songs, ensembles and scenes from the lyric stage, with a focus on musical theater, opera and operetta repertoire. Exploration of basic acting principles from the perspective of the musical score and libretto. Application of scene study, score study, and vocal technique to inform the performer's musical/dramatic interpretation. Public performance of staged "workshop" scenes. May be repeated once for credit. (Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: previous choral or vocal coursework is recommended. Audition required. POI.

MUS341 - Applied String Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS141. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS342 - Applied String Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS141. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS351 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS151. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS352 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS151. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS361 - Applied Woodwind Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS161. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS362 - Applied Woodwind Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS161. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS371 - Applied Brass Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS171 course description. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS372 - Topics: Applied Brass Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS171. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS381 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS181. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS382 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS181. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS383 - Piano Class II (0 to 3 cr.)

Group instruction on the piano at the intermediate level, further development of music reading, music theory knowledge and performance techniques, study of important composers of piano music, including women composers. There will be one public performance at semester's end. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MUS283 or POI.

MUS391 - College Chorale (1 cr.)

Large mixed chorus dedicated to developing a high level of individual and group musicianship, individual and group performance expertise, and performance of repertoire of the highest calibre. Activities include development of singing and sight-reading skills, and discussion of composers and works performed. This course may be repeated up to eight times for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MUS392 - Sinfonia (1 cr.)

A string ensemble dedicated to the development of individual and group musicianship. Through individual practice outside of class, students achieve a degree of self-reliance which enables them to strengthen cooperative work skills in class rehearsals. Rehearsals will include discussion of rehearsal skills, practice methods, interpretation, and the style of the composer. This course may be repeated up to eight times for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: audition required.

MUS393 - College Symphonic Band (0 to 1 cr.)

The primary objective of this course is to prepare music for concert performance. In the process, students develop reading and ensemble skills, technical understanding of music, and gain insight into composers and their works. Open to all members of the campus community. No course prerequisites or audition required, but ability to read music and play a musical instrument is necessary. Maybe repeated up to eight times for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MUS394 - Jazz Ensemble (1 cr.)

The primary objective of this course is to prepare music for concert performance. In the process, students develop reading and ensemble skills, technical understanding of music, and gain insight into composers and their works. Open to all members of the campus community. Ability to read music and audition required. This course may be repeated for up to eight credits. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: audition/POI.

MUS395 - Choral Union (1 cr.)

Classes dedicated to developing a high level of individual and group musicianship, individual and group performance expertise, and performance of the highest caliber repertoire. Activities include development of reading and sight-reading abilities, and discussion of composers and works performed. May be repeated up to eight times for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

MUS396 - Applied Composition (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS191. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS397 - Cardinal Singers (1 cr.)

Select choral ensemble dedicated to developing a high level of individual and group musicianship, individual, and group performance expertise, and performance of repertoire of the highest caliber. Activities include development of reading and sight-reading abilities, and discussion of composers and works performed. Enrollment by audition only. May be repeated up to eight times for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: audition.

MUS398 - Chamber Ensembles (1 to 3 cr.)

Small ensembles for students with previous experience in woodwind, brass, string and percussion instruments or voice. The ensembles will rehearse and perform chamber repertoire for various combinations of woodwinds, brass, strings, piano, percussion or voice, as determined by the instructor. May be repeated up to eight times for credit. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MUS431 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS131. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS432 - Applied Voice (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS431. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS441 - Applied String Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS141. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS442 - Applied String Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS441. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS451 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS151. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS452 - Applied Percussion (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS451. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS461 - Applied Woodwind Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS161. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS462 - Applied Music: Woodwind Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS461. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS471 - Applied Brass Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS171. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS472 - Topics: Applied Music: Brass Instruments (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS471. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI.

MUS481 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS181. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS482 - Applied Piano (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS481. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI.

MUS485 - Senior Seminar (3 cr.)

Collaborative design, critique, and completion of individual capstone projects that document creative or scholarly work in or related to music. Group activities in music research, project design, presentation, and evaluation. Final projects must be approved by the teaching faculty. Projects may have a service-learning component. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Senior standing (or POI); music major, minor, or concentration.

MUS491 - Applied Composition (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS191. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS492 - Applied Composition (title varies) (1 to 2 cr.)

Refer to MUS191. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: POI.

MUS495 - Practicum: Music Production (1 to 3 cr.)

Participation in and presentation of a major musical or musical-theatre production. Opportunity to perform on stage, or as accompanying musicians, stage managers, etc. May be repeated for credit. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI.

MUS496 - Tutorial in Music Performance (1 to 2 cr.)

Assist in planning, preparation, class demonstration and teaching of performance courses offered in the Music Program. May be repeated only once for credit. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, permission of supervising instructor and chairperson, a minimum GPA of 2.85.

MUS499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

MUS599 - Music Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

NUR199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

NUR299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

NUR303 - Nursing Fundamentals (4 cr.)

This course explores concepts that are foundational to holistic nursing care of individuals and families. This includes components of ethical and professional practice, introduction to the nursing process, basic concepts of pharmacology, fundamental nursing skills, and beginning skills of health assessment. This course provides laboratory and clinical experiences. (Spring). Prerequisites: BIO203, BIO326 (or coreq), PSY311.

NUR304 - Health Assessment (3 cr.)

Assessment of clients across the lifespan through history taking and physical examination. This includes gathering data about general health, illness, symptoms, behaviors, pain and lifespan. Identify goals for client education related to specific risk factors and highlight lifespan, cultural, and environmental considerations. Documentation of data using a functional patterns framework to communicate information between and among health professionals involved in care of client. Application of nursing theory in assessment process. Liberal arts.(Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: RN to BS nursing student.

NUR313 - Foundations of Nursing (4 cr.)

This course explores concepts that are foundational to holistic nursing care of individuals and families. This includes components of ethical and professional practice, introduction to the nursing process, concepts of pharmacology, fundamental nursing skills, and beginning skills of health assessment. Infection control and environmental safety is emphasized as students provide nursing care in laboratory and clinical settings. (Fall). Prerequisites: PSY311, BIO202, must be a nursing major.

NUR314 - Health Assessment and the Nursing Process (4 cr.)

This course builds foundational skill and nursing knowledge needed for clinical nursing practice. Socialization to the role of the professional nurse in delivering care and as a member of the health care team continues in structured clinical and laboratory settings. Emphasis is on health assessment and data collection. The diversity of the patient experience is examined in application of the nursing process and ethical decision-making. Nursing knowledge is developed in areas of diagnostic testing, treatments, health promotion, and medication administration. (Fall). Corequisite: BIO327. Prerequisites: NUR313, BIO326.

NUR326 - Health Promotion and Social Justice (3 cr.)

Students explore self-perspectives on health and risk behaviors, gaining an understanding of their contribution to health. The experience of diverse individuals and family access to health is examined within a framework of social justice. Students engage in ethical decision making as they explore how the dimensions of environment, upstream thinking and health policy relate to health promotion. The underlying dynamics of health, such as self-efficacy, genomics and resilience are studied. Students explore the impact of cultural, social and ethnic diversity on health promotion. Evidence-based strategies to achieve healthy people in healthy communities is integrated. (Spring). Prerequisite: NUR313 or RN-to-BS Nursing student.

NUR327 - Application of Research in Nursing Practice (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes the importance of nurses being able to read, critique, and synthesize research for use in practice. Concepts and skills underlying the research process, analysis of nursing research literature, and application of research findings in contemporary nursing practice are explored. Approved AWR. (Fall). Prerequisites: MAT161, ENG101, LIB200.

NUR332 - Topics in Pathophysiology (2 cr.)

This course will provide students with an in-depth view of selected pathophysiologic processes related to common chronic diseases. The role these diseases play in morbidity and mortality, and their summative impact on the human organism will be discussed. The impact of genetic inheritance will be included where appropriate. (Fall). Prerequisites: junior standing in nursing major or POI.

NUR342 - Nursing Informatics (3 cr.)

In this course students will explore models and theories of nursing informatics in health care settings. The impact of computer technologies on nursing administration, education, practice and research are addressed in the context of nursing informatics. Students will explore data collection and management in relation to the nursing process. The efficiency of nursing care delivery in relation to computer technologies and nursing decision making in all roles and settings will be emphasized. (Fall). Prerequisite: junior level standing in nursing.

NUR344 - Pharmacology I (1 cr.)

Pharmacology and its relationship to the wellness-illness continuum. Concepts basic to an understanding of the effects of chemicals on human physiology (especially with maternal and pediatric clients) and on psycho-social-cultural-spiritual aspects of drug therapy. (Fall). Prerequisite: BIO101 or CHE271.

NUR347 - Pharmacotherapy and Nursing (3 cr.)

This course will facilitate the development of a strong foundation in nursing pharmacotherapy. The role of the nurse in drug administration and therapeutic pharmacology is examined. Emphasis is placed on the nursing process in medication therapy and nursing knowledge for client safety. Students will rely on a foundation in the health sciences, especially physiology, to be successful in this course. Major therapeutic drug classifications are examined through lecture, case studies and other activities. Students will gain familiarity with NCLEX-RN style evaluation of pharmacology knowledge. (Fall). Prerequisite: NUR314.

NUR350 - Theoretical Foundations of Nursing (3 cr.)

This course builds a theoretical foundation for role formation and professional advancement. Historical influences to current perspectives provide an opportunity to consider sociopolitical and economic factors that influence nursing from a local and global view. Awareness, knowledge, and skill in cultural competence allow better treatment of diverse populations. Career management and professional educational opportunities are explored. (Fall). Prerequisite: RN option.

NUR356 - Professional Concepts (2 cr.)

Concepts basic to the development and progression toward professional nursing. (Spring). Prerequisite: NUR303.

NUR360 - Care of the Childbearing Family (3 cr.)

Emphasizes provision of family-centered, self-care during pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum and early neonatal life. Responses to simple and complex stressors are discussed. Clinical application of the nursing process to childbearing families. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: NUR303, junior standing in nursing.

NUR360L - Care of the Childbearing Family Lab (0 cr.)

NUR361 - Care of the Pediatric Client (3 cr.)

Adaptation of care related to the pediatric client and family. Responses to simple and complex stressors. Concurrent alterations in physiology, use of pharmacological agents and related therapeutic modalities. Nursing interventions for health maintenance and health restoration. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: NUR303 and junior level standing in nursing.

NUR362 - Nursing Care of Adults I (6 cr.)

This course focuses on responses of adult clients to commonly occurring alterations in health. The emphasis is on clinical decision-making to provide safe and effective client-centered nursing care. The nursing role in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of human response to selected acute and chronic conditions is applied in clinical practice with individual clients. (Fall). Prerequisites: NUR313, NUR314, junior level standing in nursing.

NUR363 - Nursing Care of Adults II (6 cr.)

This course focuses on understanding patterns of altered health and function of adult clients, with an emphasis on the interaction of the situational environment and the individual. Evidence-based clinical decision-making is stressed as a basis for designing and delivering therapeutic interventions for complex health alterations. Students care for individuals, families and groups in acute and non-acute settings. Self-directed, comprehensive care is expected in practice and simulation environments. (Spring). Prerequisite: NUR362.

NUR370 - Maternal Child Nursing I (4 cr.)

This course builds on theoretical foundations of nursing care, communication skills, and principles of health promotion with a focus on commonly occurring maternal and pediatric variations. Students will utilize critical thinking as they provide care for maternal and pediatric patients in hospitals and community settings. (Fall). Prerequisite: NUR314, NUR362.

NUR375 - HIV/AIDS Global Perspective (3 cr.)

Expand student awareness of the impact of and global response to HIV/AIDS. Develop a culture of inclusiveness through productive discourse of communication, science, community and leadership in HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. Examine crucial policy issues as well as the human face of hope and vulnerability. Explore meaningful perspectives concerning personal and social aspects of HIV/AIDS. (Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

NUR380 - Global Field Study: Cultural Diversity in Health and Wellness (3 cr.)

This course is a field experience in a foreign country, which promotes an understanding of the beliefs, values, environment and lifeways of people during health, and illness, and the variety of meanings these terms carry for members of differing sociocultural populations. (Winter and/or Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

NUR399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

NUR425 - Public Health Nursing (4 cr.)

Public health nursing is the practice of promoting and protecting the health of populations using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences. The national core competencies of baccalaureate preparation in public health nursing serve as the framework for the course. Students examine trends in upstream thinking that influence the evolution of health systems within an ecological context. Health and the global burden of disease are examined. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of all junior-level courses.

NUR427 - Research in Nursing (3 cr.)

Theory, research and practice as framework for nursing practice. Concepts, skills of the research process. Evaluation of research literature. Application of research findings to practice. (Fall/Summer). Prerequisites: sophomore standing or POI.

NUR428 - Management and Leadership (4 cr.)

Examines the nurse as leader and manager in health care and as critical to the provision of quality care in a variety of health care settings. Emphasis is placed on systems theory, ethical decision-making, and communication skills essential to working effectively with groups and organizations. Students will learn the importance of nursing's influence in the development of health policy. Students develop college-level proficiency in oral discourse through discussion, debate, review, and reflection. The nurses' role in quality healthcare systems, injury prevention, and safety are highlighted throughout the course. Students work with nurse managers and nursing leaders to apply the principles of management and leadership in a practice setting. This course meets the requirements for oral expression. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of all junior level nursing courses, including NUR327; also NUR350 for RN students.

NUR435 - Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing (4 cr.)

Mental health concepts and selected theoretical frameworks are used to understand alterations and adaptations in psychological functioning. Students participate in psychiatric-mental health nursing in relation to mental health promotion, advocacy, disease prevention, resources and legal and ethical issues. This course provides clinical experiences in acute care and community settings. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: senior standing in nursing or POI.

NUR437 - Public Policy and Professional Nursing (3 cr.)

Synthesis of core knowledge and skills necessary for professional practice. Exploration of role formation, transition, and continued professional development. Emphasis on advocacy for patients, practice and profession through public policy development. Integration of skills for improved visibility and influence. Focus on career planning and professional advancement. (Spring). Prerequisites: NUR304, NUR350.

NUR448 - Pharmacology V (1 cr.)

Designed to meet the unique learning needs of RN-to-BS student. Pharmacology and its relationship to the wellness-illness continuum designed for the advanced learner. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: RN status.

NUR464 - Nursing Care of Adults III (5 cr.)

This course focuses on complex alterations in health function. Intensive, trauma, and emergency nursing care is addressed, with focus on health restoration. Multi-trauma disaster planning is examined, with emphasis on the role of the nurse in acute care triage. Incorporation of high tech and intensive nursing care and the nurses' role in complex pharmacotherapy is emphasized throughout the course. (Spring/Fall). Prerequisite: NUR363.

NUR465 - Professional Role Transition (4 cr.)

Synthesis of core knowledge and skills necessary for professional practice. Exploration of role formation, transition, and continued professional development. Emphasis on future of professional nursing. Integration of skills for improved visibility and influence in complex systems. Practicum experience to enhance leadership and collaborative skills in working with members of the interprofessional health care team. Self-directed problem-based learning approach to career planning and professional advancement. (Spring). Prerequisites: NUR350, NUR304.

NUR466 - Transition to Professional Nursing Practice (5 cr.)

Synthesis of core knowledge and skills in preparation for entry level professional practice. Review of the professional body of knowledge necessary for entry into practice and licensure. Exploration of role formation, transition, and continued professional development. Emphasis on advocacy for patients, practice and profession. Focus on career planning and professional advancement. Practicum experience enables students to demonstrate leadership and collaborative skills in working with other members of the health care team. Credits: 5 (3 lecture, 2 clinical). (Spring). Prerequisites: senior standing in nursing; completion of fall semester senior nursing courses and general education requirements.

NUR473 - Maternal Child Nursing II (3 cr.)

This course builds on Maternal Child Nursing I, with emphasis on therapeutic management of maternal and pediatric patients experiencing complex and high-risk alterations in health status. Genetic, environmental, psychosocial, physiological and developmental influences in caring for children experiencing complex alterations in health are considered. Content related to domestic violence and childhood abuse and neglect is also addressed. Meets requirement for professional nurse licensure on reporting child abuse and neglect. (Fall). Prerequisite: NUR370.

NUR496 - Nursing Practicum (1 to 6 cr.)

(Fall - Spring).

NUR499 - Independent Study in Nursing (1 to 4 cr.)

Individualized theoretical/clinical independent study in an area of interest with the guidance of a selected faculty member. Approval of the proposal by the advisor, the faculty sponsor and the department chairperson. Prerequisites: junior standing in nursing

NUR501 - Theoretical Foundations of Nursing Science (3 cr.)

This course explores and analyzes the historical and philosophical basis of nursing science. Knowledge development is examined as the foundation for the discipline and quality care. Nursing theory and other theories are evaluated for their usefulness and applicability to advanced nursing practice and evidence-based innovation. (Fall).

NUR510 - Advanced Pathophysiology (3 cr.)

This course examines and presents advanced physiologic and pathophysiologic concepts and conditions essential for critical thinking and clinical decision-making by the nurse in an advanced practice role. Liberal arts. (Fall).

