General Education 5 Plan

  1. REVISION FOR INTERIM GE5 PROGRAM April 4, 2012
  2.  
  3. General Education Plan*
  4. SUNY Plattsburgh
  5. Adopted by the Faculty Senate November 12, 2002
  6. Approved by the President November 22, 2002
  7.  
  8. Revised by the Faculty Senate December 9, 2003
  9. Approved by the President January 9, 2004
  10. Revised by the Faculty Senate March 7, 2006
  11. Approved by the President March 14, 2006
  12.  
  13. Revised by the Faculty Senate October 2, 2007
  14. Approved by the President November 5, 2007
  15.  
  16. Minor Revision Approved by the Faculty Senate Executive Committee
  17. October 23, 2007
  18.  
  19. Revised for GE5 by the Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
  20. April 4, 2012
  21. _____________________________________
  22. James Liszka, Ph.D
  23. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs
  24.  
  25.  
  26. *General Education Program(s) Covered by this Interim Revision of the Plan
  27.  
  28. In January of 2011 the College adopted an interim General Education Program (GE5). The new
  29. program was created by the Deans’ Cabinet and Provost/VPAA and approved by the President.
  30. The General Education Plan herein has been revised by the Provost/VPAA to be consistent with
  31. the interim GE5 program. The Faculty Senate has not voted on this revision.
  32.  
  33. The Purpose of General Education
  34.  
  35. The General Education Program at Plattsburgh State is designed to prepare students for life in
  36. and beyond college, by providing the basic knowledge and skills necessary for a successful
  37. education and a satisfying professional and personal life.
  38.  
  39. The Objectives
  40.  
  41. The following objectives reflect the requisite foundation of skills and knowledge needed to
  42. succeed in the twenty-first century, whatever one’s disciplinary specialization.
  43.  
  44. A Plattsburgh graduate should have an understanding and appreciation of:
  45. · the complexity of the world in which we live
  46. · the arts and aesthetics
  47. · the sciences and mathematics
  48. · the “great ideas” of humanity
  49. · the cultures of the world
  50. · the nature of society
  51. · the moral responsibilities of the individual
  52. · the continuity of history and the changes influenced by historical processes
  53.  
  54. These objectives require knowledge of the basic subject areas and their interconnections. This
  55. is fundamental to success in a world where complex ideas increasingly affect daily living. A
  56. fuller understanding of the social sciences, the arts and humanities, the natural sciences, and
  57. technology allows an individual to make informed decisions about issues and problems faced in
  58. professional and personal life. Successful professional and personal life also requires the ability
  59. to work productively with individuals and groups from a variety of backgrounds and to practice
  60. ethical behavior. An awareness of one's own and other cultures, ability to communicate in one's
  61. own and a second language, and a foundation inethical and reflective decision-making enrich all
  62. aspects of life.
  63.  
  64. Additionally, the Plattsburgh graduate should have the following abilities or skills:
  65.  
  66. · ability to read with comprehension
  67. · ability to apply quantitative skills
  68. · ability to communicate effectively in written and spoken English (or other language of
  69. instruction)
  70. · ability to communicate in a second language
  71. · ability to use technology effectively
  72. · ability to filter, analyze and critique information and experience
  73.  
  74. Writing, speaking and critical thinking are necessary for the formulation and communication of
  75. knowledge and reasoned opinions. Finding useful and reliable information to enhance
  76. knowledge and upon which to base opinions is critical in a time of rapidly growing access to
  77. information, as is the ability to manage that information with a variety of technologies.
  78. Understanding basic mathematical operations is preparation for both financial management and
  79. critical analysis of statistical data that justifies social, political and personal decisions.
  80.  
  81.  
  82. Assumptions
  83.  
  84. The program outline below is based on several assumptions:
  85.  
  86. 1. that students will enter SUNY Plattsburgh with competencies
  87. · in foreign language equal to FL 111,
  88. · in English composition equal to ENG 100, and
  89. · in mathematics equal to MAT 101.
  90. Students who do not have these competencies when they enter SUNY Plattsburgh will achieve them before
  91. completing the related parts of their general education program.
  92.  
  93. 2. that a writing-across-the-curriculum requirement at SUNY Plattsburgh will continue to exist;
  94.  
  95. 3. that any semester-long, approved, and satisfactorily completed study abroad course of study
  96. will satisfy the 3-credit Integration component (Global Issues);
  97.  