NUR511 - Advanced Health Assessment (3 cr.)

Prepares the advanced practice nurse to conduct diagnostic health assessment, including history taking, differential diagnoses and recommendations for intervention. Physical and psychological signs, developmental stages, as well as cultural and psychosocial characteristics are emphasized. The concepts of clinical reasoning and decision-making for assessment and management of patients are emphasized. Course requires practical demonstration of assessment techniques. (Fall).

NUR512 - Advanced Pharmacotherapeutics (3 cr.)

In-depth study of pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics therapy including clinical applications of the major classifications of drugs. Domains of advanced practice are emphasized, including prescription writing, patient education and legal/ethical responsibilities. (Fall).

NUR520 - Health Promotion and Professional Collaboration (3 cr.)

Students in this course will explore advanced concepts of health promotion including the role of culture and poverty as determinants of health. Local, national and global trends that strengthen or challenge the health of society will be incorporated into assessments of health. Principles and theories of health behavior and health promotion, and collaborative efforts of practitioners of family health, sociology, epidemiology and genomics will be applied to selected clinical populations. Students will learn advanced strategies to enhance the health of patients across the adult lifespan. Emphasis will be on application of collaborative strategies in population health concepts and theory, health literacy, health communication, genomics and epidemiology. (Spring).

NUR521 - Informatics, Quality, and Safety (3 cr.)

The focus of this course is on the role of the advanced practice nurse in implementation of point of care, communication, decision-support, and other technologies to deliver, coordinate, and promote safe and quality care. Emphasis is on systematic access to and synthesis of research and health evidence as a basis for advanced nursing practice and transformation of clinical systems. Use of statistical and epidemiological data to analyze patient outcomes and direct clinical innovation is discussed. (Spring).

NUR530 - Adult/Gerontological Care Management I (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the development of clinical reasoning skills to address common health care problems of adults across the lifespan. Emphasis is placed on developing differential problem solving skills and determining holistic management interventions. The management of common acute and chronic health conditions will include evidence-based primary prevention, drug and treatment therapeutics and referral to other health care providers. Students will build on previously acquired knowledge and skills to apply concepts of primary care to management of common health problems of adults. (Spring). Prerequisite: NUR510.

NUR550 - Clinical Residency and Seminar I (3 cr.)

Initial clinical residency course focusing on integration of physiological knowledge, assessment skills, and understanding of clinical manifestations in the management of common acute and chronic disorders. Students interpret assessment data and results of diagnostic testing in the development of clinical decision-making skills. Students collaborate with the healthcare team to implement and evaluate therapeutic interventions for adults, integrating evidence as a basis for practice. Reflection on outcomes of practice occurs through seminar meetings. Requires 100 hours of clinical practice. (Spring). Corequisite: NUR530. Prerequisites: NUR501, NUR510, NUR511, NUR512.

OAP300 - Overseas Academic Program (3 to 12 cr.)

Liberal arts.

PED102 - Strength and Cardiovascular Conditioning (1 cr.)

Application of fitness and wellness principles to develop muscular endurance, strength, power and cardiovascular endurance. Emphasis on the development of a personal lifetime fitness program. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. Must be Fitness Center member to enroll. (Spring, Fall).

PED129 - Martial Arts (1 cr.)

Introduction to a variety of traditional and modern martial arts forms and skills. Different forms of martial arts will include Basic Shaolin Kempo Karati, Joi-Jitsu and Shalolin Kung-fu. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Spring, Fall).

PED134 - Ice Skating (1 cr.)

Course emphasizes development of basic ice skating skills. Class discusses selection of proper equipment and safety. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. Skates available for rental. (Spring, Fall).

PED138 - Beginning/Intermediate Swimming (1 cr.)

Designed for the non-swimmer or novice swimmer to improve their swimming skills and aquatic fitness conditioning. Emphasis on skill development and personal safety practices to be safe in or around the water. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Spring, Fall).

PED142 - Beginning Tennis (1 cr.)

Introduction to beginning tennis. Course emphasizes skill development and knowledge for beginners in tennis. Class discusses equipment, etiquette and basic terms and rules. Course maybe offered on P/F based on participation or letter grade based on skill improvement and knowledge depending on instructor. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree (Fall).

PED175 - Sea Kayaking I (1 cr.)

Introduction to recreational sea kayak touring. Class includes discussion of the history of kayaks with attention to the evolution of kayak and paddle design. Skill development includes a variety of paddle strokes, wet exits, and self rescues. In addition to skill clinics, course includes a variety of tours. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Summer).

PED176 - Sea Kayaking II (1 cr.)

Course focuses on refining and advancing sea kayaking skills, with special attention to advanced dimensions of the forward stroke, variant rescue skills, use of the lower body for control, and rolling. In addition to skill development, course includes tours requiring more sustained paddling. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Summer). Prerequisite or Corequisite: PED175.

PED191 - Advanced Activity (1 cr.)

Participation and completing a season on a SUNY Plattsburgh intercollegiate athletic team. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Spring, Fall).

PED192 - Advanced Activity (1 cr.)

Participation and completing a season on a SUNY Plattsburgh intercollegiate athletic team. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Spring, Fall).

PED193 - Advanced Activity (1 cr.)

Participation and completing a season on a SUNY Plattsburgh intercollegiate athletic team. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Spring, Fall).

PED194 - Advanced Activity (1 cr.)

Participation and completing a season on a SUNY Plattsburgh intercollegiate athletic team. Course offered as P/F and based on participation. Students may apply a maximum of four credit hours of physical education activity courses (PED 100-194) toward their degree. (Spring, Fall).

PED201 - CPR/AED/First Aid (0 to 1 cr.)

Provides the student with knowledge and skill to handle first aid emergencies and basic first aid. American Red Cross certification will be issued at the completion of course for individuals meeting Red Cross standards. (Spring, Fall).

PED203 - Waterfront Lifeguarding (3 cr.)

Skill and knowledge necessary to keep patrons of pool and waterfront aquatic facilities safe in and around the water and respond to emergencies in pools and waterfronts. Successful completion of all components of the course will certify the student in American Red Cross Lifeguarding/Waterfront/First Aid and CPR/AED for the Professional Rescuer. (Spring). Prerequisite: American Red Cross preliminary swimming test.

PED204 - CHAMPS/Life Skills (3 cr.)

The CHAMPS/Life Skills Program was created to support the student-athlete development initiatives of NCAA member institutions and to enhance the quality of the student-athlete experience within the context of higher education (NCAA.org). Prepares student-athletes to develop skills for academic success and an appreciation for their responsibilities as citizens in the global community, and to demonstrate, in written assignments and oral presentations, critical understanding of academic issues as they relate to the student-athlete. (Fall).

PED210 - Introduction to Fitness & Wellness Leadership Major (2 cr.)

Introduces students to careers and trends in the fitness industry, the academic program and requirements, academic planning, certification organizations, and fitness and wellness concepts and assists students with the development of life skills in the areas of academics, personal development, leadership, career development and commitment to service. (Fall). Prerequisite: Fitness and Wellness Leadership major.

PED212 - Introduction to Personal Fitness Training (2 cr.)

Provide a foundational understanding of the exercise sciences, personal training profession, and fitness industry along with receiving practical experiences in the areas of health assessments, exercise movements, and fitness management. (Spring). Prerequisites: PED210 and must be a Fitness and Wellness Leadership major.

PED214 - Advanced Personal Fitness Training (2 cr.)

Students will learn advanced concepts required of the personal fitness trainer that include the knowledge, skills, and abilities (KSAs) used to improve, maintain, and/or optimize health-related components of physical fitness, functional movements, and sports performance. The student will assist the course instructor and upper-class students. In addition, the course will prepare students to take the ACSM's Certified Personal Trainer certification exam. (Fall). Prerequisites: PED212 and must be a Fitness and Wellness Leadership major.

PED220 - Theory and Technique of Coaching Basketball (2 cr.)

The organization and administration of coaching a basketball program. Emphasis given to team strategy, offensive and defensive theories, coaching philosophies and overall development of a high school and college program. (Fall).

PED222 - Theory and Technique of Coaching Baseball and Softball (2 cr.)

Development of philosophy and skills to coach either a baseball or softball program. Emphasis on development of individual and team fundamentals, team strategies, offensive and defensive skills and the overall administration of a youth, high school or college program. (Fall).

PED224 - Theory and Techniques of Coaching Ice Hockey (2 cr.)

Development of philosophy and skills to coach an ice hockey program. Emphasis to development of individual and team fundamentals, team strategies, offensive and defensive skills and the overall development of a high school and college program. (Spring).

PED225 - Theory and Technique of Coaching Track and Field (2 cr.)

Development of philosophy and skills to coach a track and field program. Emphasis will be given on training theory, coaching distance/middle distance, sprints/relays, hurdles, jumps and throws and the overall development of a high school and college program. (Fall).

PED227 - Theory and Technique of Coaching Soccer (2 cr.)

Development of philosophy and skills to coach a soccer program. Emphasis given to the development of individual and team fundamentals, team strategies, offensive and defensive skills and the overall development of a high school and college program. (Fall).

PED271 - Wellness and Fitness in Contemporary Society (3 cr.)

Examines how current lifestyle in society influences an individual's wellness decisions and how an individual's wellness decisions affect changes in society. Basic knowledge of fitness, exercise, nutrition, disease, injury and their relationship to overall wellness. An overview of training and conditioning methods and general exercise program design. Individual considerations for positive health and wellness. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

PED301 - PE Teaching Assistants (1 cr.)

Experience as a teaching assistant in appropriate Physical Education courses. Students may serve as TA only four times for credit. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisites: by permission of chairperson.

PED302 - PE Teaching Assistants (1 cr.)

Refer to PED301 course description. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisites: by permission of chairperson

PED303 - PE Teaching Assistants (1 cr.)

Refer to PED301 course description. (Fall). Prerequisites: by permission of chairperson.

PED304 - PE Teaching Assistants (1 cr.)

Refer to PED301 course description. Prerequisites: by permission of chairperson.

PED311 - Coaching Psychology (1 cr.)

Examines the psychological relationship between the coach and the individual athlete and between the coach and the team. Investigates personal coaching styles and how communication skills and mental skill training can be incorporated into coaching philosophy. Also examines how coaches deal with personal and team stress. (Fall). Liberal arts.

PED333 - The Science of Exercise (3 cr.)

The study of various factors that affect human performance including regulatory mechanisms, responses, adaptations and changes that occur as a result of physical activity. Topics include physiology demands of exercise, energy systems, effects on human development, and implications for personal fitness and fitness professionals. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

PED334 - Kinesiology (3 cr.)

The study of human movement in relationship to the physical sciences. Designed to analyze human motion based on anatomical and mechanical principles. Topics include joint and segmental movements, muscle action in regards to everyday and fitness activity, and implications for personal fitness and for fitness professionals. Basic biomechanical and neuromuscular physiology will be applied along with the musculoskeletal anatomy. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO326 and BIO327.

PED335 - Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (3 cr.)

Understanding attitudes, practices and practical skills, which contribute to a better understanding of the prevention and care of athletic injuries. (Fall).

PED336 - Fitness Programming (3 cr.)

Examines the knowledge necessary to design and implement proper exercise programs for diverse populations and fitness levels and provide the appropriate environment to facilitate successful program implementation. Information in this course will assist in preparing students for Personal Trainer and/or Strength and Conditioning certification. Students may not receive credit for both PED323 and PED336 (Spring, Summer, Fall).

PED337 - Group Exercise Programming (3 cr.)

Prepares students for instruction of, planning for and managing group exercise programming. Students will learn the dynamics of various group exercise classes. The course will focus on physiological benefits, methodology, class design, music progressions and effective choreography flow and transition. Students will identify and prepare for a variety of accredited certifications. (Spring).

PED338 - Supplemental and Ergogenic Aids (2 cr.)

A study of research, research findings, and issues in the physiology and psychological effects of ergogenics on human performance in sport and exercise. Topics include doping, drug testing, clinical and scientific research on use and abuse of performance-enhancing substances, legal issues and application for personal fitness and fitness professionals. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

PED350 - Coaching Internship (1 cr.)

This is the capstone course for students enrolled in the Coaching Minor. It requires arranging a supervised participation as a student coach with a high school athletic program or competitive athletic program. May be taken twice. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: must be registered in coaching minor and have completed all core courses. Permission of chairperson required.

PED399 - Independent Study (1 to 12 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall ).

PED401 - Fitness Field Experience I (2 cr.)

Supervised field experience for Fitness and Wellness Leadership majors; 120 hours on site. Three seminar classes will be scheduled for field experience participants. Students will be placed in a professional role and fitness site that serves clientele in profit, non-profit, college, high school, clinical, or other setting. (Fall & Spring). Prerequisites: PED214, American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Certified Personal Trainer Certification, Permission of Program Coordinator, and Junior standing in major.

PED402 - Fitness Field Experience II (2 cr.)

Supervised field experience for Fitness and Wellness Leadership majors; 120 hours on site. Three seminar classes will be scheduled for field experience participants. Students will be placed in a professional role and fitness site that serves clientele in profit, non-profit, college, high school, clinical, or other setting. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: ACSM-CPT Certification and junior standing in major.

PED403 - Fitness Field Experience III (2 cr.)

Supervised field experience for Fitness and Wellness Leadership majors; 120 hours on site. Three seminar classes will be scheduled for field experience participants. Students will be placed in a professional role and fitness site that serves clientele in profit, non-profit, college, high school, clinical, or other setting. (Fall). Prerequisites: ACSM-CPT Certification and junior standing in major.

PED404 - Fitness Field Experience IV (2 cr.)

Supervised field experience for Fitness and Wellness Leadership majors; 120 hours on site. Three seminar classes will be scheduled for field experience participants. Students will be placed in a professional role and fitness site that serves clientele in profit, non-profit, college, high school, clinical, or other setting. (Spring). Prerequisites: ASCM-CPT Certification and junior standing.

PED405 - Health-Fitness-Medical Field Internship (3 cr.)

Supervised field internship experience for Fitness and Wellness Leadership majors only. Student will be placed in a professional role at a health-fitness-medical site that serves clientele in profit, non-profit, college, high school, clinical, or other setting. Students may take this course for credit more than once. (Summer). Prerequisites: permission of program coordinator, sophomore standing or above in the Fitness and Wellness Leadership major.

PED410 - Fitness Management (3 cr.)

Fitness and Wellness Leadership capstone course that examines the fitness industry and management practices and operational issues in commercial, corporate, clinical and community settings. Topics include managing and operating facilities for front-of-the-house (member and guest services) and back-of-the-house (facility and equipment maintenance, business office and financial management, legal issues and insurance matters) and the planning and evaluation processes. (Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing in major.

PED420 - Philosophy, Principles & Organization of Athletics in Education (3 cr.)

Philosophy and principles of athletics as an integral part of physical education. Topics include functions, rules and organization of NYS Public High School Athletic Association, risk management, standards for coaches, and coach's responsibilities as an educator of youth. (Spring).

PED499 - Independent Study (1 to 12 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

PHI102 - Introduction to Philosophy (3 cr.)

Nature and problems of philosophy, logic and language. Problems of knowledge. Metaphysics or speculative philosophy. Problems of value. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

PHI104 - Moral Problems (3 cr.)

Introduction to moral problems in contemporary society. Examines applied ethical issues that arise in the context of current events, literature or film. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts.

PHI112 - Introduction to Logic (3 cr.)

Systematic development of logical reasoning, critical thinking, and other widely applicable analytic skills. Involves practice in analyzing reasoning patterns. Promotes increased logical coherence in thinking and writing. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts.

PHI125 - Science and the Supernatural (3 cr.)

A course devoted to the philosophical issue of distinguishing science from pseudoscience. Popular beliefs in astrology, scientific creationism, parapsychology and other purportedly supernatural phenomena will be methodologically and historically examined and contrasted with scientific explanations. (Fall/Spring).Liberal arts.

PHI199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

PHI210 - History of Western Philosophy to 1500 (3 cr.)

History of Western Philosophy from the pre-Socrates to Nicholas of Cusa. Pre-Socratics, Aristotle, Stoics, Epicureans, Plotinus, St. Thomas, Scotus, Ockham. Relation of medieval sciences to philosophy. Relevance of late medieval period. (Fall). Liberal arts.

PHI211 - History of Western Philosophy from the 1500s (3 cr.)

Impact of the scientific revolution and reformation of philosophy, discussion on the works of Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Hume, Kant, Mill, Hegel and Marx. (Spring). Liberal arts.

PHI213 - Symbolic Logic (3 cr.)

Introduction to the language, methods, and content of deductive logic. Topics include truth-tables, syllogisms, syntax and semantics of sentential logic and predicate logic systems, and proofs of validity in sentential logic and predicate logic. (Fall). Liberal arts.

PHI230 - Social and Political Philosophy (3 cr.)

Analysis and evaluation of central ideas in social and political philosophy, such as the individual's relation to the state, the foundation of human rights, social responsibilities, and the scope of legitimate freedom. (Fall). Liberal arts.

PHI240 - Asian Philosophy (3 cr.)

Survey of Middle- and Far-East philosophies and their views and systems with special emphasis on Hindu, Buddhist and Islamic Philosophies. (Fall). Liberal arts.

PHI270 - Philosophy of Mind, Brain and Consciousness (3 cr.)

Survey of major historical and contemporary philosophical positions about the nature of mind. Topics include the mind-body problem, the problem of consciousness, the problem of other minds, identity theories of mind, materialism, functionalism, artificial intelligence, and cognitive ethology. Material drawn from the neural and cognitive sciences as well as philosophy. (Spring). Liberal arts.

PHI299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

PHI302 - Contemporary European Philosophy (3 cr.)

Critical survey of movements and figures in European philosophy since 1900, and their influence on philosophy outside of Europe. Movements to be studied include: phenomenology, hermeneutics, critical theory, poststructuralism, and postmodernism. (Once Every Two Years) (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite (recommended): three PHI credits or sophomore standing.

PHI303 - Chinese Philosophy (Spring) (3 cr.)

Critical survey of the major philosophical schools of China's classical period, including Confucianism, Daoism, Mohism, and Legalism. May also include later developments such as Neo-Confucianism and/or Chinese Buddhism as well as issues of contemporary relevance such as Confucian critiques of human rights. (every three years). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 3 credits in philosophy, or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI311 - Existentialism (3 cr.)

Origins and principles of existential thought. Analysis of concepts, such as alienation, inauthenticity, absurdity, dread. Representative readings in Heidegger, Sartre, Camus, Marcel. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 PHI credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI312 - Ethical Theory (3 cr.)

Study of major Western figures, such as Aristotle, Kant, and Mill, and their theoretical approaches to ethics. Topics may include moral psychology, free will and moral responsibility, professional duties and obligations. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three philosophy credits or sophomore standing recommended.

PHI313 - Metaphysics (3 cr.)

Study of being, reality, substance, relation. The ways in which philosophers organize and systematize knowledge of reality. Inquiry into relation of systems to reality. The development of metaphysics. Critique. Metaphysics and religion and science. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI314 - Aesthetics (3 cr.)

Philosophical approaches to art and beauty. Problems concerning interpretation and evaluation of works of art; aesthetic attitudes and experiences; imagination and representation; and, definitions of art. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI316 - American Philosophy (3 cr.)

A critical survey of movements and figures in American philosophy from the Colonial Period to the present. Emphasis on transcendentalism, pragmatism and neo-pragmatism. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: three philosophy credits, sophomore standing or POI.

PHI317 - Contemporary Philosophy (3 cr.)

Survey of criticism of representative 20th century schools of philosophy: Catholic humanism, American realism, pragmatism, phenomenology, logical positivism, dialectical materialism, existentialism, language analysis and naturalism. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI320 - Philosophy of Religion (3 cr.)

Philosophical thinking about religion. Concepts and propositions of theology. Reasoning of theologians and philosophers. Religious experience and the activity of worship. Oriental as compared to Western religion. Religion and science. (Fall ). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI324 - Theory of Knowledge (3 cr.)

Basic concepts concerning human knowledge, truth, perception, memory, certainty, meaning and verification. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI325 - Philosophy of Science (3 cr.)

Analysis of such key scientific concepts as explanation, prediction, law and theory, theoretical constructs, space and time, operationalism, validation of theories. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI328 - Nietzsche (3 cr.)

Comprehensive examination of the work of Nietzsche, including his concepts of self-overcoming, the eternal recurrence, the overman, Nietzsche's attack on Christianity and his place and influence upon such contemporary movements as existentialism and positivism. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI329 - Philosophy of Religion, Process Philosophy and Science (3 cr.)

Relation of process philosophy to religion and the data of science. Philosophic and scientific methodology, objectivity, God: changing or unchanging?, becoming and perfection, evil, omnipotence, time. These topics will be considered in regard to the challenge of process philosophy and science to the traditional philosophy of religion. The positions of Charles Hartshorne, Thomas Kuhn and Teilhard de Chardin will be considered. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 3 philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI347 - Phenomenology (3 cr.)

Phenomenological method; the phenomenological movement in European and American philosophy. Doctrines of Husserl and such later practitioners as Heidegger, Sartre, Ingarden, Merleau-Ponty, Minkowsky, Nabert. Contributions of phenomenology to psychiatry, arts, science and literature. (Fall). Liberal arts.

PHI350 - Environmental Ethics (3 cr.)

Exploration and evaluation of the relations between humans and their natural environment. To what extent and in what circumstances are we morally responsible for the natural environment? To whom or what are we responsible? How are these responsibilities justified? Topics may include animal rights, feminist and non-Western perspectives, science and values, wilderness preservation. When appropriate, issues of local concern will be emphasized. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI360 - Topics in Philosophy (3 cr.)

Specialized study of a particular topic in philosophy. Topics will vary with instructor and semester but may include: The Emotions, Ethics and Animals, Nature, Culture and the Hunt. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI361 - Nature, Culture, and the Hunt (3 cr.)

Examination of ethical and conceptual issues related to hunting. Topics include: animal welfare critiques, hunting codes and their ethical significance, conservationism and hunting, hunting and the local food movement, hunter behavior, sport, commercial, and subsistence hunting, game animals. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, and PHI102 or PHI104 or three credits of PHI, or POI.

PHI362 - Ethics and Animals (3 cr.)

Survey and analysis of ethical issues about animals. Topics may include: animal rights, hunting, vegetarianism, animal reason and emotion, and political activism on behalf of animals. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, and PHI102 or PHI104 or three credits in PHI, or POI.

PHI363 - Moral Responsibility (3 cr.)

Philosophical analysis of the conditions for ascribing moral responsibility. Topics may include: free will and moral responsibility, moral praise and blame applied to children, animals, the mentally ill, or to collective organizations such as corporations. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, and PHI102 or PHI104 or three credits in PHI, or POI.

PHI364 - Outdoor Ethics (3 cr.)

Exploration of the ways in which outdoor recreational activities lead to the development of environmental ethics. Topics may include: the concept of leisure activities, the commercialization of outdoor recreation, and the effects of competition on the ethical status of outdoor practices. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and PHI102 or PHI104 or three credits in PHI or POI.

PHI365 - Food Justice (3 cr.)

Study of the ethical issues that emerge from how food is grown, produced, transported, and distributed. Topics may include farmworker rights, food insecurity, food sovereignty, sustainable agriculture, and activism on behalf of food justice. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: three philosophy credits or sophomore standing or POI.

PHI395 - Ethics in Action Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Internship or Practicum. Examination of the ethical dimensions of community service or professional activities through practice, reflection, discussion, and writing. Students must fulfill at least 45 hours of community service or practicum activity in the same semester in which they are enrolled in PHI395. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: sophomore standing or POI.

PHI399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

PHI411 - Philosophy of the Middle Ages (3 cr.)

Medieval and scholastic thought against Platonic and Aristotelian background. Plotinus, St. Augustine, St. Anselm, St. Bonaventure, St. Thomas, Grosseteste, Scotus, Ockham. Significance of Alexander Hales and Peter Lombard, Nicholas of Autrecourt, Nicholas of Cusa. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts.

PHI417 - Semantics (3 cr.)

Philosophical problems that arise in any discussion of the relation between words and things. Problems of prediction of non-existents and restrictions on the substitutivity principle. Readings from Frege, Russell and Quine. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: six philosophy credits or POI.

PHI419 - Topics in Philosophical Ethics (3 cr.)

Examines issues in the recent literature of philosophical ethics. Topics vary but may include some of the following: metaethics, moral epistemology, friendship and moral theory, feminist ethics, biology and ethics, moral responsibility. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PHI230 or PHI312 or POI.

PHI444 - Philosophy and Culture (3 cr.)

Study of selected movements in contemporary Western philosophy, such as hermeneutics, poststructuralism, postmodernism, critical theory, and pragmatism, as analyses and critiques of culture. Emphasis on concepts of race, gender, sexuality, and class as they intersect with questions of identity, cultural practices and productions. (Spring). Approved AWR. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101, six philosophy credits or POI.

PHI490 - Advanced Writing in Philosophy (4 cr.)

Special topics on major figures, problems, or movements. Provides extensive writing practice in various modes of written expression, such as expository essays, position papers, discussion papers, critical essays, or reading journals. Students must complete a major project emphasizing the critical processes of writing, including drafting, editing, and revising. Open only to junior and senior philosophy majors. Approved AWR. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101, junior or senior philosophy major.

PHI496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Students will assist in the instruction of a course under the supervision of a faculty member. A signed contract specifying activities will be filed in the department. May be repeated once for up to six credits. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts credit. Prerequisites: by invitation only, GPA 3.0.

PHI499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

PHI580 - Advanced Topics in Philosophy (Upon Demand) (3 cr.)

Advanced study of special topics on major figures, problems or movements in philosophy. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. Students cannot receive credit for the same topic at the undergraduate and graduate level. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

PHY101 - Introduction to Physics (4 cr.)

An introduction to the basic concepts and applications of classical and modern physics. Designed primarily as a one-semester terminal course for students majoring in areas other than physics and chemistry. Lecture/laboratory. (Includes a three-hour laboratory each week). (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: a working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry.

PHY101L - Introduction to Physics Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

PHY103 - Physics for the Life Sciences I (4 cr.)

Introduction to the basic concepts and applications of physics, including mechanics, fluids, and electricity. Algebra-based presentation of subject matter emphasizes biological examples. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: MATA competency or MAT101.

PHY104 - Physics for the Life Sciences II (4 cr.)

Introduction to the basic concepts and applications of physics, including magnetism, thermodynamics, wave physics, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Algebra-based presentation of subject matter emphasizes biological examples. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PHY103 and MATA competency or MAT101.

PHY104L - Physics for the Life Sciences II Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring)

PHY111 - General Physics I (0 or 4 cr.)

The course provides a basic but unified and quantitative introduction to the experimental laws and fundamental principles of physics. The course content includes mechanics, thermal physics, wave motion, optics and electromagnetism. However, the principles of special relativity and the quantum nature of matter and radiation will be integrated into relevant portions of those topics. Lecture/laboratory. (Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Corequisite: MAT224. Prerequisite: working knowledge of algebra and trigonometry.

PHY111L - General Physics I Lab (0 cr.)

(Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

PHY112 - General Physics II (4 cr.)

A lecture, laboratory course designed for all science majors. It provides an introduction to the topics of classical physics. Content of the course includes such topics as: mechanics, thermal physics, wavemotion, electricity and magnetism and optics, as well as the development and use of vectors and vector algebra. (Spring, Summer). Liberal arts. Co-requisites: MAT225. Prerequisites: MAT224, PHY111.

PHY112L - General Physics II Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring, Summer). Liberal arts.

PHY199 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

PHY299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

PHY310 - Statics (3 cr.)

Applications of free-body techniques to the solution of practical engineering problems involving material bodies in a static equilibrium. Designed primarily as a one-semester course for students majoring in a physics-engineering program. Lecture only. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT225, PHY111.

PHY311 - Analytical Mechanics (3 cr.)

Analytic study of motion of particles and systems of particles leading up to formalisms of Lagrange and Hamilton. Topics include motion in a central field, the linear oscillator, the dynamics of rigid bodies, generalized coordinates. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT326, PHY111.

PHY312 - Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics (3 cr.)

Newtonian formalism applied to engineering problems involving both particle dynamics and rigid body motion. Designed for students majoring in the engineering and physics programs. Lecture only. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT225, PHY111.

PHY314 - Introduction to Modern Physics (3 cr.)

Fundamentals of modern physics at an elementary level. A complement to classical principles developed in General Physics. Both the kinematics and dynamics of special relativity are studied, after which quantum concepts are introduced and successively applied to atomic, molecular, solid, and nuclear systems, and to the elementary particles. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT225, PHY112.

PHY317 - Fluid Dynamics (3 cr.)

Laws of mechanics and thermodynamics applied to fluids at rest and in motion; potential flow; dimensional analysis; viscous flow; pipe flow; boundary-layer theory; compressible flow. (Fall). Liberal arts. Co-requisite: MAT326. Prerequisites: PHY112 and MAT225.

PHY320 - Strength of Materials (3 cr.)

The study at the elementary level of the mechanics of solid deformable bodies. Designed for students in the engineering and physics programs. Lecture only. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PHY310

PHY341 - Thermodynamics (3 cr.)

The first and second laws of thermodynamics and their applications to special systems. Introduction to the kinetic theory of gases and statistical mechanics. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT326, PHY112.

PHY350 - Circuits and Electronics (without lab) (3 cr.)

An introduction to the fundamentals of electrical and electronic circuit theory using an integrated approach. Both circuit analysis and synthesis methods are presented. The theoretical development utilizes the concept of terminal characteristics rather than the physics of electronic devices. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT225, PHY112.

PHY365 - Electronics for Scientists (4 cr.)

Theory and application of electronic devices and systems. The detailed operation of basic devices and circuits will be introduced, followed by the design and behavior of more complex analog and digital systems including those used in instruments and computers. Lecture and laboratory. (Fall, Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PHY112.

PHY365L - Electronics for Scientists Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring, Fall).

PHY379 - Introduction to Robotics (4 cr.)

An overview and introduction of robotics in practice and research with topics including vision, motion planning, mobile mechanisms, kinematics, inverse kinematics, and sensors. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: PHY111, MAT225 or MAT202, co- or prerequisite CSC221.

PHY380 - Intermediate Laboratory (3 cr.)

A one-semester laboratory course. Detailed experiments will be performed in various areas of physics with the emphasis on experiments in modern physics. Two hours of lecture/consultation, two-three hours experimentation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PHY112.

PHY398 - Technical Reports in Physics and Engineering (3 cr.)

Methods of effective written communication of technical information for different audiences and purposes; includes essay for non-technical audience, textbook chapter, grant proposal, technical report, letter of application, resume and production and presentation of Power Point report. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and PHY380.

PHY399 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

PHY421 - Fundamentals of Electromagnetism (3 cr.)

The fundamentals of electricity and magnetism. The course covers static, electric, and magnetic fields in free space and material media, Maxwell's equations and the propagation of plane electromagnetic waves. It also addresses transmission lines, waveguides, radiation and antennas, and contemporary topics in this field. (Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PHY112 and MAT426.

PHY431 - Physical Optics (4 cr.)

The vectorial nature of light, coherence and interference, diffraction, and the optics of solids. The quantum aspect of light is treated by considering the emission of light by atoms, molecules and solid bodies and optical amplification as employed in lasers. Lecture and laboratory. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT326, PHY314.

PHY431L - Physical Optics Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring, Fall).

PHY452 - Quantum Mechanics (3 cr.)

The basic postulates of quantum theory with application to simple systems. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: MAT426, PHY314.

PHY495 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Participation in research programs in physics, education in physics, or fields related to physics under the guidance of advisors. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing.

PHY496 - Practicum (1 to 12 cr.)

(Fall - Spring).

PHY499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer, Fall).

PRE240 - Audio-Video Production for Journalism and Public Relations (3 cr.)

This hands-on course is designed to familiarize the student with the basic theory and practice of audio and video production in journalism and public relations. This course will introduce the student to the basics of capturing and editing audio and video for the Web, including writing for audio and video, operation of audio recorders and video camcorders, and digital editing of audio and video. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: JOU206. Restricted to journalism and public relations majors, or journalism minors; unless student has chair's approval.

PRE305 - Unlocking Hidden Stories in the Local Community: Historical Research for PR and Journalism (3 cr.)

Introduces students in Journalism and Public Relations to historical research with primary sources. The types of historical resources investigated in this course include government and archival records commonly available in most communities. Students will learn how to use these sources to recreate historically the lives of individuals and communities. Liberal arts. (Every Other Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101.

PRE311 - Public Relations Principles (3 cr.)

A review of public relations practices -- including issue and crisis management, lobbying, image campaigns, and internal corporate communication -- that enable organizations to develop and manage socially responsible relationships with their various stakeholders. Emphasis on the role of public opinion in strategic organizational communication. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM101; ENG101; CMM118.

PRE314 - Public Relations Management (3 cr.)

This course focuses on public relations planning and management and will provide students with the understanding to successfully implement all the steps of a full-scale public relations campaign. This course is part of the sequence of prescribed courses in the Public Relations major and will prepare students for the Public Relations Campaigns course (CMM466) - the capstone experience in the major. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: JOU206, CMM311.

PRE321 - Advertising in the Electronic Media (3 cr.)

An in-depth look into advertising in the broadcast industry and within emerging on-line technologies, with particular emphasis on the integration of audience research, the creative process and measurement of sales and media effectiveness. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM101, ENG101; CMM118.

PRE368 - Public Relations Cases (3 cr.)

A critical analysis of public relations practice in various organizations and professions. Emphasis on ethical and legal issues, core organizational values, trust and transparency. Examines models of communication management in planning, design and implementation of public relations strategy. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM311.

PRE466 - Public Relations Campaigns (3 cr.)