  98. 4. that an assessment program will be developed, and will include required participation of
  99. upper division students as part of the Global Issues course;
  100.  
  101. 5. that a significant faculty development program will be initiated and maintained to reinforce
  102. this general education program;
  103.  
  104. 6. that the standing committee on general education will continue to provide oversight; and
  105.  
  106. 7. that the college will continue to support experiential education opportunities including
  107. service learning.
  108.  
  109. Learning Communities
  110.  
  111. The General Education Committee will entertain proposals for specially designed
  112. thematic Learning Communities that embed learning skills or subject matter across the
  113. curriculum, thereby allowing students to satisfy General Education requirements or
  114. learning outcomes objectives in a coordinated academic environment. In some cases
  115. students in Learning Communities will be able to demonstrate proficiency in SUNY
  116. Required Learning Outcomes and/or SUNY Plattsburgh General Education Requirements based on the
  117. synergistic effect of all the courses in the Learning Community. Transcripts of such
  118. studentswill show a proficiency designation but no additional credit for the category
  119. satisfied. Portfolios or other alternate means of demonstrating proficiency in a general
  120. education outcome or requirement might also be produced in conjunction with credit
  121. bearing integrative seminars or tutorials.
  122.  
  123. Design of Learning Communities:
  124. 1. Each Learning Community will consist of at least three courses taken simultaneously
  125. by the same group of students.
  126. 2. Enrollments cannot exceed 25 students per section.
  127. 3. Learning Communities may include beyond the basic three courses a larger core
  128. course taken in common or an integrative seminar or reflective tutorial of from one to
  129. four credits. If a large class is added, its syllabus must be integrated with the Learning
  130. Community; simply attaching a large class without coordination is not acceptable.
  131. 4. All Learning Communities are expected to satisfy the SUNY Required Learning
  132. Outcomes for oral communication.
  133. 5. Learning Communities may include a service-learning component.
  134.  
  135. Special courses: The General Education Committee will consider for approval for General
  136. Education credit courses that will only be offered as part of Learning Communities. Therefore,
  137. the General Education Program can contain courses that will not be offered except as part of
  138. Learning Communities. These will include courses, seminars or tutorials that help students
  139. integrate Learning Community material as wellas other special offerings that depend on the
  140. cumulative effect of a particular cluster of courses.
  141.  
  142. Approval: Learning Communities that offer alternative routes to satisfying general education
  143. requirements need to be approved by the General Education Committee.
  144.  
  145.  
  146. The Program
  147.  
  148. The General Education Program will strengthen students’ skills and abilities and expand their
  149. appreciation and understanding in all the areas listed in the objectives above. In completing the
  150. program, students will also meet all the SUNY System requirements for general education.
  151.  
  152. The General Education Program GE5 ( 33-34 credits plus 0-10 credits in prerequisites) includes
  153. the following elements:
  154.  
  155. A. The Skills Requirements (6-12 credits plus 0-7 credits to meet prerequisites)
  156.  
  157. 1. Mathematics (3-4 credits plus 0-4 credits of MAT101 to meet prerequisite) — Courses in this
  158. category introduce students to mathematical thinking and logic and foster students’ ability “to
  159. interpret and draw inferences from mathematical models such as formulas, graphs, tables, and
  160. schematics,” “to represent mathematical information symbolically, visually, numerically and
  161. verbally,” “to employ quantitative methods such as arithemetic, algebra, geometry, or statistics
  162. to solve problems,” “to estimate and check mathematical results for reasonableness,” and “to
  163. recognize the limits of mathematical and statistical methods” (SUNY Required Learning
  164. Outcomes). Courses will emphasize the applicability of mathematics to “real life” and will be
  165. designed to instill in all students a sense of mathematics as a creative and useful endeavor.
  166. Courses focus on developing in the student an understanding and appreciation of mathematics
  167. and the great ideas of humanity and reinforce the students’ ability to apply quantitative skills,
  168. and to filter, analyze and critique information and experiences (Plattsburgh General Education
  169. Objectives).
  170. 2. Oral Expression (0-3 credits) — Specially designated oral expression courses assist students
  171. to “develop [college-level] proficiency in oral discourse[, and to] evaluate an oral presentation
  172. according to established criteria” (SUNY Required Learning Outcomes); and communicate
  173. effectively in spoken English or other language of instruction (Plattsburgh General Education
  174. Objectives). (Students must take among their courses at least one that is designated as an oral
  175. expression course.)