An advanced course in planning and executing basic public relations and publicity for various types of organizations, with emphasis on training in effective writing styles required of a public relations practitioner. Deals with analyzing communication needs of an organization and examines characteristics of successful public relations campaigns. Includes a service learning component in which students work on a public relations campaign. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM311 and JOU206.

PRE468 - Advanced Advertising Strategies (3 cr.)

An advanced course in advertising in the electronic and print media, with an in-depth examination and critique of advertising campaigns, including consumer, public relations, and political advertising. Deals with creative strategies, marketing vs. communication planning, and execution of campaigns, with special emphasis on practice in the United States and globally. Includes a service learning component in which students develop an advertising campaign for a client. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: CMM321.

PSC100 - U.S. National Politics (3 cr.)

A survey of the constitutional, political, and social bases of the American political system. Structure and functions of the leading institutions - presidency, bureaucracy, congress, courts - of the national government. Political issues and ways in which governmental decisions are made. (Fall, Spring, Summer). Liberal arts.

PSC110 - Studying Politics (1 cr.)

Introduction to the subject matter and methodology of the political science discipline for entering political science majors. Students are introduced to their fellow students, to their major professors, and to the crucial subdivisions of the major including, political theory, methodology, comparative politics, international relations, public law and public policy. Further, students are made aware of post-graduate study and vocational opportunities in political science, of experiential learning opportunities related to politics, such as internships and study abroad, and of various academic and personal support services within the department and on the campus. (Fall). Prerequisite: freshmen-level political science major

PSC120 - Comparative Politics (3 cr.)

This course surveys the government and politics in a global, comparative perspective. It studies how people govern themselves in different nation states. It introduces key concepts and frameworks with which to identify the structure and process of policy making and to evaluate the government output in selected nations. It hopefully enables students to judge the functions and performance of American government in a broad, transnational perspective. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

PSC220 - International Relations (3 cr.)

An overview of the study of international relations. The primary focus is the major theoretical approaches used to study international politics, while surveying the main topic areas within international relations. Major topics covered include the different levels of analysis used to study international politics, the state and non-state actors, the role of international law and institutions, war and national security, the international economy, and international environmental issues. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

PSC231 - History of Political Ideas (3 cr.)

An examination of core political ideas such as government, power, legitimacy, the state, sovereignty, justice, citizenship, equality, rights, interests, and the common good through selections drawn from important works of political thought that span some 2,500 years, from the ancient Greeks (Plato) to the eve of the French Revolution (Rousseau). A study of how each inventor of political ideas (e.g. Aristotle, Machiavelli) wrestles within their own time and place, with the most basic questions which human beings can ask about society - perennial questions about institutions and relations of power that never lose their relevance. (Fall or Spring). Liberal arts.

PSC240 - State and Local Government (3 cr.)

An introduction to the nature and the function of state, county, and municipal governments in the United States and the political environment in which they operate. The constitutional bases and evolutionary changes of these governments are studied in the context of both political behavior and the processes of governmental decision-making. Particular emphasis on New York State government and local governments within New York. (Fall - Spring, Winter, Summer). Liberal arts.

PSC282 - Political Ideals and Ideologies (3 cr.)

A study of political ideals such as order, liberty, equality, and justice as well as an examination of systems of interrelated political beliefs--political ideologies such as liberalism, socialism, anarchism, conservatism, feminism, environmentalism, and fundamentalism. Analyses the impact of politically relevant beliefs upon our understanding of complex political realities and our desire to rationalize to ourselves and justify to others the political choices that we make. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts.

PSC290 - Introduction to Law (3 cr.)

An introduction to the law, courts, and politics. Topics include legal history, jurisprudence, judicial powers, and judicial review. The course is focused on judicial decision making and the role of case law in the political and legal system. For global perspective, U.S. law is compared to the civil law system as well as international law. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

PSC311 - Quantitative Political Analysis (3 cr.)

An introduction to quantitative analytical methods as applied to the study of politics and public policy. Data gathering, descriptive and inferential statistics, tests of hypotheses, and basic mathematical modeling are covered. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three PSC credits (MAT161 recommended).

PSC319 - National Security in the 21st Century (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the threats and challenges faced by governments as they attempt to provide for national security in the current international environment. The central topics of this course are the security issues of greatest concern today: the proliferation of dangerous military technology, particularly nuclear weapons, international terrorism, and how "rogue" and failed states contribute to both threats. The course will also explore the potential security threats of the near future, such as environmental change, resource competition, demographic change, and the spread of disease. (Every three to four semesters). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSC220 or six credits of political science.

PSC320 - Ethnic Politics (3 cr.)

Examines polyethnic societies ranging from USA and Canada to Nigeria and Sri Lanka where effective control of economic and political life is closely related to patterns of dominance-subordination. Comparative study of how politics and government in polyethnic politics in the developed as well as developing worlds impact upon ethnic identity and relations of power among ethnocultural communities. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSC120 or PSC220 or junior standing.

PSC321 - Latin American Politics (3 cr.)

This course is an overview of the politics of Central and South America with particular emphasis on selected states such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Guatemala, Haiti, and Mexico. A principal focus is the historical, social, cultural, and political dynamics influencing democracy, development, and social change in Latin American states. Also includes regional relations with an emphasis on the impact of U.S. policies and intervention on Latin American states and societies. (Fall, Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: LAS111 or PSC120 or six PSC credits.

PSC323 - Japanese Politics and Diplomacy (3 cr.)

Japan is the most advanced and democratic Asian nation with growing postindustrial and postmodern syndromes. This course studies how the Japanese govern themselves and interact with the international community. Elite governance is the central theme of public policymaking analysis such as national defense and socioeconomic prosperity. This course also studies Japan's interactions with other Asian nations and the West. Game theory helps students to understand Japan's foreign policy and its role in globalization and postmodernization. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101 or POI.

PSC325 - Canadian Politics (3 cr.)

Study of the Canadian Political System - its major structures and their functions, its policy processes and selected strengths and weaknesses of political structures and policy processes noted; proposals for reform evaluated in the light of how effectively political conflicts are managed if not resolved. (Fall, Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three PSC credits or three CAS credits or POI.

PSC327 - European Politics (3 cr.)

A comparative political analysis of government and politics in European industrial democracies (i.e., France and the United Kingdom) as well as formerly totalitarian socialist nations undergoing political democratization and market economic reforms (e.g., Russia) within their respective contexts of history, economics, and political culture. Comparisons and contrasts between the composition and functions of selected democratic as well as democratizing European political systems as well as an overview of the supranational institutions of the European Union. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC120 or POI.

PSC329 - Asia Today (3 cr.)

A study of the current status of modernization and industrialization in Asia. A comparison of different stages of nation building in terms of political, socioeconomic, and cultural variables; key factors that facilitate or impede such progress. An exploration of different goals and aspirations manifested in Asia toward modernization, industrialization, Westernization, regionalism, and globalism. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100 or PSC120 or ASI110.

PSC334 - War (3 cr.)

This course explores the topic of war using political, social, and philosophical perspectives. The main topics covered include the various types of war, including interstate war, civil war, and terrorism; the causes of war; how societies mobilize to wage war; and the effects war has on society; and the ethics of waging war. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC220, six credits of political science, or junior status.

PSC335 - Politics of the World Economy (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the politics of international economic relations, in terms of both the politics of foreign economic policy and the interaction between states negotiating economic relations. The principal focus of the course is on how exposure to the international economy affects states, and in return how demands for specific policies from domestic interest groups affects how states interact with each other. Major topics include trade, capital flows, the role of international institutions and laws, the politics of development, the environment, and globalization. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC220 or six credits of political science.

PSC343 - U.S. Congress and Presidency (3 cr.)

Selection, organization, processes, and personalities of our national legislature and executive. Constitutional powers, inter-branch relations, and economic and foreign policymaking. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three PSC credits.

PSC344 - U.S. Political Parties and Interest Groups (3 cr.)

A study of the nature of political parties and interest groups, and their impact on elections, government, public policy, and political change. The similarities and differences between parties and interest groups as intermediary organizations linking citizens and government. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100.

PSC345 - U.S. Public Opinion and Voting Behavior (3 cr.)

Individual political thinking and polling trends nationwide and in New York State. Political candidates and the processes of party nomination and general election. Demographic and attitudinal foundations of voting choices in U.S. and N.Y. elections. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100.

PSC348 - Gender Politics (3 cr.)

A study of the theoretical, legal, and political roots of feminism in the United States, comparing different feminist ideologies and their impacts on 20th century feminism. Specific questions about the role of women in modern society and about gender-related policy implications are addressed. Constitutional rights of women and the political mobilization of women are covered as well. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: three PSC credits and/or three GWS credits.

PSC354 - Topics in U.S. Politics (1 to 3 cr.)

Course content varies based on current U.S. politics topics of sufficient importance to merit a semester's attention. Topics may be general (e.g., "Money and Politics") or specific (e.g., "Congressional Redistricting as a Political Process"). Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: six PSC credits.

PSC355 - Topics in Law (1 to 3 cr.)

Course content varies based on current law topics of sufficient importance to merit a semester's attention. Topics may be general (e.g., "The Politics of Judicial Selection in the U.S.") or specific (e.g., "Civil Liberties in a Time of Terrorism"). Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: six PSC credits.

PSC356 - Topics in Public Policy (3 cr.)

Course content varies based on current public policy topics of sufficient importance to merit a semester's attention. Topics may be general (e.g., "Shifts in Policy after Realigning Elections") or specific (e.g., "What Will the Department of Homeland Security Do?). Course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: six PSC credits.

PSC357 - Topics in World Affairs (1 to 3 cr.)

Course content varies based on current World Affairs topics of sufficient importance to merit a semester's attention. Topics may be general (e.g., "War and Ethics) or specific (e.g., "International Responses to Global Warming"). Course may be repeated for credit when topic varies. (occasional). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: six PSC credits.

PSC358 - Political Movements (3 cr.)

This course looks at political movements, broadly defined, and largely in the United States. A movement is a spontaneous "grassroots," issue-based political activity that takes place outside the traditional framework for political participation. The course focuses on the relationship between political movements and public policy - particularly sudden, non-incremental shifts in policy. Several important movements are examined as is their impact on politics and policy. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100.

PSC380 - Public Policy and Administration (3 cr.)

Analytical treatment of types of public policy and of the models and theories of the policy making process at the national level. Particular emphasis on the implementation and evaluation of policies by the federal bureaucracy. Secondary emphasis on the budgetary process. Several important policy areas are discussed and analyzed within the framework of the models and theories. (Fall, Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100.

PSC381 - U.S. Political Economy (3 cr.)

This course provides an assessment of the relationships among government, politics, and the economy, and is accessible to the student without an economics background. A modest amount of macroeconomic theory and a historical overview of the development of economic policies in the United States and globally combine to provide a basis from which to examine contemporary economic issues. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100.

PSC382 - Courts, Judges & Politics (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the U.S. judiciary at all levels of U.S. government. Topics include the judicial role in a constitutional republic, judicial selection and tenure, judicial organization and jurisdiction, judicial power and judicial restraint, judicial interaction with other political actors and with the public, the roles of attorneys and jurors in the American legal process, alternatives to judicial dispute resolution, judicial process, judicial policy making, and judicial impact and importance. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100 or PSC290.

PSC383 - Domestic Policy (3 cr.)

The course is an examination of the major strategic areas of U.S. Domestic Policy. These include: the economic and budgetary issues, public health, education, social welfare, and environment and criminal justice policies, and the cultural wars in social regulations. The course looks at the history of these areas from their emergence as policy concerns, through the growing role of the federal government, to their current status. There is also a comparison between the ways these issues are handled politically in the U.S. compared with other modern democracies. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100 (PSC380 recommended).

PSC385 - Environmental Politics (3 cr.)

This course covers environmental policy making along with the political issues surrounding environmental policy. The primary focus is on the development of environmental policies in the United States with a secondary focus on international efforts to prevent further environmental damage. Specific topics range from public health issues to endangered species to climate change. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100 or ENV201.

PSC390 - U.S. Constitutional Law (3 cr.)

An exploration of the origins and evolution of the U.S. Constitution from its adoption in 1787 to the present. Emphasis is on the role of judicial interpretation as the principal means by which the constitution is altered and the particular role of the U.S. Supreme Court in that process. Emphasis is on judicial doctrines related to issues of separation of powers, federalism, and constitutionally based rights and liberties. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100 or POI.

PSC391 - U.S. Civil Liberties (3 cr.)

An examination of the crucial role of the U.S. Supreme Court as definer and defender of constitutionally based civil rights and liberties. Particular emphasis is on the U.S. Bill of Rights and the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Legal and extra-legal influences on constitutional interpretation are assessed including the impact of judicial philosophy and ideology on constitutional interpretation. The Court's role in the U.S. governmental structure and its interactions with other political/legal actors is also assessed. Students read landmark Supreme Court decisions in civil rights and liberties cases. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSC100 or POI.

PSC393 - Global Law (3 cr.)

This course analyzes conflict resolution of global issues through political and judicial means. It identifies global issues such as human rights, environmental, economic, military-political problems of transboundary scope, and reviews international agreements and decisions of international and domestic tribunals. It also examines impacts and ramifications of global issues in terms of the dichotomy between zero-and positive-sum games. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

PSC399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

PSC451 - Seminar on Elections (3 cr.)

An assessment of the role of elections in democratic societies: voting systems, issues of suffrage, party and mass media roles. Electoral patterns including sectionalism, realignment, incumbency and interparty competition. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: senior standing or POI.

PSC452 - Seminar on U.S. Foreign Policy (3 cr.)

An examination of the formulation and execution of U.S. Foreign Policy, past, present and future with particular emphasis on the Post Cold War world. Objectives and Instruments of U.S. Foreign Policy. Foreign Policy process and Procedure. Domestic and international politics of U.S. Foreign Policy. Contemporary Issues. An overarching theme is U.S. power in world affairs, its sources, limits, magnitude, utility and ethics. Meets Writing Across the Curriculum requirement for Political Science majors. (Fall). Liberal arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: senior standing or POI.

PSC453 - Seminar on Political Persuasion (3 cr.)

This course examines rhetoric, symbolism, and imagery as elements of political persuasion as well as secrecy, censorship, and propaganda as elements of the manipulation of public opinion. A fundamental question in this course is how the use of these various elements affects the degree to which a society is democratic or autocratic. Governmental and political communications are covered along with popular culture. (Fall). Liberals arts. Approved AWR. Prerequisite: senior standing or POI.

PSC489 - Washington Internship Institute (3 to 15 cr.)

(Fall & Spring).

PSC495 - Undergraduate Research (1 to 3 cr.)

Research project arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Formal application process. May be repeated no more than once. (Fall). Prerequisite: POI.

PSC496 - Instructional Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Supervised tutoring and classroom instructional assistance in an introductory political science course (PSC100, PSC120, PSC220, PSC231, PSC311). Student and professor must specify exact duties by contract. Cannot be repeated. Graded on a pass/fail basis. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: POI and 12 credits of PSC including a minimum grade of B in the course to be taught.

PSC498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

Advanced field work under academic supervision. Participation in the work of government offices, political campaigns, interest groups, law offices. Full credit internships (15 credit hours per semester) have accompanying seminars. Internship credit does not replace course work requirements of PSC. Formal application process. (Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter). Prerequisites: variable.

PSC499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Individual work with a professor on any topic germane to political science. Independent studies cannot be used for courses that are offered normally. Formal application process. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisite: junior standing and POI

PSY101 - General Psychology (3 cr.)

Introductory course with major emphasis on basic concepts which characterize the laws of behavior. Topics include observation and measurement, learning, motivation, and important physiological, social and personality influence on normal and abnormal behavior are studied. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

PSY105 - General Psychology Recitation/Laboratory (1 cr.)

Methods and techniques of scientific inquiry used in psychology, including computer-simulated demonstrations, laboratory projects, small group discussion and written assignments. (1 hr/wk for full semester.) (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: concurrent or prior enrollment in PSY101.

PSY199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

PSY205 - Experimental Design (3 cr.)

Overview of research methods in psychological experimentation. Emphasis on the nature of scientific problems, the development of testable hypotheses and the design of experiments and descriptive research relevant to psychological phenomena. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisite: PSY101.

PSY206 - Psychological Statistics (3 cr.)

Overview of statistical methods in psychological research. Topics covered include measures of central tendency and dispersion, hypotheses testing, t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), correlation, regression, nonparametric tests. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: PSY101.

PSY299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Summer).

PSY301 - Applied Psychology Practicum (1 to 4 cr.)

This course is designed for students who will work under the supervision of a faculty member on some applied project such as assisting in the instruction of a course or working in a service agency in the community. A statement of the specific responsibilities of each student will be filed in the office of the department. (Fall - Spring). Prerequisites: POI; limited to two enrollments during undergraduate career.

PSY302 - Research Apprenticeship in Psychology (1 to 4 cr.)

Supervised research experience in laboratory or field settings through assisting a faculty member in some phase of his or her research. Content will be arranged individually between students and sponsoring faculty member. A statement of the specific responsibilities of each student will be filed in the office of the department. May be repeated for credit. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisite: POI.

PSY304 - Junior Psychology Seminar (3 cr.)

Seminar dealing with a current topic of interest in psychology. The goals of the course are to improve written and oral communication skills and to develop and improve ability to function in, contribute to, and to benefit from a small group, intellectual experience. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, PSY101, PSY205, PSY206.

PSY311 - Survey of Human Development (3 cr.)

An interdisciplinary survey of developmental changes over the human lifespan, and of the various influences accounting for them. From prenatal development of the fetus, to dying as an individual and social process, the major life periods are examined sequentially. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101.

PSY321 - Cognitive Psychology (3 cr.)

Examines the process by which information is extracted, interpreted, stored, retrieved and used. Topics may include sensation, perception, attention, memory, concept formation, imagery, language, problem solving, reasoning, decision making and social inference. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101.

PSY326 - Introduction to Art Therapy (3 cr.)

An introduction to an experiential overview of the field of art therapy, an interdisciplinary field combining principles and practices in art, psychology, sociology. (Fall - Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101; ART104 or ART161 or ART231; or POI.

PSY327 - Art Therapy Practicum (3 cr.)

The Art Therapy Practicum is a 3-credit course, combining site-based experiences with weekly art therapy supervision. Students offer individual and small group creative art experiences as well as related support activities in their settings. (every third semester). Prerequisites: PSY101; ART104, ART161 or ART231; PSY326 or ART325; and POI.

PSY331 - Introduction to Biopsychology (3 cr.)

A survey of biological components of behavior. The course assumes that evolution by natural selection applies to both biological and ecological components of behavior. Physiological mechanisms covered include those that relate to motivation and learning. Ecological considerations include the behaviors involved in the solution of ecological problems such as food, shelter, mates and predator avoidance. (Fall, Spring, Winter, Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101.

PSY340 - Personality (3 cr.)

A study of the major theories of personality including psychoanalytic, dispositional, phenomenological and behavioral strategies. Approaches to research in personality, personality assessment and measurement, and personality change and modification are examined. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101.

PSY361 - Social Psychology (3 cr.)

Major studies and theories concerning the individual's relations to other individuals and groups. Topics: affiliation, social perception, altruism, aggression, social influence. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101 or SOC101.

PSY399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

PSY400 - Special Topics in Psychology (1 to 9 cr.)

Course will specify particular set of clear objectives designed to deal with particular topics in psychology and particular course format. (Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: variable.

PSY408 - Psychology Senior Exam (0 cr.)

Course consists of administration of Psychology Senior Exam and reporting of results to students. Passing the exam is a graduation requirement for psychology majors. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisites: junior standing

PSY409 - History and Modern Systems of Psychology (3 cr.)

The background to the development of psychological systems for pre-Greek times to the present; the assumptions, historical origins, characteristics, and comparative achievements and shortcomings of each. (Winter, Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101, 12 additional PSY credits.

PSY412 - Educational Psychology (3 cr.)

A study of the cognitive and developmental psychological variables in the teaching-learning situation and their relation to individual and group instruction. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: six PSY credits.

PSY414 - Psychology of Infancy and Childhood (3 cr.)

The period of development from conception to adolescence covering the physical, emotional, social, intellectual and moral phases of child growth and development. An equal emphasis given to the periods of infancy and childhood, theoretical issues, research findings and applications. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY311.

PSY415 - Adolescence, Youth, and Early Adulthood (3 cr.)

Institutional, social and biological factors which interact to thrust the child into adolescence; youth and adulthood examined. Emphasis: development of psychological mechanisms which enhance the life of the individual. Occupational and marital adjustment; emphasis: pleasures and stresses of parenting and effective child rearing practices studied. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY311.

PSY416 - Psychology of Adult Development and Aging (3 cr.)

Theories and research evidence concerning developmental changes in person-environment interactions over second half of the lifespan. Normative characteristics, sex differences, and normal variation among individuals are noted in personality, intellectual abilities, and social behavior. Attention is given to clinical aspects of old age. Field experience with older persons is required. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY311.

PSY422 - Human Learning and Memory (3 cr.)

Basic research and theory in human learning and memory. Information processing, verbal learning, conditioning and social learning models. Applications to issues in behavior. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101, PSY321.

PSY424 - Perception and Sensory Processes (3 cr.)

A living organism interacts continuously with physical stimulus energies which provide it with information about states of itself and the external world. This course is concerned with the physical structures and the psychological processes by which the organism transduces those energies into neutral events and transforms those events into meaningful information for guiding behavior. Topics include species comparisons, physiological mechanisms in sensory systems, perception of form, depth, speech and motion, the perceptual constancies and illusions, color perception. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY321.

PSY430 - Neural Science and Behavior (3 cr.)

Topics in biopsychology and cellular/molecular biology within the field of neuroscience as it relates to normal as well as abnormal/deviant behavior. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101; PSY331 or BIO326.

PSY443 - Abnormal and Deviant Behavior (3 cr.)

A study of human aberrant behavior patterns as evidenced in mental illness, delinquency, crime and poor cultural adaptation. Emphasis is placed upon relating the contributions of the behavioral sciences to an integrated understanding of abnormal and deviant behavior of both individuals and groups. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY340.

PSY445 - Counseling Psychology (3 cr.)

Principles, theories and research issues in counseling psychology. Counseling process. Counseling ethics. Counseling as a profession. (Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101, PSY340.

PSY460 - Psychology of Women (3 cr.)

The course examines the biological, cognitive, and social contributions to the development of gender, the nature and magnitude of gender differences, and the psychological implications of experiences unique to women. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: PSY361.

PSY461 - Evolutionary Psychology (3 cr.)

Theory and research in the field of evolutionary psychology. The relevance and importance of evolutionary theory as it applies to major aspects of human behavior including mating, violence and aggression, altruism, family relationships and language. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101, PSY361.

PSY462 - Industrial and Organizational Psychology (3 cr.)

The course is an overview of the applications of psychological theory and research in organizations. The major contributions of Industrial and Organizational psychologists to understanding organizations and enhancing individual and organizational effectiveness will be explored. Topics include: employee selection, evaluation, and training; the effects of perception, communication, leadership, motivation and group dynamics on organizational behavior and effectiveness; the role of change and working conditions in organizational behavior and effectiveness. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY340 or PSY361.

PSY496 - Teaching Practicum (1 to 4 cr.)

Students will participate significantly in teaching a psychology course. Specific duties may include lecturing; leading laboratory and recitation groups; course, program, or student evaluation; and tutoring. If taken more than once, teaching practicum must be taken in different courses. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring). Prerequisites: junior standing, completion of 12 psychology credits, minimum grade of B in the course in which the student will be teaching, minimum GPA of 3.0 and POI.

PSY497 - Fieldwork Practicum (1 to 6 cr.)

Fieldwork at local agencies and schools with children and adults. The general goals are to gain experience with prevention and treatment issues with various populations, to learn about the operation of community agencies and educational institutions, and to relate fieldwork experience to psychological principles. Responsible, professional contact with clients is required. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior standing, 2.50 GPA, POI, relevant course work.

PSY498 - Internship (1 to 15 cr.)

Internship at local agencies and schools with children and adults. The general goals are to gain experience with prevention and treatment issues with various populations, to learn about the operation of community agencies and educational institutions, and to relate fieldwork experience to psychological principles. Responsible, professional contact with the agencies and clients is required. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisites: junior standing, 2.5 cumulative g.p.a., by formal application.

PSY499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

PSY501 - Psychometrics (3 cr.)

Quantitative analyses and interpretation of data obtained from psychological tests, multivariate statistical methods, and related computer analysis procedures used in evaluating and interpreting test data. Students will learn concepts and analysis procedures to assist them in choosing appropriate assessment tools for diagnostic, instructional, research, or program evaluation purposes, and how to summarize and report the results of such analyses. (Spring). Prerequisite 9 hours of psychology.

PSY503 - Academic Interventions (3 cr.)

A focus of this course is the Response to Intervention model (Grades K-12). This course will present an overview of New York State (NYS) regulations of regular and special education, staffing roles within a school, components of an effective classroom, formative and summative assessments, components of academic learning, deficits of learning, how to assess and identify academic learning, accurately choose evidence-based interventions based on the identified deficit area, and what it takes to monitor the progress of those interventions. Graduate students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding and knowledge of academic interventions with students in Grades K-12 who are demonstrating difficulties. (Fall). Prerequisite: school psychology graduate student.

PSY504 - Master's Thesis (3 cr.)

The Master's thesis is written on a topic chosen by the student in consultation with faculty sponsors. The thesis may be in one of four categories: original research; replication of research; scholarly critique and analysis; or theoretical formulation or development of a statistical technique. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisite: School Psychology graduate majors only.

PSY509 - Foundations of School Psychology (3 cr.)

Students are introduced to the roles and functions of school psychologists, with emphasis on "best practices" in the field. An overview of the profession is provided, and students will begin to develop perspectives of the profession. (Fall). Prerequisites: School Psychology Majors only.

PSY516 - Advanced Development (3 cr.)

A comprehensive survey of human development from conception to late adolescence including biological, social/cultural and psychological factors influencing human development. (Fall). Prerequisites: 9 hrs. of psychology.

PSY520 - Learning and Cognition (3 cr.)

Study of the basic human learning processes and cognitive and academic skills. Emphasis is on the relevance of recent research and theoretical developments in cognitive psychology to instructional settings, and on appreciating diversity in learning and cognitive abilities. This course builds a foundation of knowledge that will enable students to later develop and evaluate appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs. Topics include theories of learning, attention, memory, problem solving, reasoning, metacognition, social cognitive theory, attribution theory, and experimental paradigms for the study of cognition and learning. (Spring). Prerequisites: 9 hours in psychology.

PSY531 - Neuropsychology (3 cr.)

A course in the School Psychology Graduate Program which focuses on the neural basis of behavior. Both theoretically-based and empirically-based principles of the brain-behavior relationship as they apply throughout the life span are covered. Measurement of the brain-behavior relationship and the development of ecologically-based treatments are included. (Spring). Prerequisite: PSY543.

PSY543 - Learning Disabilities (3 cr.)

A comprehensive, applied course in the theories and research involving learning disabilities. The course has as its focus the Federal Regulations concerning children with handicapping conditions (IDEA, ADA) as well as New York State regulations (Part 200). The class is taught from the psychoeducational perspective and includes discussion of alternative service delivery systems and procedures for selecting appropriate environments for students who are learning disabled. Readings, lectures, case law, and case studies lead to knowledge of clinical differentiation based on current research on learning disabilities. (Spring). Prerequisites: PSY545.

PSY544 - Intellectual Assessment (3 cr.)

Intellectual assessment is designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the process of cognitive assessment, including administration, scoring, and interpretation of intellectual ability tests. Students will become familiar with the use of data based assessment skills that can be transferred for use with other tests. Similarities and differences, as well as pros and cons of tests will be discussed (Fall). Prerequisite: School Psychology majors only.

PSY545 - Assessment Issues in School Psychology (3 cr.)

Provides students with exposure to a variety of methods in the assessment of learning and socio-emotional disorders. The course will emphasize "best practices" in the assessment and diagnosis of learning and behavior disorders. Students will develop skill in the administration, scoring, interpretation, and report writing of select measures. (Fall). Prerequisite: PSY544.

PSY546 - Special Populations and School Psychology (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide a foundation of knowledge regarding special populations within the school environment. Students will understand the defining characteristics of specific learning, sensory, neurological, and psychological disorders as well as develop skill in the identification and academic interventions for these disorders. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisites: nine hours of psychology.

PSY550 - Consultation and Intervention I (3 cr.)

Psychology 550 is the first in a two semester course sequence designed to provide a foundation of skills in the areas of behavioral consultation and academic and behavioral interventions. Students will build knowledge about and practice using the stages of behavioral consultation. This includes understanding of operationalizing a problem and defining goals, functional assessment, and evaluating outcomes. (Spring). Prerequisite: School Psychology graduate majors only.

PSY551 - Consultation and Intervention II (3 cr.)

Psychology 551 is the second in a two semester course sequence designed to provide a foundation of skills in areas of behavioral consultation and academic and behavioral interventions. Students apply skills learned about school consultation in psychology 550 through work with intervention cases. Students will develop a repertoire of behavioral and academic intervention skills. (Fall). Prerequisite: PSY550.

PSY552 - Counseling and Crisis Intervention in Schools (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes the development of skills in individual and group counseling, and crisis intervention as relevant to the school setting. Direct application of these skills will occur through work in the classroom and school setting. (Spring). Prerequisites: School Psychology graduate majors only.

PSY553 - Information Technology Lab (1 cr.)

The Information Technology Lab is designed to provide students with knowledge and skills in using information technologies available to school psychologists. Students will receive training in the use of current software utilized in intellectual, achievement, behavioral, and neurophysical assessment, and utilized in the analysis and storage of data. Students will also receive training in how to use technology to access information sources relevant to providing quality services, and in how to use technology to safeguard protected information. (Fall).Prerequisites: School Psychology graduate majors only.

PSY554 - Advanced Counseling & Crisis Intervention in Schools (3 cr.)

This course emphasizes counseling skills and knowledge necessary to successfully engage children and adolescents at differing developmental stages and various presenting problems. Understanding the developmental needs and abilities of children and adolescents, and matching counseling techniques and strategies to common psychological and behavioral issues is the focus of the class. Direct application of these skills will occur through work in the classroom and school. (Spring). Prerequisite: graduate majors only.

PSY581 - Research Methods (3 cr.)

Design, statistical analysis, and interpretation of research in applied settings. Includes quasi-experimental design, program evaluation, and qualitative research. (Fall). Prerequisites: nine hours of psychology.

PSY589 - Advanced School Psychology Practicum (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide opportunity to apply skills learned in other course work this semester. As in PSY597 students continue to work individually and in teams in local schools and the university Psychoeducational Clinic in a variety of capacities, including psychoeducational assessments and interventions, school-based programs and counseling. In addition, students are expected to take a more active role in each capacity. (Spring). Prerequisite: School psychology graduate majors only.

PSY590 - Internship (3 or 6 cr.)

The Internship is designed to advance the graduate student's professional skill through full-time placement in the schools. Under the direct supervision of an on-site or state or nationally certified School Psychologist, the Intern will complete assignments which encompass the full range of school psychologist leadership and functioning in schools. The Internship is the culmination of classroom and field experience from the first three semesters, and will prepare the graduate student for employment in a school setting upon graduation. May be repeated for a total of 9 credits. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisites: satisfactory completion of all program requirements (with the exception of PSY504 Master's Thesis) and a State Education Department Internship Certificate.

PSY597 - School Psychology Practicum (2 to 6 cr.)

This course is designed to provide opportunity to apply skills learned in coursework that semester. Students work individually and in teams in local schools and the university Psychoeducational Clinic in a variety of capacities, including psycheducational assessments and interventions, school-based program implementation and evaluation, and counseling. Can be repeated twice for a total of six credits. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisite: graduate majors only.

PSY599 - Independent Study (1 to 9 cr.)

The Independent Study is designed to allow students to conduct research or to investigate a line of study that is unavailable through regular course selection. Under the direct supervision of a faculty member, the student will conduct the research in a format preapproved by the faculty sponsor, faculty advisor, Department Chair, and Dean. The study may involve a range of approaches from a literature review to an application of theory. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisites: minimum of 4 graduate hours in psychology.

RDG100 - College Reading (2 cr.)

Reading 100 accompanies English 100 (Writers Workshop). The same text is used in both courses so that the readings provide a basis for the writings. Reading 100 provides the students the opportunity to work in depth with the material. Class time will also be used to underline, to take notes, to outline, to look up vocabulary words or historical background, and to read related materials. The format of the course will primarily be class discussion and participation. Several kinds of tests and discussion of the effectiveness of each kind will prepare students to reread and retest in order to learn to become successful test takers. (Fall/Spring).

RDG110 - Critical Reading (3 cr.)

Develops students skills in evaluating oral and written material. Focuses on analysis of logic and evidence. Strengthens critical thinking and communication skills through written critiques of expository prose. Builds general knowledge through interactive readings across disciplines, with emphasis on contemporary international issues and concerns. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts.

RDG199 - Independent Study (1 to 3 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall & Spring).

RUS111 - Elementary Russian I (0 or 3 cr.)

Beginning study of Russian with emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and the cultures of the Russian sphere of influence. Open to students without previous knowledge of Russian or to those who have had no more than two years of Russian in high school. (Fall). Liberal arts.

RUS112 - Elementary Russian II (0 or 3 cr.)

Continuation of RUS111. Liberal arts material in the language laboratory. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: RUS111, or 85 or higher on the Regents Exam, or placement by exam

RUS199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

RUS299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SCI112 - BodyWorks: Heart Disease (1 cr.)