  176.  
  177. 3. Information and Technology Literacy (0-1 credits) — Courses in this category will ensure
  178. that students have mastered the skills and concepts basic to information and technology
  179. literacy. Students will demonstrate the ability to “perform the basic operations of personal
  180. computer use; understand and use basic research techniques; and locate, evaluate and
  181. synthesize information from a variety of sources” (SUNY Required Learning Outcomes).
  182. Courses in this category will focus on the ability to use technology effectively and the ability
  183. to filter, analyze, and critique information and experience (Plattsburgh General Education
  184. Objectives).
  185.  
  186. 4. Written Expression (3-4 credits plus 0-4 credits of ENG100 to meet prerequisite) — Courses
  187. in this category develop in students the ability to “produce coherent texts within common
  188. college level written forms; . . . revise and improve such texts; . . . develop an argument [,
  189. based on evidence], and organize supporting details” (SUNY Required Learning Outcomes);
  190. and communicate effectively in written English (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives).
  191. Courses provide extensive practice in writing and revision in order to help students develop
  192. the ability to write clear, effective English prose.
  193.  
  194. B. The Knowledge and Understanding Requirements (12-16 credits plus 0-3 credits to
  195. meet prerequisites)
  196.  
  197. 5. Natural Science and Technology (3-4 credits) — Courses in this category develop in students
  198. “understanding of the methods scientists use to explore natural phenomena, including
  199. observation, hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation,
  200. evaluation of evidence, and employment of mathematical analysis: and application of
  201. scientific data, concepts, and models in one of the natural sciences” (SUNY Required
  202. Learning Outcomes). Courses will explore the fundamental assumptions and principles of
  203. the scientific method,illustrated by laboratory and/or fieldwork. Courses will make clear the
  204. difference between science and technology and enable students to critically assess
  205. technological worth. Courses will strengthen students’ skills in qualitative and quantitative
  206. reasoning and in critical thinking and analysis, by careful study of both historic and
  207. contemporary scientific problems. In addition, courses will reinforce students’
  208. understanding and appreciation of the sciences and their ability to use technology effectively
  209. (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives).
  210.  
  211. 6. Social Sciences (3 credits) — Courses in this category provide students with “understanding
  212. of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, including observation,
  213. hypothesis development, measurement and data collection, experimentation, evaluation of
  214. evidence, and employment of mathematical and interpretive analysis; and knowledge of
  215. major concepts and issues of at least one discipline in the social sciences” (SUNY Required
  216. Learning Outcomes). Courses focus on developing in students an understanding and
  217. appreciation of the complexity of our world, the great ideas and cultures of the world, the
  218. nature of society, and the moral responsibility of the individual (Plattsburgh General
  219. Education Objectives). Courses reinforce the students’ ability to read with comprehension,
  220. to communicate effectively in written and spoken English, to use technology effectively,
  221. (while also assessing the impact of technological innovation), and to filter, analyze and
  222. critique information and experiences (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives).
  223.  
  224.  
  225.  
  226. 7. U.S. Civilization OR Western Civilization (3 credits)
  227.  
  228. a. U.S. Civilization (3 credits from U.S. Civilization OR Western Civilization) - Courses in
  229. the U.S. Civilization category expand students’ “understanding of common institutions in
  230. American society and how they have affected different groups” and their “understanding of
  231. America’s evolving relationship with the rest of the world.” Students must also demonstrate
  232. “knowledge of a basic narrative of American history: political, economic, social, and
  233. cultural, including knowledge of unity and diversity in American society” (SUNY Required
  234. Learning Outcomes). Courses will include aboriginal concerns, immigration, inequality,
  235. growth, colonialism, the environment, and issues of power and conflict, especially in a North
  236. American context. Courses focus on developing in students an understanding and
  237. appreciation of the complexity of our world, the nature of society, the moral responsibility of
  238. the individual, and the continuity of history and the changes influenced by historical
  239. processes (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives). Courses reinforce the students’
  240. ability to read with comprehension, to communicate effectively in written and spoken
  241. English, and to filter, analyze and critique information and experiences (Plattsburgh General
  242. Education Objectives). (SUNY Category: American History).
  243.  
  244. b. Western Civilization (3 credits from U.S. Civilization OR Western Civilization) —
  245. Courses in the Western Civilization category impart “knowledge of the development of the
  246. distinctive features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc. of Western
  247. civilization” and “relate the development of Western civilization to that of other regions of
  248. the world” (SUNY Required Learning Outcomes). Courses will include attention to such
  249. matters as emigration and immigration, art, music, philosophy, literature, religion and
  250. conflict. Courses focus on developing in students an understanding and appreciation of the
  251. complexity of our world, the great ideas and cultures of the world, the nature of society, the
  252. moral responsibility of the individual, and the continuity of history and the changes
  253. influenced by historical processes (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives). Courses
  254. reinforce the students’ ability to read with comprehension, to communicate effectively in
  255. written and spoken English, and to filter, analyze and critique information and experiences
  256. (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives).
  257.  
  258. 8. World Systems OR Foreign Language (3 credits)
  259.  
  260. a. World Systems (3 credits from World Systems OR Foreign Language) — Courses in this
  261. category impart “knowledge of either a broad outline of world history, or the distinctive
  262. features of the history, institutions, economy, society, culture, etc. of one non-Western
  263. civilization” (SUNY Required Learning Outcomes). Courses focus on developing in
  264. students an understanding and appreciation of the complexity of our world, the great ideas
  265. and cultures of the world, the nature of society, the moral responsibility of the individual,
  266. and the continuity of history and the changes influenced by historical processes (Plattsburgh
  267. General Education Objectives). Courses reinforce the students’ ability to read with
  268. comprehension, to communicate effectively in written and spoken English, and to filter,
  269. analyze and critique information and experiences (Plattsburgh General Education
  270. Objectives). (SUNY Category: Other World Civilizations)
  271.  
  272. b. Foreign Language (3 credits from World Systems OR Foreign Language. If the Foreign
  273. Language category is chosen, student must complete 0-3 credits of second level foreign
  274. language plus 0-3 credits of first level foreign language to meet prerequisite) – Foreign
  275. Language courses build upon the basic skills required by SUNY (“basic proficiency in the
  276. understanding and use of a foreign language, and knowledge of the distinctive features of
  277. culture(s) associated with the language they are studying”). Courses focus on developing in
  278. students an understanding and appreciation of the complexity of our world and
  279. understanding and appreciation of the cultures of the world (Plattsburgh General Education
  280. Objectives). Courses develop the students’ ability to communicate in a second language
  281. (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives).
  282.  
  283. First level foreign language courses approved by SUNY (see college catalog for list) count
  284. toward the minimum 30 credits of SUNY-approved General Education credits (see category
  285. C below) although by themselves they do not satisfy the requirement of a second level
  286. foreign language course if the Foreign Language category is chosen.
  287.  
  288. 9. Humanities OR The Arts (3 credits)
  289.  
  290. a. Humanities (3 credits from Humanities OR the Arts) — Courses in the Humanities
  291. category provide students with “knowledge of the conventions and methods of at least one of
  292. the humanities” (SUNY Required Learning Outcomes). Courses focus on developing in
  293. students an understanding and appreciation of the complexity of our world, aesthetics, the
  294. great ideas and cultures of the world, and the moral responsibilities of the individual
  295. (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives). Courses reinforce students’ ability to read with
  296. comprehension, to communicate effectively in written and spoken English, and to filter,
  297. analyze, and critique information and experiences (Plattsburgh General Education
  298. Objectives).
  299.  
  300. b. The Arts (3 credits from Humanities OR The Arts) — Courses in The Arts category
  301. provide students with “understanding of at least one principal art form and the creative
  302. process inherent therein” (SUNY Required Learning Outcomes). Courses focus on
  303. developing in students an understanding and appreciation of the complexity of our world, the
  304. arts and aesthetics, the great ideas and cultures of the world, and the moral responsibilities of
  305. the individual (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives). Courses reinforce students’
  306. ability to communicate effectively and to filter, analyze and critique information and
  307. experience (Plattsburgh General Education Objectives).
  308.  
  309. C. Additional Approved General Education Courses (2-12 credits)
  310.  