A multidisciplinary approach integrating biological, chemical and public health concepts related to heart disease. Topics covered include: basic heart anatomy, ions important for proper heart function, the electrical system of the heart, risk factors, contributing factors, disease states found in the heart, treatment options, and ideas for heart disease prevention. (Fall). Liberal arts.

SCI120 - Science in Everyday Life - How Things Work (4 cr.)

An introduction to classical physical science with applications in the arts, sports, and the environment that is specifically directed toward how common devices and processes work. In the laboratory, students will perform activities that are useful in everyday life. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

SCI185 - Safety in the Modern Laboratory (1 cr.)

A survey of safety approaches used in the modern science laboratory and the Federal and State regulations enacted to ensure worker safety and a healthy environment. Designed for those who will assume professional positions requiring responsibility for the laboratory safety and health of themselves, others, and the environment.

SCI188 - Renewable Energy Fundamentals (4 cr.)

An introduction to the use of renewable energy processes and devices for everyday living. Practical evaluations of passive and active solar thermal and electrical systems, biomass conversion, wind power, heat pumps, fuel cells and energy conservation for residential and transportation use. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: Completion of GE math requirement.

SCI188L - Solar Home Design Lab (0 cr.)

(Fall).

SCI199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

SCI207 - Organic Farming (3 cr.)

The application of science, humanities, business and appropriate technologies to the design and management of sustainable organic farming systems. A holistic approach to agriculture and agricultural development based on traditional, alternative, and local farming. Linking ecology, socio-economics and culture to sustain organic production, farming communities, and environmental health. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.

SCI299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SCI361 - The Evolution of Scientific Thought (3 cr.)

A course designed to give students an understanding of the nature of science and scientific thought; its philosophical assumptions; its logical structure; aspects of its history, development and impact on Western and World culture. Examples will be taken from astronomy, physics, chemistry, biology and geology. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: completion of the Distributive Requirement in science.

SCI399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

SCI430 - Science Teaching Methods 7-12 (3 cr.)

Designed to prepare pre-service intermediate and commencement teacher candidates to become competent science teachers who can guide and facilitate interactions to meet the learning needs of diverse populations of students. Course is intended for Adolescence Education (7-12) majors in biology, chemistry, earth science, and physics. Issues, strategies, and resources for science teaching will be examined through individual and group work involving class projects, peer teaching and authentic presentations. Students will be expected to begin to develop a professional portfolio, use self-reflection, and peer review to refine work. (Fall). Prerequisites: one of the following: PHY314, BIO304, BIO305, CHE240, CHE242, GEL101, or POI; junior standing.

SCI496 - Teaching Practicum (3 cr.)

A supervised teaching experience giving interested students the opportunity to create, construct, and administer laboratory experiments in physics under the guidance of an experienced faculty member. Students will also perform supervised peer evaluation in a variety of circumstances. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: Students must have received a B or better in the course they are serving as teaching aids, and they should be determined to be superior students, qualified to perform the necessary activities, by the instructor in charge.

SCI499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SCI504 - Professional Science Internship (3 to 6 cr.)

Specialized graduate level course for the Professional Science Master's (PSM) program. Application of science and organizational skills in an internship setting for PSM degree candidates. Advanced writing of an internship proposal and final report. Each student will give an oral presentation as part of the internship requirements. (Fall). Prerequisites: graduate student standing in the M.S. Natural Science Professional Science Masters program or POI.

SCI505 - Graduate Seminar in Natural Science (1 to 2 cr.)

Graduate-level seminar. Specialized topics in science. Topics vary with instructor and semester but potential subjects include genetics, bioinformatics, landscape ecology, global climate change, advanced concepts in biology, chemistry, environmental science, geology, and others. Advanced concepts will be developed through reading original research papers and interactive discussions led by graduate students. Course can be repeated for credit up to three credits total. (Spring). Prerequisite: Graduate Student Standing.

SCI510 - Research Methods (3 cr.)

Specialized graduate-level research methods course. Introduction to research methods and proposal development for master's thesis work. Advanced writing of the required thesis proposal for a master's in natural science degree. Each student will give an oral presentation and submit a written master's research proposal. (Spring). Prerequisite: Graduate Student Standing.

SCI530 - Science Teaching Methods (7-12) (3 cr.)

Prepares adolescence teacher candidates to become competent science teachers meeting the learning needs of diverse students using the standards of the National Science Teachers Association and the New York State Education Department. Intended for Masters of Science in Teaching Adolescence Education (7-12) candidates in Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics. Issues, strategies, and resources for science teaching will be examined through class projects, peer teaching and authentic laboratory presentations. Preparation of a curricular budget, advanced topics in assessment and rubric development, and design and assessment of science laboratory learning experiences to meet New York State Standards will be emphasized. Students develop a professional portfolio using self-reflection and peer review. (Fall). Prerequisites: Graduate or senior standing; PHY314, or BIO304, or BIO305, or CHE240, or CHE242, or GEL310, or GEL102 or POI.

SCI594 - Applied Graduate Research (1 to 6 cr.)

Research project undertaken in connection with an internship or practicum experience, under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. Written report required. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

SCI599 - Independent Study (1 to 12 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

SCM301 - Global Operations Management (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to the theories and practices of global operations of supply chain systems. Topics include supply chain operations strategy, product design & learning curves, process analysis, manufacturing and service process design, supply chain forecasting & aggregate planning, supply chain efficiency and responsiveness analysis, global inventory control, material requirements planning, and global operations scheduling. Prerequisite: MGM280.

SCM370 - Supply Chain Management (3 cr.)

Supply chain management focuses on managing material and information outside of the factory walls including aspects of product design collaboration, demand planning and forecasting, inventory deployment, distribution system design, channel management, procurement, and logistics. Supply chain management (SCM) is a system approach to managing the entire flow of information, materials, and services from raw materials suppliers through factories and warehouses to the end-customer. SCM represents a philosophy of doing business that stresses processes and integration. (Fall & Spring). Prerequisite: MGM280.

SCM375 - Project/Process Management (3 cr.)

This course examines how organizations can develop and leverage excellence in process management. It examines the organization, planning, and controlling of projects and provides practical knowledge on managing project scope, schedule, and resources. Topics include project life cycle, business process reengineering, work breakdown structure, Gantt charts, network diagrams, scheduling techniques, and resource allocation decision modeling. (Spring).

SCM377 - Warehousing and Inventory Management (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the marketing logistics functions of warehousing and inventory management in a global, customer service-oriented, supply-chain context. Major topics include warehouse location, operations, layout, forecasting; inventory valuation; safety stocks; and order quantities. (Every 3rd semester, Fall). Prerequisites: ACC201, MGM280.

SCM378 - Quality Management (3 cr.)

This course provides an overview of the Total Quality Management (TQM) movement and how the application of TQM techniques achieves customer satisfaction, continuous improvement, and employee involvement. Topics covered include pioneers of the total quality movement, the importance of leadership and information, quality planning, human resource development and training, process management, quality and operations measurements, customer satisfaction, buyer/supplier relationships, and Baldridge and Excelsior Awards for Excellence. Factors contributing to successful/unsuccessful implementation of TQM programs are reviewed. Prerequisite: SCM301.

SCM380 - International Uniform Commercial Code (3 cr.)

One of the most basic questions that is asked when a dispute arises between a buyer and a seller from different countries is "what law will govern the dispute?" In the United States, the Uniform Commercial Code is the law that is used to settle disputes arising from the purchase and sale of goods. Foreign nations have similar laws. International treaties and conventions are a third source of law that parties may use to settle problems. The parties, by agreement, can decide what law they want to apply. The United Nations Convention on Contracts for the International Sale of Goods (CISG) has been adopted by many nations, including the United States. (Spring). Prerequisites: ACC351, SCM370.

SCM382 - System Dynamics and Supply Chains (3 cr.)

This course introduces system dynamics modeling for the analysis supply chain dynamics. Emphasis in on linkages that must be recognized in the design and management of physical distribution systems, including the consequences of constraints and bottlenecks on system performance. Students will learn to visualize a supply chain in terms of the structures and policies that create dynamics and regulate performance. The course also examines strategies for enterprise and extraprise integration including stumbling blocks for supply chain integration such as high transaction costs between partners, poor information availability, and the challenges of managing complex interfaces between functionally separate enterprises. (Every third spring semester). Prerequisites: ECO260, SCM370.

SCM403 - Cross-Border Goods and Human Services (3 cr.)

This course focuses on the special logistical, legal, and regulatory needs of moving goods, information, and services across borders, physically or electronically. Cross-border relationships and the special needs involved in recruiting and moving skilled labor and executive talent across borders, on a temporary or permanent basis, are also covered. Special emphasis on the practicality and detailed paperwork involved in cross-border operations and transactions between Canada and the U.S. (Every 3rd semester, Spring). Prerequisites: MGM280, SCM370.

SCM435 - Transnational Issues in Supply Chain (3 cr.)

This course is an introduction to transnational issues in global supply chain systems, and it is a study of cause and effect of transnational strategies and tactics. Students will analyze issues, problems, and future business implications of transnational practices and will conduct critical analyses of various transnational supply chain cases, preparing the learner for application of theories in the transnational supply chain environment. (Spring). Prerequisites: SCM301, SCM370.

SCM444 - Selected Topics in Supply Chain Management (3 cr.)

Studies in diverse supply chain topics. Topics vary with each offering and may include capacity requirements planning, current supply chain practices, security in logistics, cross-border trade and ARC routing, or critical supply chain approaches. May be repeated once for credit as topics change. (Varies According to Topic). Prerequisites: junior standing and SCM370 or POI.

SCM447 - Lean Organizing and Manufacturing (3 cr.)

Lean Organizing and Manufacturing examines the concepts for designing, planning and improving manufacturing and service organizations. Topics include enterprise resource planning, facility layout, forecasting, queuing models, inventory management, focused factory, the transparent workplace, lean product development, value stream mapping, and continuous improvement. These tools, techniques and philosophies have been used worldwide by best-in-class companies to improve their bottom line, make them more competitive, and drastically improve their responsiveness to the customer. (Fall). Prerequisites: MGM350, ECO362.

SCM470 - U.S. Customs Laws (3 cr.)

This course examines the various laws and regulations that govern the ability of a company to compete in the global marketplace. The customs specialist must also be concerned with making the supply chain safer and more secure. Topics include a basic guide, exporting licenses, forbidden customers, foreign trade zones, U.S. Customs resources, tariff and tax regulations, and trade forms. The course also examines Harmonized Tariffs, rates of duty, country of origins, and valuation. The student is also introduced to Security and Anti-Terrorism Protocols and the Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism. (Every 3rd semester, Fall, Spring). Prerequisites: ACC351, SCM370.

SCM495 - Global Supply Chain Strategy (3 cr.)

This capstone course develops and integrates the major themes and strategies of Supply Chain Management. The focus is on the system design, structure, capacity and management of an integrated supply chain. Subject matter includes cross-functional analysis and treatment of sourcing/supply, distribution/transportation, maintenance/operations and related logistics support issues in a system-wide approach. Main themes developed are the necessity of an integrative approach to strategy, policy, and decision making and the need to emphasize system commonality of sourcing distribution and operations to form an integrated supply chain. (Fall). Prerequisites: SCM301, SCM370.

SOC101 - Introduction to Sociology (3 cr.)

Concepts and methods used in sociological investigations of interpersonal relations. Relationship of the group to the individual; stratification of society; variability of culture. (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter). Liberal arts.

SOC199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SOC265 - Self in Society (3 cr.)

Introduction to theories and research focusing on the individual in the context of society and interpersonal relations. Topics: socialization and formation of self and self attitudes, interpersonal behavior, attitudes and emotion, interpersonal perception, group dynamics. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts.

SOC299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring).

SOC300 - Research Methods I (3 cr.)

Overview of sociological explanations, project design and methods of research. Issues of measurement. Introduction to descriptive statistics. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101; MAT160 or MAT161.

SOC301 - Research Methods II: Quantitative (3 cr.)

Overview of quantitative research design and strategies of data collection, inferential statistics and computer assisted data management. Students will be required to design and complete a research project. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC300.

SOC302 - Research Methods II: Qualitative (3 cr.)

Overview of qualitative research design methods stressing historical, ethnographic and ethnomethodological techniques, interviewing, content analysis and field observation. Students will be required to design and complete a research project. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC300.

SOC303 - Sociology of Development in the Americas (3 cr.)

Effects of development and global integration of the economy and culture on peripheral urban and rural peoples in the Western Hemisphere. Topics include notions of underdevelopment, branch-plant industry, agri-export economies, subsistence and informal economies, migration, international tourism, squatter settlements, environmental issues related to development, women in development, and movements for local autonomy. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC304 - Sustainable Communities and Cultural Studies in Southern Mexico (4 cr.)

Students will consider philosophies, theories, and aspects of development and community, especially from indigenous perspectives. Includes meetings with nongovernmental organizations and community activists, as well as fieldtrips to communities and project sites. Enrollment is limited to students participating in the Oaxaca Study Abroad Program. Course is bilingual, English-Spanish. (Fall). Liberal arts. Corequisite: SPA213 or higher. Prerequisite: SPA112 or equivalent.

SOC305 - Sociology of Women (3 cr.)

This course examines the social construction of gender. Students will explore the impact of gender on women's everyday experiences, including work and family situations, and the different ways in which gender structures women's lives depending on their race, social class and age. (Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101 or GWS101.

SOC307 - Social Problems and Social Policy (3 cr.)

Examination of U.S. and world social problems. Focus on the social/political dynamics involved in the construction, causes, consequences of and alternative solutions to various issues/problems. Theoretical approaches are explored and contrasted. Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC309 - Sociology of Aging and Death (3 cr.)

This course examines the impact of social structure and history on the experience of aging and death. Age as a basis of social stratification, and the intersection of age with gender, social class, and race or ethnicity. Major issues facing older Americans and anticipated changes in these issues for future generation of elderly people will be examined. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101 or PSY101.

SOC312 - Sociology of Families (3 cr.)

A comparative analysis of family organization in different societies, emphasizing comparisons to contemporary families in the United States. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC313 - Sociology of Religion (3 cr.)

The course examines religion in social context: as systems of beliefs, symbols and rituals. Topics include theories of religious organization and behavior, types of religious groups, social definitions of the sacred and profane, and scientific versus religious bases of knowledge. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC314 - Sociology of Mental Health & Illness (3 cr.)

Sociological analyses of mental health and illness: Social processes involved in the etiology and treatment of mental disorder. Epidemiological research on mental health and illness in the U.S. Contemporary policies and issues. Instruction will involve lecture, readings, individual student research projects, films and guest speakers. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: PSY101 or SOC101.

SOC315 - Sociology of Health and Medicine (3 cr.)

Sociological and social-historical analysis of health and health care. Factors which influence people's response to illness. Survey and comparison of health problems and practitioners in different societies. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC316 - Working in Society (3 cr.)

The social organization of work and working in the U.S. and the world. How the labor markets operate, and how they differ across the world. How gender, race, and class affect working, including alienation and satisfaction. The influence of changing technology. How globalizing economic structures affect working in different countries. Labor/ management relations, unionization, and workplace democracy. (Spring, Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC321 - Sociology of Race and Ethnicity (3 cr.)

Social status, culture, and problems of racial and ethnic groups in the United States from the colonial period to the present, including current immigration in a global context. Factors which facilitate or restrict immigration, integration, and assimilation or promote ethnic diversity and movements for autonomy of groups within the broader society. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC323 - Sociology of Community (3 cr.)

Concept of community which concentrates on the empirically descriptive nature of such structures; theoretical and normative aspects of the community. Relationships between interaction and commitment of groups to a specific place; structured interaction of groups defined by the spatial scene. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC325 - Sociology of Urban Life in North America (3 cr.)

The political economy of the city and its sociological consequences. Selected cities in Canada, Mexico and the U.S. will be examined in comparative perspective. The historic legacy and factors determining recent social patterns will be analyzed, including the following: class composition, mobility, ethnicity and subculture formation, urban problems and prospects. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC331 - Sociology of Organizations (3 cr.)

The structure and functioning of formal organizations and their effect on individuals and social institutions. Critiques of bureaucratic structure and alternative forms of organization. Consideration of the use of organizations for social change, policy implementation and profit. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC334 - Ethnography in Southern Mexico (4 cr.)

Classroom instruction in ethnographic techniques combined with extended field trip throughout the rural region of Southern Mexico, including Chiapas and Oaxaca, visiting a variety of environments (cloud forest, rain forest, Pacific coast mangrove regions, coffee-growing highlands), communities and indigenous peoples. Independent residence in rural indigenous community for ethnographic research. Enrollment limited to students participating in the Southern Mexico Program. SOC334 and LAS334 are bilingual, English and Spanish. SPA334 fieldwork and written work are in Spanish. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites for LAS334 and SOC334: SPA214, SOC304/LAS304. Prerequisites for SPA334: SPA315, SOC304/LAS304, or POI.

SOC340 - Sociological Theory (3 cr.)

Overview of sociological theory with emphasis on the work of classical European sociologists. Liberal arts. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC342 - Political Sociology (3 cr.)