  311. To satisfy the requirements of category C, students must complete additional SUNY-
  312. approved courses from categories A and/or B above to bring total General Education course
  313. credits for sections A, B, and C to a minimum of 30.
  314. Credits received in the Information and Technology Literacy category do not count
  315. toward the minimum 30 credits of SUNY-approved General Education courses.
  316. First level foreign language courses approved by SUNY (see college catalog for list)
  317. count toward the minimum 30 credits of SUNY-approved General Education credits in
  318. category C although by themselves they do not satisfy the requirement of a second level
  319. foreign language course if the Foreign Language category is chosen.
  320.  
  321.  
  322. The Integration Requirement
  323.  
  324. 10. Global Issues (3 credits) — Courses in this area encourage students to think
  325. transnationally or transculturally about social, political, economic, aesthetic, moral, and
  326. technological issues. These courses will contribute to students’ understanding about issues
  327. such as human rights, migration, trade, poverty, access to health care, and technology, and
  328. the ramifications of policies regarding political power, militarization, and the environment.
  329. A course offered in this area will engage in comparative studies of a global theme across
  330. different nations, cultural groups, or cultural regions. Courses in this area will be upper
  331. division (300 or 400 level) and will build on and integrate the knowledge and skills acquired
  332. in the first two sections of the program.
  333.  
  334.  
  335. Policies and Procedures for Implementing the General Education Program
  336.  
  337. A. Common Goals Expressed in Common Formats
  338.  
  339. 1. To be approved for general education credit in the skills and knowledge and
  340. understanding components, a course must be specifically designed for a general
  341. education audience; courses in the upper-division integration component (Global
  342. Issues) must demonstrate appropriateness for a general education audience.
  343.  
  344. 2. General education courses will:
  345. a. reinforce oral and written communication skills;
  346. b. integrate critical thinking and information literacy/management competencies
  347. into the curriculum;
  348. c. reflect diversity of content and scholarship and offer a broad focus;
  349. d. engage students in critical reflection on issues of race, gender, and class
  350. appropriate to content;
  351. e. include regional or local content where appropriate;
  352. f. include international content where appropriate;
  353. g. include technology appropriate to the discipline; and
  354. h. include an ethics component.
  355.  
  356. 3. To be approved, General Education courses must show how they meet the overall
  357. goals of General Education, and how they address the objectives of the particular
  358. category they serve.
  359.  
  360. 4. Course proposals for the General Education curriculum must follow the common
  361. format devised by the General Education Committee.
  362.  
  363. 5. By college policy, instructors of General Education courses must include in their
  364. course syllabi the General Education Student Learning Outcomes of the category or
  365. categories for which the course has been approved for General Education (Faculty
  366. Senate Action #747, October 2011).
  367.  
  368. B. Quality and Pedagogy
  369.  
  370. In order to assure engagement of students in learning and high standards of quality,
  371. courses approved for the General Education Program must demonstrate principles of
  372. good practice in undergraduate education, such as:
  373.  
  374. 1. Communicating High Expectations and Course Standards: Course proposals must
  375. describe how high expectations and standards shall be communicated to students: a)
  376. Course descriptions must indicate what level of skills and knowledge are required for
  377. the course. b) Course descriptions must indicate how course materials and texts meet
  378. the objectives of the category. c) Efforts must be made to acquaint students with
  379. issues and materials relating to the topics addressed. d) Course requirements should
  380. ensure that students spend adequate time on assignments that should be evaluated
  381. frequently and promptly. e) Types and frequency of assignments should be listed in
  382. the courses proposed for General Education.
  383.  
  384. 2. Fostering Active Learning: To be approved, course proposals for General Education
  385. are expected to show how students can be actively engaged in learning. Students
  386. should be encouraged to talk and write about what they are learning and apply it.
  387. Some examples of active learning approaches include class discussions, study
  388. groups, structured exercises, peer critiques, in-class writing and team projects.
  389.  
  390. 3. Reinforcing and Integrating Skills and Content: Course proposals for General
  391. Education must demonstrate how the course will reinforce the goals of the program
  392. (outlined above), integrate appropriate skills and content components of course, and
  393. contribute to integration within the General Education Program.
  394.  
  395. C. Faculty Involvement and Recognition: Collective Setting and Maintenance of
  396. Standards
  397.  
  398. 1. To make the above effective there needs to be dialogue among people teaching in
  399. general education, within the categories and across all of them. The General
  400. Education Committee shall sponsor periodic workshops on reinforcing skills and
  401. sharing course outlines, teaching methods, and new course materials.
  402.  
  403. 2. Under the sponsorship of the General Education Committee, faculty teaching in the
  404. several categories should form sub-groups for the collective development,
  405. maintenance and evaluation of goals and standards of the category (including the
  406. assessment of student learning outcomes). Meetings for such a purpose will be
  407. convened at least once a year.
  408.  
  409. 3. The institution must provide recognition for teaching in general education and
  410. support the development of an esprit de corps of the faculty teaching in general
  411. education. Teaching in general education should be recognized in faculty evaluation.
  412.  
  413.  
  414. D. Review and Evaluation
  415.  
  416. The General Education Committee shall be responsible for the assessment of student
  417. learning outcomes and the review and evaluation of the General Education curricula and
  418. program. The committee shall communicate its findings to the Vice President for
  419. Academic Affairs and to the Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate.
  420.  
  421. 1. The General Education Committee will review all courses for approval and re-
  422. approval into the curriculum on a six-year rotating cycle.
  423.  
  424. 2. The General Education Committee will develop, oversee the implementation of, and
  425. periodically review a learning outcomes assessment plan for general education.
  426. Assessment of the general education program will be focused on program objectives
  427. and will be embedded in general education courses.
  428.  
  429. 3. The General Education Committee will conduct a periodic evaluation of the General
  430. Education Program, including effectiveness of curricular structure and impact on
  431. student learning.
  432.  
  433. E. Standing Committee on General Education
  434.  
  435. The General Education Committee is a standing committee of the Faculty Senate. The
  436. membership and responsibilities are specified in the faculty by-laws, Article 2.10, as
  437. follows:
  438.  
  439. 2.10.1 MEMBERSHIP: This committee shall consist of a Chair (Article 2.6.5), twelve
  440. Faculty members appointed by the Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate
  441. (Article 2.6.3), one student member appointed by the Student Association, and
  442. one ex-officio non-voting member (the chief academic officer); all members of
  443. the committee, with the exception of the chairperson and student member (to
  444. be elected in January) who will serve for one-year terms, shall be appointed for
  445. three years.
  446.  
  447. 2.10.2 RESPONSIBILITIES: This committee shall be responsible for leadership in
  448. developing the General Education curriculum, for implementing policies,
  449. monitoring the administration of the General Education curriculum and
  450. recommending policies on General Education in order to realize the goals and
  451. objectives of the program. The committee shall supervise the formation of
  452. subgroups of faculty offering courses within the same component of the
  453. General Education Program to monitor and report on the effectiveness of each
  454. category of the curriculum. The committee shall have access to the resources
  455. of the Chief Academic Officer’s office for support of its work. The specific
  456. responsibilities is as follows:
  457.  
  458. 2.10.2.1 Formulating and distributing procedures to be followed in receiving and acting
  459. upon proposed courses.
  460.  
  461. 2.10.2.2 Sponsoring or soliciting and selecting courses suitable for meeting the
  462. guidelines of the General Education Program.
  463.  
  464. 2.10.2.3 Designating courses that may be taken to fulfill general education requirements.
  465.  
  466. 2.10.2.4 Coordinating the development of courses suitable for satisfying the general
  467. education requirements.
  468.  
  469. 2.10.2.5 Recommending modifications in the general education requirements to
  470. accommodate transfer and advance standing students.
  471.  
  472. 2.10.2.6 Conducting a periodic evaluation of the General Education Program.
  473.  
  474. 2.10.2.7 Making recommendations to the Senate Executive Committee for significant
  475. revisions and changes in the General Education Program such as the addition or
  476. deletion of components, or a change in the credit hour requirements.
  477.  
  478. 2.10.2.8 Consulting, when necessary, with the Standing Committee on Resources and
  479. Planning to insure the availability of needed resources to staff, fund and support
  480. general education experiences.
  481.  
  482. 2.10.2.9 Issuing a report each semester of all curricular actions for the information of all
  483. faculty advisors.
  484.  

Contact Information

For more information about the general education program at SUNY Plattsburgh, please contact:

Academic Affairs
Stephen Light, Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs
Office: Kehoe 202
Phone: (518) 564-2195
E-mail: lightsc@plattsburgh.edu