The course examines the social influences of the uses of power and the nature of politics in contemporary societies. Political action and political behavior will be analyzed in formal organizations (state, parties, movements) and in the larger national and world political arenas. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC355 - Sociology of Law (3 cr.)

The course explores the nature of law and develops an understanding of law as a social institution from a variety of sociological perspectives. The functions and forms of law are analyzed in relation to changes in cultural, economic, and political conditions as well as various forms of inequality. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC367 - Sociology of the Environment (3 cr.)

In the context of current dynamics associated with globalization, Sociology of the Environment approaches environmental issues through a sociological perspective. Topics include: social ideas of nature, environmental justice, environmental social movements, international environmental policy/issues, and the nexus between environmental science and politics. (Spring). Liberal arts.

SOC388 - Social Change and Social Movements (3 cr.)

Examines the theory and examples of social movements based in social classes or independent areas of the world system; for example labor movements, fascist nationalism, or individual rights movements. Also looks at "new social movements" based on cultural values and personal identity; for example movements for gay rights and for environmental objectives. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC393 - Topics in Criminal Justice (3 cr.)

Significant topics relating to the analysis of crime and its correction in modern societies will be offered so as to utilize the research specializations of faculty and provide students with an opportunity to study topics not covered in depth in other courses. Examples: corporate crime, private policing. (Winter, Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SOC399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer, Fall).

SOC403 - Research Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Designed to allow an individual or small group of students to engage in sociological research. Students will be expected to meet once a week with the supervising faculty member, research and read related literature and produce written assignments including, but not limited to, a final paper. Projects may emphasize quantitative and/or qualitative research. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC300, POI.

SOC406 - Sociology of Peace and War (3 cr.)

Examination of the causes of war, from social-psychological theories, to group dynamics, to global, social-structural level explanations. Examination of the potentials for peace, including the positive peace of widespread social justice. Analysis of the costs of war: personal, economic, and social costs. Sociological analysis of specific instances of war and peace, historical and current. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101 and junior standing.

SOC430 - Social Stratification (3 cr.)

Addresses the questions: who gets what and why? How are social resources (e.g., money, status, power) allocated? Why is there inequality? Focus is on class, race, gender, global inequalities and comparisons of systems. (Spring/Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101.

SOC441 - Sociology of Globalization (3 cr.)

Utilizes a sociological perspective to critically examine the current dynamics of what is now known as "globalization." By placing individual biographies within a larger systemic perspective, sociology provides a crucial lens for developing an analysis of the causes and consequences of globalized economies, politics, media, and culture. Phenomena glossed as globalization have differing impacts on individuals and societies. Differently situated individuals experience globalization in varying ways. Sociology is uniquely positioned to analyze these dynamics in terms of the salience of larger categories such as gender, race, class, geopolitical location. Additionally, sociological themes such as power of transnational corporations and social movements that aim to resist that power will be addressed in the course. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SOC101 and one other upper-level sociology course.

SOC491 - Sociology Seminar (3 cr.)

Capstone seminar for sociology majors. Concerned with selected issues in sociology, topics vary from semester to semester. Application of the sociological imagination to a specific topic. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, SOC101, six sociology credits.

SOC496 - Instructional Practicum (3 cr.)

Supervised tutoring or classroom instructional assistance in a sociology or criminal justice course. Each student and instructor will complete a contract specifying each student's duties. Cannot be repeated. Grading will be pass/fail. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisites: POI, SOC 101 and a grade of B or better in the course in which the student will work, junior or senior standing.

SOC497 - Applied Sociology Seminar (3 cr.)

This course will be taken concurrently with SOC498. It will provide an opportunity for interns to critically evaluate their internship experience and discuss the broad issues that emerge (e.g., problems of bureaucracies, ways of fostering change, etc.). (Fall). Liberal arts. Co-requisites: SOC498 Prerequisites: POI.

SOC498 - Applied Sociology Internship (1 to 12 cr.)

The student placed as an intern in a private or public organization will apply social science methods and theories to a topic of current concern to the host organization. Participation 9 to 18 hr/wk required. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Co-requisites: SOC497 Prerequisites: POI and chairperson; must be taken concurrently with SOC497.

SOC499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter).

SPA111 - Elementary Spanish I (0 to 3 cr.)

Beginning study of Spanish with emphasis on speaking, listening, reading, writing, and the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Open to students without previous knowledge of Spanish or to those who have had no more than two years of Spanish in high school. (Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter). Liberal arts.

SPA112 - Elementary Spanish II (0 to 3 cr.)

Continuation of SPA111. (Fall, Spring, Summer, Winter). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA111, or 85 or higher Regents Exam, or placement by exam.

SPA150 - Intensive Spanish Review (3 cr.)

For students who have successfully completed 2-3 years of Spanish recently in high school or have placed in this course by examination. A review and expansion of Spanish linguistic structures and cultural studies. SPA150 is the equivalent of SPA111-SPA112. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: 2-3 years of high-school Spanish, or 85 or higher on the Regents Exam, or placement by exam.

SPA151 - Spanish for the Professions: Business, Nursing, Tourism (3 cr.)

A review of Spanish linguistic structures with an emphasis on oral proficiency focusing on specific needs of business, tourism or nursing students. For students with 2-3 years of high school Spanish, through placement exam or POI. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: 2-3 years of Spanish recently in high school or have place in this course by examination.

SPA199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SPA213 - Intermediate Spanish I (0 to 3 cr.)

Sequence for SPA112 or SPA150. Systematic review and practice of Spanish-language skills as well as expansion of cultural studies. (Fall , Spring, Winter). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA112 or SPA150, or placement by exam.

SPA214 - Intermediate Spanish II (0 to 3 cr.)

Continuation of SPA213 and preparation for Spanish composition and conversation. (Fall , Spring, Winter). Prerequisite: SPA213, or placement by exam.

SPA299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

SPA310 - Oral Proficiency for Heritage Speakers of Spanish (3 cr.)

Public speaking in Spanish. The course will develop the oral and written proficiency skills of heritage speakers from all disciplines through oral presentations (introductory, informative and persuasive speeches), debates, and storytelling. Placement exams required. Liberal arts. (Spring). Prerequisites: oral proficiency interview at the level of intermediate high.

SPA314 - Conversacion (3 cr.)

Expansion and improvement of oral expression through discussions and analysis of readings on popular culture, music, film, and everyday life in Latin America and the Iberian Peninsula; will include as well academic debates on specialized issues. Not for native speakers. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA214, or POI.

SPA315 - Composicion (0 to 3 cr.)

Extensive practice reading and writing in Spanish, with assignments involving a variety of genres, topics, and styles. Practical analysis of the more difficult grammatical structures, to develop greater skill in written expression. Approved AWR. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101, SPA214, SPA314.

SPA385 - Introduccion to Hispanoamerica I: Epoca pre-Colonial-Siglo XIX (3 cr.)

A survey of the cultures and societies of Latin America and Spain studied through music, film, and texts from literary, economic, anthropological, and historical sources. Will examine the interaction of the Iberian Peninsula and the Hispanic worlds (16th to 18th centuries), and the formation of the new independent states (19th Century). (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA314 or SPA315.

SPA386 - Introduccion to Hispanoamerica II: Epoca Contemporanea (3 cr.)

A survey of contemporary Latin American and Spanish cultures and societies through their music, film, and television, and by means of texts from literary, economic, anthropological, and historical sources. Emphasis on current political, social, racial, and gender issues. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA385.

SPA399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Fall).

SPA410 - Advanced Spanish Writing and Oral Proficiency (3 cr.)

A review of writing and oral skills for current and future teachers of Spanish. The course prepares students to sustain and excel at the Advanced Level or higher for the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. (Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA315.

SPA440 - Topicos en estudios hispanoamericanos (3 cr.)

An in-depth examination of relevant topics in contemporary Latin America. Introduction to analytical tools and their practical applications to literature, music, film, and popular culture. (May be taken more than once with different content.) (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA385 or POI.

SPA450 - Topicos en estudios peninsulares (3 cr.)

Analysis and discussions of events or periods that have defined Spanish society such as the Civil War, Franco's government, La Nueva Ola, women in the arts, the role of cinema in creating an image of contemporary Spain. May be taken more than once with different content. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA385 or SPA386 or POI.

SPA470 - Topics in Hispanic Interdisciplinary Studies (3 cr.)

An intensive examination of selected topics in Hispanic studies from a distinctly interdisciplinary perspective. (May be taken more than once with different content.) (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SPA385 or SPA386 or POI.

SPA496 - Spanish Foreign Language Methodology (3 cr.)

This course, conducted in a seminar setting, is designed to provide future foreign language teachers with communicative and proficiency-based pedagogical strategies pertaining to middle and high school foreign language classrooms. Although intended primarily for students completing adolescence education programs in Spanish (or the BA/MST Spanish/Adolescence Education program), Spanish majors and minors meeting the prerequisite requirements may enroll. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SPA314, SPA315, SPA385, and SPA386; or 12 credits of upper-division Spanish courses, or by advisement.

SPA497 - Spanish Practicum (3 cr.)

For advanced or graduate students in Spanish who will work under faculty supervision. In addition to conducting conversation sessions, students will gain experience in planning classroom activities, preparing materials for classroom use and working within various methodologies. A contract specifying the student's responsibilities will be filed with the department chairperson. (Fall/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: by faculty invitation only, ACTFL oral proficiency rating of advanced-low or equivalent oral skills, minimum; 3.3 GPA (B+ average) in Spanish courses and 2.5 cumulative GPA.

SPA498 - Internship (3 cr.)

For advanced students of Spanish with background in education or business. Involves faculty-supervised field experiences, both on and off campus. Contract specifying student responsibilities, developed in consultation with the student, supervisor, and appropriate faculty advisor(s), will be filed in the department chairperson. Prerequisite: for advanced students of Spanish only with background in education or business; POI.

SPA499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

SPA510 - Advanced Spanish Grammar (3 cr.)

Spanish grammar for present and future teachers of Spanish or students of Spanish who are at the advanced level. The course includes structural exercises, a review of challenges of translation, and a detailed inquiry of grammar. (Summer). Liberal arts.

SPA596 - Spanish Methodology Practicum (3 cr.)

Students will learn communicative and proficiency-based pedagogical strategies in a seminar setting and by conducting conversation sessions as part of regular beginning-level Spanish courses under the close supervision of a faculty member. This course is designed for students in the MST program in Spanish and Spanish teachers seeking experience with new methodologies. Advanced undergraduates may enroll by faculty invitation only. (Summer). Prerequisites: advanced proficiencies in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.

SPA599 - Independent Study (0 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SWK101 - Introduction to the Social Work Profession (3 cr.)

This course introduces students to the profession of social work. Students will be acquainted with the purposes, structure, values, ethics, knowledge base, and practice methods of professional social work. The types of agencies employing social workers, and the client groups serviced by social workers will be examined. Through this course, students can determine their interest in pursuing a career in professional social work. (Once per year).

SWK199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SWK260 - Introduction to Social Welfare (3 cr.)

This course analyzes the history, organization and adequacy of major cash support, in-kind, and social service programs in the U.S. Particular attention is paid to the ideological, political and economic factors that have shaped their development. The emergence of social work as a profession and the role of social workers in social welfare programs are also examined. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101.

SWK299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SWK300 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3 cr.)

HBSE is a sequence of two courses that focuses on human development in the context of the social environment. Throughout the sequence, a person-in-environment perspective is utilized to interpret the situations of individuals, families and groups. These situations are evaluated in the light of social work values and ethics. The first course in the sequence focuses on the human life cycle viewed in the context of the social environment. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: BIO100 or BIO103, PSY101, SOC101, junior standing, social work majors only.

SWK302 - Generalist Practice I (3 cr.)

This is the first of three courses that prepare students for generalist professional practice. The purposes, historical roots, structure, fields of practice, values and ethics of professional social work are presented. A systems approach to persons(s)-in-environment practice with client systems of various sizes and diverse types is presented. Planned change processes used in micro, mezzo, and macro level practice are introduced and communication skills, use of consultation, and use of supervision are included. (Fall). Prerequisite: social work major.

SWK303 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment II (3 cr.)

HBSE is a sequence of two courses that focuses on human development in the context of the social environment. Throughout the sequence, a person-in-environment perspective is utilized to interpret the situations of individuals, families, and groups. These situations are evaluated in the light of social work values and ethics. The second course in the sequence pays attention to those features of culture, the political economy, families, groups, formal organizations, and communities that encourage human development or constrain and thwart it. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SWK300.

SWK304 - Social Welfare in Comparative Perspective (3 cr.)

Analysis of ways in which different societies respond to human needs and risks to human well being. Emphasizing the importance of a society's fundamental values in determining social welfare policies, programs and practices, this course compares and contrasts social welfare in the United States with that of Canada, Mexico, and other nations. International social work and the relationship between global interdependence and social work are introduced and examined. This course is both writing intensive and one in which writing is an integral/intrinsic part of the learning process. This course meets the advanced writing requirements for the Social Work Department. Approved AWR. (Spring). Prerequisites: ENG101, SWK260, social work major.

SWK305 - Cultural and Ethnic Diversity (3 cr.)

This course examines the impact of cultural and ethnic diversity in American society within the framework of social work values. Oppression, exploitation, prejudice, discrimination, and devaluation of groups based on "differences" are explored as historical and contemporary characteristics of society. Implications of cultural and ethnic diversity for the profession of social work and the practice of professional social work are emphasized. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: social work major.

SWK306 - Social Work and Mental Health (3 cr.)

This course examines the mental health system from a generalist social work perspective. Attention is given to the political, cultural and economic factors that have influenced policies, organizations and treatment approaches in the mental health field, in the U.S.A. and other countries. Requisite knowledge for effective service delivery and the roles of mental health providers are explored. (Fall). Liberal arts.

SWK307 - The Organizational Context of Social Work (3 cr.)

Examines the relationship between organizations and social work at micro, mezzo, and macro levels, with emphasis on the influence of social policy and contemporary issues. Includes attention to classical and contemporary organizational theory; structural attributes of organizations; ethical conflicts; roles of social workers, and organizational change. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: SWK260; social work major

SWK308 - Selected Topics in Social Work (3 cr.)

Analysis of a selected topic related to the needs of vulnerable populations in society, and relevant social work interventions. Liberal arts. (Fall/Spring).

SWK309 - Social Work with Groups (3 cr.)

Introduction to principles of social group work practice, theoretical foundations for understanding properties of group structure and process, and models of group work practice. Students are introduced to skills required for group assessment and effective intervention in group work practice. Students are expsed to opportunities to experience group process and to practice group work skills through a variety of classroom experiences. Emphasis is placed on the versatility of social work group practice in diverse settings. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SWK302.

SWK320 - Issues in Family Violence (3 cr.)

This course explores different types of family violence (spouse abuse, child abuse, incest, dating violence and elder abuse) with regard to the seriousness and the extent of the problem, contributing factors, relationship dynamics, and consequences for the individual, the family, the community, and the larger society. Connections between increased violence in mainstream American culture, shifts in family structures leading to family strain, and patterns of family violence are examined. The relevance of the dimension of diversity particularly religion, ethnicity, and sexual orientation to family violence and ameliorative services is considered. Causal theories and their implications for social service programs development are explored. Current social policy and social service structures are considered with regard to their effectiveness in treating and reducing family violence. (Fall or Spring). Prerequisite: SOC101.

SWK399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

SWK401 - Generalist Practice II (3 cr.)

This is the second of three courses that prepare students for generalist practice. Content focuses on the development of knowledge and skills in working with individuals, families, and treatment groups. Central to the presentation of content are the social work values of respect for the dignity and worth of every human being, venerating diversity, client empowerment and self-determination, confidentiality, and social justice. Particular emphasis is placed on approaching generalist practice with critical thinking skills. Throughout this series of courses, populations-at-risk, especially the rural poor of the North Country region are emphasized. Approved AWR. (Spring). Prerequisite: ENG101, social work majors only;SWK302.

SWK402 - Generalist Practice Methods III (3 cr.)

This is the last in a series of three courses that prepare students for generalist professional practice. Content focuses on the development of generalist practice knowledge and skills with task groups, organizations, and communities within the context of social work values. Responsibilities of professional social workers for lifelong learning and continuing professional development are examined. (Fall). Prerequisites: SWK401, senior standing.

SWK403 - Field Practicum in Social Work I (3 cr.)

This course is part I of a two-semester field practicum which provides students with the opportunity to integrate their academic learning in a practice setting under supervision of a qualified field instructor. The two-semester field practicum requires a minimum of 450 hours (225 per semester) of field practice and participation in the field orientation. Each student will complete an education plan of field practicum learning activities consistent with the field practice core competencies and practice behaviors. (Fall). Corequisite: SWK408. Prerequisites: social work majors approved for field practicum.

SWK404 - Field Practicum in Social Work II (3 cr.)

This course is part II of a two-semester field practicum which provides students with the opportunity to integrate their academic learning in a practice setting under supervision of a qualified field instructor. The second semester builds on knowledge and skills acquired in the first semester. The field practicum requires a minimum of 450 hours (225 per semester) of field practice and participation in the field orientation. Each student will complete an education plan of field practicum learning activities consistent with the field practice core competencies and practice behaviors. (Spring). Corequisite: SWK409. Prerequisites: SWK403, SWK408.

SWK405 - Research Methods in Social Work (3 cr.)

Introduction to basic research methods used in professional social work. (Spring). Prerequisites: social work major.

SWK408 - Field Practicum Seminar in Social Work I (1 cr.)

The integrative field practicum seminar is the first of a two-part sequence taken concurrently with the basic field education experience. The seminar provides students with an on-going forum in which to explore practice and professional development issues as they relate to each student's field experience. It provides an opportunity for individual and group reflection on the integration of classroom and field learning. (Fall). Corequisite: SWK403.

SWK409 - Field Practicum Seminar in Social Work II (1 cr.)

The integrative field practicum seminar is the second of a two-part sequence taken concurrently with the basic field education experience. The seminar provides students with an on-going forum in which to explore practice and professional development issues as they relate to each student's field experience. It provides an opportunity for individual and group reflection on the integration of classroom and field learning. The second seminar expands on the knowledge and skills developed in the first seminar. (Spring). Corequisite: SWK404. Prerequisites: SWK403, SWK408.

SWK460 - Social Policy (3 cr.)

This course analyzes how social welfare policies are initiated, legislated, implemented, and evaluated. The political and organizational processes that affect policy creation and implementation are examined. Attention is given to the role of social movements and interest groups in the development of social welfare policies. Special emphasis is given to the ways social policies facilitate or impede racial divisiveness, social injustice, and economic exploitation. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: SOC101, SWK260.

SWK499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall).

THE101 - Introduction to the Alexander Technique (1 to 2 cr.)

The Alexander Technique is a method for improved ease and freedom of movement, balance, support and coordination. Group and individual instruction in the principles and practice of the Alexander Technique. Designed to give students a practical introduction to the Technique with a view to applying it to both everyday tasks (e.g. walking, sitting, bending), back care, as well as more specialized activities within the disciplines of music, theatre and sports (e.g., playing a musical instrument, singing, theatre voice work, and running). (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts.

THE103 - Stage Lighting and Sound (4 cr.)

This course provides the foundational knowledge and skill sets necessary for the installation and operation of stage lighting and sound equipment. The principles of electricity and acoustics, as well as the developmental history of stage lighting and sound are also covered. (Fall).

THE104 - Stagecraft (4 cr.)

The physical mounting of a theatrical production is a process in artistic problem solving including experimentation, applications of appropriate techniques, materials and technologies. This course provides the conceptual framework and foundations for the implementation and operation of these solutions within the Art of Theatre. (Fall/Spring).

THE105 - Stage Costume (4 cr.)

This course provides the foundational knowledge and skill sets necessary for working in theatrical costume/wardrobe departments. The basics of sewing, costume design and organization, and costume history are also covered. Liberal arts. (Spring). Corequisite: THE105L.

THE106 - Introduction to Acting (3 cr.)

Exploration of the fundamentals of acting both on and off-stage, with emphasis on improvisation, theatre games, and play theory and activities. Intended to develop an awareness of the theatre's usefulness as a tool for personal discovery and communication, and to develop critical judgment of actors in performance. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

THE110 - Introduction to Theatre Art (3 cr.)

An introduction and investigation of the many aspects of theatre and how it touches the present day. Artistic, historic, sociological, aspects of this collaborative art form, as well as the practice of theatre are explored. Nature of theatre art and the arts of modern theatrical production, particularly acting, directing, and designing. Theatre as related to the other arts and to the creative and psychological needs of humanity. (Fall - Spring, Summer). Liberal arts.

THE115 - Musical Theatre (3 cr.)

Refer to MUS115 course description. (Fall). Liberal arts.

THE190 - Production Laboratory (1 cr.)

An introductory tutorial designed to give students hands on experience in the methods of theatrical production. Work may be done in any or all of the theatrical departments: set, lights, props, sound, costumes, projections and maintenance. May be repeated twice. (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall).

THE193 - Stage Lighting and Sound Lab (1 cr.)

This course applies the foundational knowledge and skill sets necessary for the installation and operation of stage lighting and sound equipment. The principles of electricity and acoustics, as well as the developmental history of stage lighting and sound are also covered. (Fall).

THE195 - Stage Costume Lab (1 cr.)

The physical mounting of a theatrical production is a process in artistic problem solving including experimentation, applications of appropriate techniques, materials and technologies. This course provides practice of foundations for the implementation within Wardrobe/Costuming. (Spring).

THE199 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean.

THE205 - Creative Dramatics/Improvisation (3 cr.)

Principles and practices involved in the construction of improvised drama. Theatre games, improvisation and group process techniques are explored in a workshop setting. Students form an ensemble for informal performances. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE106.

THE206 - Acting With the Voice (3 cr.)

Concentrated attention on the voice as the crucial tool in the actor's apparatus. Preparation and presentation of monologues and duologues in both verse and prose, techniques of sight reading and reader's theatre, culminating in public performance. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE106.

THE209 - Production Leadership (3 cr.)

This course trains students to understand how to work as a Stage Manager, a Production Manager, a Crew Chief, and as other leadership oriented production positions. Students will learn how to remain organized, maintain control, and work through management issues that arise while working on theatre productions. Liberal arts. (Every Other Fall).

THE217 - Movement Study (3 cr.)

A study course which promotes an understanding of the art dance and movement in the Performing Arts that touches experiences cultural, historical, and social in content. This course is an exploration of the creative process through movement, dance, and all forms of dance. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

THE221 - Script Analysis (3 cr.)

Introduces students to methods of script analysis, or "how to read a play." Analysis will focus on dramatic structure, content, and meaning from a theatrical point of view in preparation for production. Methods of analysis will be discussed and applied to representative play scripts. Extensive writing will be required. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

THE240 - Drafting and Rendering for Theatre (3 cr.)

This course is an opportunity to learn and create the many visual aspects of scenic, lighting, and costume design, including computer drafting or CAD programming. The students will learn various process and finishing art techniques. Students will also learn how to use technology to create other documents used in theatrical industries. (Fall). Prerequisites: sophomore standing or POI..

THE245 - American Drama (3 cr.)

Selected American plays of the 19th and 20th centuries including major figures (O'Neill, Williams, Miller), experimental theatre movements, contemporary playwriting, and the musical theatre. (Fall). Liberal arts.

THE250 - Canadian Theatre (3 cr.)

A survey of the development of Canadian and First Nations theatre with emphasis on historical texts as well as representative plays reflecting the multiple perspectives and backgrounds that have shaped the development of a national Canadian Theatre tradition. Field trips. Liberal arts. Prerequisites: sophomore standing

THE265 - Acting I (3 cr.)

Realistic plays serve as reference for the investigation of major styles from world theatre in terms of theatrical conventions, structure of language, and social, political and moral attitudes of the play presenting the playwright and his/her time. Play reading, script in hand staging and theatre games will supplement reading, writing and performance. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE106 or POI.

THE299 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Summer).

THE300 - Theatre History I (3 cr.)

A survey of western theatre history from the Ancient Greece to French Neoclassical Theatre. Topics include the development of the physical theatre, dramaturgy, directing, design, acting, non-western dramatic forms and alternative theatre forms. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

THE301 - Theatre History II (3 cr.)

A survey of western theatre history from 1550 to present. Topics include the development of the physical theatre, dramaturgy, directing, design, acting, non-western dramatic forms and alternative theatre forms. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE300, ENG101.

THE305 - Production Workshop (1 to 4 cr.)

Production workshop focuses on student-centered learning, ensemble work, collaborative devising, script analysis, development of performance techniques, application of craft, and critical/creative thinking as part of the artistic process. Liberal arts. (Every Year). Prerequisite: POI.

THE308 - Theatrical Makeup (3 cr.)

This workshop course teaches how to develop theatre characters through the application of naturalistic and theatrical makeup. The students will also learn and practice advanced makeup special effects, and wig/hair styling and maintenance. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: THE106.

THE311 - Performance and the Spectator (3 cr.)

An exploration and study of the relationship between the spectator and the performer. Topics of study include classic works of dramatic and performance theory from Aristotle to Graham. (Spring). Liberal arts.

THE313 - World Puppetry (3 cr.)

This course examines puppetry from a worldwide perspective in order to gain an understanding of the history and art of puppets in performance. Through this understanding students can enhance their appreciation of world cultures and the impact of puppets on modern theatre and film. Students will also design and create their own puppets inspired by folk traditions as a means to finding their own expressionistic voice. (every other year). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE100 or THE104 or THE106 or THE217.

THE317 - Dance and the Creative Process (3 cr.)

Creative expression through dance, music and movement. Students will choreograph and perform works based upon their development of style and technique. Exploration of the historic and cultural connection between dance and expression. The course will culminate in a performance of student works. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE217.

THE318 - Playwriting (3 cr.)

Workshop-environment experience in writing for the stage. Scrutiny of the techniques involved in plot, characterization, dialogue and stage technique. Development of monologues, two-character sketches and extended scripts. Approved AWR. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

THE320 - Topics in Theatre (1 to 3 cr.)

Particular topics in theatre or the allied arts offered for one to three credit hours depending on the topic and the number of class meetings. May be elected more than once if the topic is different. (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall). Liberal arts.

THE340 - Visual Styles n Theatre (3 cr.)

An investigation of the historic styles of art, architecture, furniture, material objects and clothing from the point of view of designers for the stage. Also surveyed are the historic styles of stage design, forms of scenery and theatres. Students present visual research as either photo copies, drawings, props, photographs or models. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: THE110.

THE365 - Acting II (3 cr.)

The actor's task stressing skills of analysis including: given circumstances, objective, obstacle, tactics, and physicalization. Activities include the memorization and presentation of scenes and monologues for group critique. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: THE106.

THE390 - Practicum in Theatre: Aspects of Theatrical Production (1 cr.)

Participation in a variety of theatre activities; emphasis: practical theatre experience. Course may be elected more than once to a maximum of six credit hours when activity is substantially different. (Winter, Spring, Summer, Fall).

THE395 - Junior Seminar (1 cr.)

Provides the student with an opportunity to focus their theatrical interests and skills in preparation for their final academic year and eventual career goals. Course content will include resume preparation, portfolio presentation and job search skills. (Spring). Prerequisites: theatre major, minor or concentration in elementary education status.

THE398 - Improvisation Group (1 cr.)

Intensive work in the development of improvisation skills for performance and for the adaptation, development and public performance of new theatre pieces. Theatre games in the tradition of Viola Spolin and Keith Johnstone are the basis of the training. Ensemble and individual work performed for live audiences. May be taken twice with POI. (Spring, Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: by audition only.

THE399 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

THE401 - Topics: Theatre Art (3 cr.)

Advanced studies on theatre and performance. Studies theories, playwrights, dramaturgy, and other practices of the theatre arts. This course may be elected twice when the content is substantially different. (Fall/Winter/Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, or POI.

THE416 - Directing the Play (3 cr.)

Theory and practice of theatre direction. The production process, both amateur and professional, from play selection through rehearsal to performance. (Fall). Prerequisites: THE106, THE110.

THE419L - Styles of Acting Lab (0 cr.)

(Spring).

THE440 - Production Design (3 cr.)

This course develops the skills of design conceptualization and visualization in the design/directing process. Students will develop their skills of researching and refining visual imagery, script analysis from the designer's perspective, presenting visual materials to a production team, various rendering and drawing techniques, conceptual design thinking, and compiling design archives. The course will also examine historic and current designers and their styles. Students are expected to produce portfolio and production worthy projects. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE240 or POI.

THE456 - Modern Drama: 1880-1925 (3 cr.)

British and continental drama from the height of the Victorian era; through Ibsen and the coming of realism; the emergence of expressionism in the war years; and the progression to the avant-garde of the 1920s. (Fall). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: ENG101 and either THE110 or ENG195, or POI.

THE457 - World Drama Since 1925 (3 cr.)

British and continental drama focusing on such phenomena as epic theatre the absurdists, theatre of cruelty, agit-prop drama and multimedia experiments. Playwrights studied: Brecht, Durrenmatt, Beckett, Genet, and Weiss. (Spring). Liberal arts.

THE465 - Acting III (3 cr.)

An advanced studio course in the technique and process of performing the scripted character. The student will develop specific tools for script analysis and characterization as well as enhanced understanding of the vocabulary, conceptual framework, and artistic ethic which is realized in the performance. (Spring). Liberal arts. Prerequisites: THE106 or POI.

THE480 - The Stratford Experience (1 cr.)

Students will study Shakespeare, the history of the Stratford Festival, and travel to Stratford, Ontario to watch the Stratford Shakespeare Festival's performances of his plays. (Fall/Spring/Summer). Liberal arts. Prerequisite: ENG101.

THE490 - Senior Project (1 cr.)

Theatre experiences and knowledge gained by students are connected through compilation of resume and portfolio. Students will meet with faculty jury to discuss their bodies of theatrical work. Required for senior theatre students. Liberal arts.(Spring/Fall). Prerequisites: senior class standing.

THE496 - Teaching Practicum (1 to 3 cr.)

Assist instructor in planning, preparation, class discussions and teaching in undergraduate sections of appropriate theatre or tutoring courses. May not be taken more than once. Liberal Arts. Prerequisites: senior standing, theatre major, permission of supervising instructor and the chairperson.

THE498 - Internship in Performing Arts (1 to 15 cr.)

A student designed, interdisciplinary approach to explore several problems involved in the performing arts of theatre. Acting, musical theatre, singing, dance, directing, scene and lighting design, costume and makeup design, technical production, and arts management are examples to be explored. The internship may be designed around a studio performance and production problem not normally covered in regularly scheduled courses, culminating in a performing event. (Spring, Summer, Fall). Prerequisites: upper-level standing, admission by application with resume, interview, audition and proposal.

THE499 - Independent Study (1 to 15 cr.)

Project individually arranged by student and faculty sponsor. Requires completion of the Independent Study form and approval by the Faculty Sponsor, Academic Advisor, Department Chair and Academic Dean. (Spring, Fall).

TTR101 - Tutor Training Seminar (1 to 3 cr.)

An overview of the theory and practice of peer tutors in higher education is the required training component for all content tutors at the Claude J. Clark Learning Center. Through role playing, small group activities and group discussion, students will develop the necessary skills to tutor in a diverse campus community. Prospective tutors must be recommended by faculty member(s) in the course(s) they wish to tutor. (Spring, Fall). Prerequisites: sophomore standing, 2.75 GPA.

Search the College Course Catalog

Enter a course number or three-letter course subject to search the College Catalog:

Alphabetical Listing of Curriculum Descriptions by Course Subject

A

  • Africana Studies = AAS
  • Accounting = ACC
  • Anthropology = ANT
  • Arabic = ARA
  • Art = ART
  • Asian Studies = ASI
  • Astronomy = AST

B

  • Biology = BIO
  • Business = BUS

C

  • Canadian Studies = CAS
  • Communications Disorders & Sciences = CDS
  • Consumer Economics Management = CEM
  • Chemistry = CHE
  • Counseling = CLG
  • Career Life Planning = CLP
  • Communication Studies = CMM
  • Computer Science = CSC
  • Criminal Justice = CRI

E

  • Economics = ECO
  • Education = EDU
  • Education - Administration = EDA
  • Education - Mathematics = EDM
  • Education - Reading = EDR
  • Education - Special = EDS
  • English = ENG
  • Environmental Science = ENV
  • English as a Second Language = ESL
  • Expeditionary Studies = EXP

F

  • Finance = FIN
  • Foreign Languages & Literature = FLL
  • French = FRE
  • Freshman Seminar = FRS
  • Freshman Experience = FRX

G

  • Geography = GEG
  • Gender & Women's Studies = GWS
  • Geology = GEL
  • German = GER

H

  • Health Education = HED
  • History = HIS
  • Honors = HON
  • Hotel, Restaurant, & Tourism Management = HRT
  • Human Development and Family Relations = HDF

I

  • Interdisciplinary Studies = INT
  • Italian = ITA

J

  • Journalism = JOU

L

  • Latin American Studies = LAS
  • Latin = LAT
  • Leadership = MLS
  • Library Skills = LIB
  • Language & Linguistics = LIN

M

  • Mathematics = MAT
  • Meteorology = MET
  • Military Studies = MTS
  • Management & International Business = MGM
  • Marketing & Entrepreneurship = MKE
  • Minority Studies = MNS
  • Music = MUS

N

  • Nursing = NUR
  • Nutrition = FNI

P

  • Physical Education = PED
  • Philosophy = PHI
  • Physics = PHY
  • Portuguese = POR
  • Political Science = PSC
  • Psychology = PSY

R

  • Reading = RDG
  • Recreation = REC
  • Russian = RUS

S

  • Science & Society = SCI
  • Sociology = SOC
  • Spanish = SPA
  • Social Work = SWK

T

  • Theatre = THE
  • Tutor Training = TTR